First Descent Reviews

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November 24, 2011
Top Critic
December 6, 2005
December 6, 2005
December 6, 2005
First Descent comes off as an overlong, overstuffed promo for an 'industry' that hasn't needed promoting since the movie's target audience was in diapers.
December 5, 2005
They're amazing athletes.
December 2, 2005
An adequate if slightly overlong history of the sport, Descent adheres to the same storytelling trajectory as documentary predecessors on surfing and skateboarding.
December 2, 2005
It doesn't get gnarlier than this.
December 2, 2005
At almost two hours, First Descent still moves along briskly, offering something for everyone, including the skeptical crowd that still thinks all snowboarders smoke pot and listen to Black Flag.
December 2, 2005
An overlong and surprisingly dull documentary about snowboarding.
December 2, 2005
Adrenaline rules, dude. If only the movie would give the audience more of it.
December 2, 2005
What should have been a thrilling 90-minute sport adventure runs on for 20 more repetitive minutes. First Descent is exciting, but less would surely have been more.
December 2, 2005
Equal parts historical retrospective and ESPN-style thrill ride.
December 2, 2005
There's probably a good snowboarding movie coming some day. This isn't it.
December 2, 2005
As documentaries about extreme sports go, First Descent seems a middle-range effort.
December 2, 2005
A sports documentary that occasionally veers toward becoming a lovesick advertisement for a popular sport but winds up celebrating with sweet earnestness the headstrong individual and his or her community of likeminded renegades.
December 2, 2005
These people are out of their minds.
December 1, 2005
If this chronicle of snowboarding has no more heft than a fresh coat of powder, it's awfully fun to roll around in.
December 1, 2005
Pic displays filmmakers Kevin Harrison's and Kemp Curley's love of snowboarding, but suffers from an unjustifiably long running time, considerable repetition and a generally awkward structure.
December 1, 2005
Curley and Harrison have created a surprisingly tedious, overblown defense of a sport that, while ushering in the era of "extreme" games, doesn't boast the cinematic potential or charismatic stars of its cousins on the asphalt and aquatic waves.
December 1, 2005
Visually, this is one of the most arresting sports documentaries in years, and it doesn't skimp on the visceral thrills, either.
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