Ghostbusters: Afterlife

2021, Comedy/Fantasy, 2h 4m

307 Reviews 5,000+ Verified Ratings

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critics consensus

Ghostbusters: Afterlife crosses the streams between franchise revival and exercise in nostalgia -- and this time around, the bustin' mostly feels good. Read critic reviews

audience says

A great cast, a fast-paced story, and tons of callbacks to the original movies make Ghostbusters: Afterlife fun for fans of the franchise. Read audience reviews

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Movie Info

In Ghostbusters: Afterlife, when a single mom and her two kids arrive in a small town, they begin to discover their connection to the original ghostbusters and the secret legacy their grandfather left behind.

Cast & Crew

Paul Rudd
Mr. Grooberson
Celeste O'Connor
Phoebe's Classmate
Bill Murray
Peter Venkman
Dan Aykroyd
Dr. Raymond Stantz
Ernie Hudson
Dr. Winston Zeddemore
Annie Potts
Janine Melnitz
Bokeem Woodbine
Sheriff Domingo
Gil Kenan
Screenwriter
Jason Reitman
Screenwriter
Dan Aykroyd
Executive Producer
Gil Kenan
Executive Producer
Jason Blumenfeld
Executive Producer
Michael Beugg
Executive Producer
Aaron L. Gilbert
Executive Producer
Jason Cloth
Executive Producer
Eric Steelberg
Cinematographer
Nathan Orloff
Film Editor
Rob Simonsen
Original Music
Francois Audouy
Production Design
Bill Ives
Art Director
Paul Healy
Set Decoration
Danny Glicker
Costume Designer
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News & Interviews for Ghostbusters: Afterlife

Critic Reviews for Ghostbusters: Afterlife

Audience Reviews for Ghostbusters: Afterlife

  • Feb 04, 2022
    Too much empty headed fan service masquerading as character building which is a shame because I actually liked the effects work which invokes the original in more effective and entertaining ways.
    Alec B Super Reviewer
  • Dec 19, 2021
    It starts off as a rather charming coming of age narrative but you quickly realize Phoebe is given too much attention and the supporting cast begins to simply exist to make an inclusive checklist of formulaic ingredients. I really enjoyed all the new characters, it was so sad to see them sidelined by the final acts of the film, replaced by what felt like uninspired fanfiction dedicated to those that still obsess over the original. There's something here, hopefully a sequel gives the new faces more screen time and meaningful roles.
    Drake T Super Reviewer
  • Dec 07, 2021
    As I stated in my review for the 2016 Ghostbusters, allow me to wax nostalgic and explain my own private history with the franchise: "Growing up in the 80s, other kids had Transformers, or G.I. Joe, or He-Man, but I was a Ghostbusters kid. I fell in love with the 1984 original movie, slept below the poster for most of my childhood, and obsessively collected all of the action figures and toys, watched with glee the animated TV series, and hold the world and its characters in a special personal place." This franchise means something to me. I think about the hours I spent playing in this world and my imagination and my own stories illustrated with marker and crayon, and it makes me extremely happy as well as reminds me how I fell in love with weird storytelling and macabre, ironic humor. I've been waiting for more Ghostbusters movies for my adult life. The 2016 movie was fine, I wasn't enraged by it in the slightest, but it didn't scratch that itch. While replicating some of the same plot beats, the 2016 movie was not reverent to its source material. Now the 2021 Ghostbusters, delayed over a year and a half from COVID, goes completely in the other direction. Ghostbusters: Afterlife is reverent to a fault, and while it has been met with mixed reviews and complaints of overdosing on slavish fan nostalgia, I found it to be a charming and fun family adventure that left me laughing, cheering, and even crying. Egon Spangler (Harold Ramis, R.I.P.), original Ghostbuster, is dead, killed by a malevolent spirit. His estranged adult daughter, Callie (Carrie Coon), and her two teen children, Trevor (Finn Wolfhard) and Phoebe (Mackenna Grace), are shocked to learn of his death and their unexpected inheritance: a dirt farm in small-town nowheresville Oklahoma. They don't know much about their grandfather and the kids are not exactly excited about relocating to a secluded mining town. Phoebe starts discovering weird pieces of technology hidden in the old house of her grandfather's. A presence seems to be reaching out and trying to get the family to understand their real legacy. It appears that Gozer the Gozerian was not fully defeated on top of that New York City skyscraper in 1984, and Phoebe and her family must learn about the past in order to make sure we all have a future. I can understand the charges of Afterlife being too nostalgic, but I don't understand the charges of it being so enamored with its past that it poses a disservice to the movie standing on its own. This movie is intended at its very DNA to live within the shadow of the original films. The director and co-writer, Jason Reitman, is the son of the original films' director, Ivan. It's going to be reverent but that's not an automatic bad thing. Whereas the 2016 reboot shrugged at past convention and went completely comedic, this edition takes the opposite approach, hugging onto the lore and past of Ghostbusters with heartfelt affection. If you're a fan of the franchise, this adoring approach will likely be more favorable, not that the 2016 film is wrong for eschewing the established canon of the franchise and trying something new. If Afterlife had been a completely original story set in a Ghostbusters universe, I would have happily accepted that. However, just because something is outwardly nostalgic, or taps into fan service, does not mean it is destined to be an exclusive retread that only satisfies the hardcore base. I didn't need the gratuitous Easter eggs of passing shots of a twinkie or Crunch bar, but they're blink-and-you'll-miss-them moments that don't really relate to anything of consequence, so I can excuse them. Afterlife is similar to The Force Awakens in that it uses familiar plot beats to mirror events of its predecessors to ease back fans and new members to the fanclub, most especially in Act Three where Gozer's demonic pooches are unleashed. I can understand many chaffing at this, but I feel that Afterlife does enough to justify its own creative existence even in facsimile rather than as some insular, facile, fan-stroking cash-grab. This is, by far, the most dramatic of the Ghostbusters movies, a series that has existed in the realm of comedy. The prior movies were never spooky on adult terms, but they reached back into a primal, childlike curiosity and anxiousness over the unknown that made them creepy when they wanted to be. I don't understand the umbrage some have expressed over Afterlife being more of a drama. First, the comedy is present throughout the movie with the characters making specific and wry observations that feel fitting for their situation. The humor is not as forced as the loping line-a-rama improv jazz riffs of Paul Feig's 2016 film. I think this universe can sustain different kinds of stories being told, and I think that drama is perfectly acceptable as long as it's earned, just like the comedy or horror elements. The central premise involves an estranged family coming to know the secret life of an absentee relative who abandoned them, so the more they learn about his Ghostbusting past and responsibilities, the closer they come to uncovering a clearer picture of who this man really was as well as their connections to him. Reitman and co-screenwriter Gil Kenan (Monster House) have smartly connected the investigation of the past into the development of personal relationships. We in the audience know the significance of the Ecto One and the ghost traps, but the new characters do not. We await them to understand the knowledge we already attain, but the movie doesn't play this as characters dawdling. Each discovery unlocks new potential for the characters to shape who they choose to be, and each one gets them closer to their grandfather and reshaping their conception of the man who they wrongfully believed abandoned them for folly. This all leads to a climax that had me genuinely in tears. I won't exactly spoil it but Afterlife's conclusion is less concerned with beating the Big Bad Gozer yet again and saving the universe. Reitman and company have smartly placed the real climax as an emotional catharsis; it's more in keeping with Field of Dreams than some huge Marvel apocalyptic showdown. The ending is personal, emotional, and reaches into our universal desire for closure, for having that one last moment with a beloved who we no longer have any moments left to share, Reitman is clearly missing Ramis, a close family friend and inspiration who died in 2014, and this is his own way of processing his personal grief, offering an emotional output for the fans to share in, and allowing a grieving character/surrogate to find that needed release. It serves as a fitting conclusion and a special end note for any Ghostbusters fan who has held this franchise close to their heart for several decades, especially if shared with a paternal figure who may be gone. The film also successfully channels a childhood perspective of awkward and awesome. It's hard to create a story where a group of precocious adolescents discover strange things cooking in their sleepy small town without suggesting Stephen King and Stranger Things, but this isn't necessarily a total negative. The earlier movies were always from a more cynical adult perspective. Yes, there were characters like Ray (Dan Ackroyd) and Egon who were true believers, but they were often set up for easy laughs. The tone of the series was mostly tied to the irony of the character of Peter Venkman (Bill Murray) that looked at the supernatural with droll detachment. This is the first Ghostbusters entry where the primary perspective is from children, and there's something hopeful and heartfelt about a younger point of view with the supernatural material. These kids are excited and eager to learn more about the somethings strange in their neighborhoods. It becomes endearing to ride along with them as they get to jump into the action. I loved the concept of a sidecar gunner seat for the Ecto One and how it felt like a childhood dream coming true. But it's more than fan service because it serves as a point of progression for Phoebe's sense of self, of embracing her scientific interests and roots, and taking charge in the face of unknown danger. It's a coming out of sorts. When the kids are driving through (the always empty?) town and chasing a runaway ghost, wrecking storefronts from the boom of the proton pack, it's a blast for them and us. This is Reitman's most commercial and mainstream film of his Oscar-nominated career. It's interesting to me that this indie darling, who was on such a hot streak in the late 2000s, hit some speed bumps with the critical misfires of 2013's Labor Day, 2014's Men, Women, and Children, and 2018's The Front Runner, so the next movie is a retreat to a big-budget franchise film. Reitman doesn't necessarily have the best feel for large-scale spectacle, but he knows intimate character dramas and guides his actors well. Grace (Gifted, Haunting of Hill House) is wonderful as our plucky lead. Unfortunately for Wolfhard (It, Stranger Things), his dull character has nothing to do but pine for a local girl, scoff at his family, and then fix up the old ghostbustin' mobile. Paul Rudd (Ant-Man) is as charming as ever as the school science teacher, especially as he nerds out over interacting with the Ghostbusters paraphernalia like an excitable fanboy living out his childhood dream. I wish Coon (The Leftovers) had more to do, but that's my primary complaint in any movie where Carrie Coon is a supporting actress. Her chemistry with Rudd is strong and they could have done so much more together as adults trying to make sense of madness. They could have eliminated Wolfhard's mopey older brother character entirely and given us more time with the goofy adults too. One feels like there is some secret contract where anything relating to 80s nostalgia requires the hiring of Wolfhard on hand. Ghostbusters: Afterlife will not be the best movie of 2021. There are areas that could have been improved and streamlined and better developed. However, Ghostbusters: Afterlife will most assuredly be my favorite film experience of 2021. It's a heart-warming continuation for fans with enough wit and whimsy to charm while owning its obvious and intended connections to the original. I may not be the most objective source on this particular matter, but I know what I like, and this movie had moments of pure happiness that just shot right through to my dopamine center. We'll see if this movie can restart the dormant franchise, and strike more on its own, but even if this lone 2021 entry is all that we eventually get, I'm happy I got to experience this magic once again. I can't wait to see it again with my dad. Nate's Grade: B+
    Nate Z Super Reviewer
  • Dec 06, 2021
    A clever update to the original two films and skillfully directed by Jason Reitman. The plot very uniquely connects to the original story and has a good cast led by Carrie Coon and Paul Rudd. The young performers are very talented and make the film enjoyable. Great cameos ice the cake. A very good holiday movie to entertain almost everyone. 12/04/2021
    Christopher O Super Reviewer

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