Highway Patrolman Reviews

  • Apr 29, 2014

    After Walker (1987), director Alex Cox was blacklisted from Hollywood, not only for attacking American foreign policy in that film, but also for breaking the WGA strike in 1988. Aside from doing introductions for BBC2's Moviedrome, he struggled to get films made, but his producer from Walker, Lorenzo O'Brien, had wrote a script, which Cox liked, however it was set in Mexico. But language barriers didn't bother Cox a bit. It begins with Pedro Rojas (Roberto Sosa) joining the Mexican highway patrol, he's young but eager to learn, and do right for the community. He works in the rural north of Mexico, which has wide open spaces but is open to all sorts of corruption, which Rojas wants no part of. However, his patrol partner Anibal Guerrero (Bruno Bichir) frequently takes bribes, which Rojas is scornful of. But, it's not long before Rojas starts turning to a life of crime, he cheats on his wife Griselda (Zaide Silvia Gutiérrez) with a local prostitute called Maribel (Vanessa Bauche), and it's Rojas who gets the money for it, not Maribel. But it's not long before this corrupt lifestyle catches up with Rojas big time. Even in Spanish, you can recognise Cox's stylistic direction and offbeat set-ups. It makes for an interesting moral tale about about the trouble corruption and power can land some people in, it should have seen Cox return to cinema, but he's struggled with trying to get films made ever since. Shame.

    After Walker (1987), director Alex Cox was blacklisted from Hollywood, not only for attacking American foreign policy in that film, but also for breaking the WGA strike in 1988. Aside from doing introductions for BBC2's Moviedrome, he struggled to get films made, but his producer from Walker, Lorenzo O'Brien, had wrote a script, which Cox liked, however it was set in Mexico. But language barriers didn't bother Cox a bit. It begins with Pedro Rojas (Roberto Sosa) joining the Mexican highway patrol, he's young but eager to learn, and do right for the community. He works in the rural north of Mexico, which has wide open spaces but is open to all sorts of corruption, which Rojas wants no part of. However, his patrol partner Anibal Guerrero (Bruno Bichir) frequently takes bribes, which Rojas is scornful of. But, it's not long before Rojas starts turning to a life of crime, he cheats on his wife Griselda (Zaide Silvia Gutiérrez) with a local prostitute called Maribel (Vanessa Bauche), and it's Rojas who gets the money for it, not Maribel. But it's not long before this corrupt lifestyle catches up with Rojas big time. Even in Spanish, you can recognise Cox's stylistic direction and offbeat set-ups. It makes for an interesting moral tale about about the trouble corruption and power can land some people in, it should have seen Cox return to cinema, but he's struggled with trying to get films made ever since. Shame.

  • Mar 22, 2014

    good tale of a cop in mexico city from the director of the original 'repo man' also year s/b 1991not 1993

    good tale of a cop in mexico city from the director of the original 'repo man' also year s/b 1991not 1993

  • Jul 26, 2010

    Interesting film that certainly does no harm to Cox's cult status.

    Interesting film that certainly does no harm to Cox's cult status.

  • Jun 03, 2010

    This almost forgotten gem, shows Cox on form. It transcends its low budget trappings and makes me wish Cox still made films like this.

    This almost forgotten gem, shows Cox on form. It transcends its low budget trappings and makes me wish Cox still made films like this.

  • Brody M Super Reviewer
    Mar 14, 2010

    I did not expect this movie to be as good as it was.Definitely a must see

    I did not expect this movie to be as good as it was.Definitely a must see

  • Aug 10, 2009

    Far from being an excellent piece of cinematography, but the portrayal of Latinamerican police forces and the inherent corruption in them is quite realistic.

    Far from being an excellent piece of cinematography, but the portrayal of Latinamerican police forces and the inherent corruption in them is quite realistic.

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    Eric B Super Reviewer
    Mar 17, 2008

    After the controversial flop "Walker," Alex Cox's career in Hollywood was finished. Four years passed before the British writer/director landed another feature, and he had to truck down to Mexico to shoot it -- with a slim budget and a cast whose biggest box-office draw was (drumroll, please) Pedro Armendariz Jr. No wonder the resulting film was barely distributed. Given its handicaps, "Highway Patrolman" is surprisingly first-rate. Cox's usual pop-culture satire is absent (he didn't write the screenplay), but it's not missed in this raw, realistic look at a young border officer negotiating a seedy world of drugs, swapped favors and double standards. The plot is largely episodic, and the story's lack of dramatic shape will be frustrating if you expect another action-packed "cop film." The story opens with proud Pedro Rojas (Roberto Sosa, oddly petite and cast against type) graduating from the academy, saluting his superiors with an unusual fist-to-chest gesture. But even as he's leaving, the system flashes its corruption: The new officers are drilled to stop a car first, and find a reason later. And from Pedro's initial traffic stop (where a woman cries to avoid a ticket), his principles begin to slip. Soon he's downing tequila, taking bribes, pocketing evidence and regularly visiting a prostitute, all while in uniform. He flags a truck that is illegally transporting workers, and ends up marrying the driver. When officer-related violence hits him on a personal level, he cleans up his priorities and launches a crusade for justice. But even there, he defies protocol. "Highway Patrolman"'s imagery is exquisite -- Cox's passion for spaghetti Westerns is unmistakeable amidst the yellow dust, desert brush, lonely roads, intriguing rock formations and decrepit villages. There's also a remarkable footbridge to enjoy. The landscapes do a nice job of compensating for the low production values, though there is one pitiful car mishap where you can practically see the explosive charges go off. Inspired catchphrase: "Buy our iguanas!"

    After the controversial flop "Walker," Alex Cox's career in Hollywood was finished. Four years passed before the British writer/director landed another feature, and he had to truck down to Mexico to shoot it -- with a slim budget and a cast whose biggest box-office draw was (drumroll, please) Pedro Armendariz Jr. No wonder the resulting film was barely distributed. Given its handicaps, "Highway Patrolman" is surprisingly first-rate. Cox's usual pop-culture satire is absent (he didn't write the screenplay), but it's not missed in this raw, realistic look at a young border officer negotiating a seedy world of drugs, swapped favors and double standards. The plot is largely episodic, and the story's lack of dramatic shape will be frustrating if you expect another action-packed "cop film." The story opens with proud Pedro Rojas (Roberto Sosa, oddly petite and cast against type) graduating from the academy, saluting his superiors with an unusual fist-to-chest gesture. But even as he's leaving, the system flashes its corruption: The new officers are drilled to stop a car first, and find a reason later. And from Pedro's initial traffic stop (where a woman cries to avoid a ticket), his principles begin to slip. Soon he's downing tequila, taking bribes, pocketing evidence and regularly visiting a prostitute, all while in uniform. He flags a truck that is illegally transporting workers, and ends up marrying the driver. When officer-related violence hits him on a personal level, he cleans up his priorities and launches a crusade for justice. But even there, he defies protocol. "Highway Patrolman"'s imagery is exquisite -- Cox's passion for spaghetti Westerns is unmistakeable amidst the yellow dust, desert brush, lonely roads, intriguing rock formations and decrepit villages. There's also a remarkable footbridge to enjoy. The landscapes do a nice job of compensating for the low production values, though there is one pitiful car mishap where you can practically see the explosive charges go off. Inspired catchphrase: "Buy our iguanas!"

  • xGary X Super Reviewer
    Dec 06, 2007

    Alex Cox's meandering cop story feels more like a road movie than a thriller per se. It follows a Mexican highway patrolman from his graduation from the academy through his posting on a deserted stretch of highway to his showdown with a local drug runner who killed his partner. It has a lot to commend it; the off-beat subject matter, gentle humour, good performances and well shot sun drenched landscapes. The main problem with it is it's lack of drama. The long anticipated showdown doesn't really come to anything; it may be making some clever analogy about Mexico's inability to hold accountable the foreigners who use it for their own corrupt ends, but it did not make a satisfying climax to the film entertainment-wise; this is not helped by having a rather wishy washy protagonist who is neither really good nor bad enough to intrigue. Having said that, there is still enough material of merit here to warrant a look, especially for fans of world cinema.

    Alex Cox's meandering cop story feels more like a road movie than a thriller per se. It follows a Mexican highway patrolman from his graduation from the academy through his posting on a deserted stretch of highway to his showdown with a local drug runner who killed his partner. It has a lot to commend it; the off-beat subject matter, gentle humour, good performances and well shot sun drenched landscapes. The main problem with it is it's lack of drama. The long anticipated showdown doesn't really come to anything; it may be making some clever analogy about Mexico's inability to hold accountable the foreigners who use it for their own corrupt ends, but it did not make a satisfying climax to the film entertainment-wise; this is not helped by having a rather wishy washy protagonist who is neither really good nor bad enough to intrigue. Having said that, there is still enough material of merit here to warrant a look, especially for fans of world cinema.

  • Dec 03, 2007

    Alex Cox's meandering cop story feels more like a road movie than a thriller per se. It follows a Mexican highway patrolman from his graduation from the academy through his posting on a deserted stretch of highway to his showdown with a local drug runner who killed his partner. It has a lot to commend it; the off-beat subject matter, gentle humour, good performances and well shot sun drenched landscapes. The main problem with it is it's lack of drama. The long anticipated showdown doesn't really come to anything; it may be making some clever analogy about Mexico's inability to hold accountable the foreigners who use it for their own corrupt ends, but it did not make a satisfying climax to the film entertainment-wise; this is not helped by having a rather wishy washy protagonist who is neither really good nor bad enough to intrigue. Having said that, there is still enough material of merit here to warrant a look, especially for fans of world cinema.

    Alex Cox's meandering cop story feels more like a road movie than a thriller per se. It follows a Mexican highway patrolman from his graduation from the academy through his posting on a deserted stretch of highway to his showdown with a local drug runner who killed his partner. It has a lot to commend it; the off-beat subject matter, gentle humour, good performances and well shot sun drenched landscapes. The main problem with it is it's lack of drama. The long anticipated showdown doesn't really come to anything; it may be making some clever analogy about Mexico's inability to hold accountable the foreigners who use it for their own corrupt ends, but it did not make a satisfying climax to the film entertainment-wise; this is not helped by having a rather wishy washy protagonist who is neither really good nor bad enough to intrigue. Having said that, there is still enough material of merit here to warrant a look, especially for fans of world cinema.