Killing Bono Reviews

  • Feb 03, 2018

    Killing Bono counts with a great leading actor: Ben Barnes and with a lot of great musical moments. The story is original and captivating, the script is well-organized, but it could have been more twisted and less dumb, because that stupidity made that every action by the protagonist could have been predicted by the spectator after so many mistakes and bad decisions.

    Killing Bono counts with a great leading actor: Ben Barnes and with a lot of great musical moments. The story is original and captivating, the script is well-organized, but it could have been more twisted and less dumb, because that stupidity made that every action by the protagonist could have been predicted by the spectator after so many mistakes and bad decisions.

  • Feb 06, 2016

    totally rocked. Was awesome

    totally rocked. Was awesome

  • Sep 19, 2015

    I actually watched this a couple weeks ago. Too funny

    I actually watched this a couple weeks ago. Too funny

  • Mar 21, 2015

    I liked this, it was silly, and sad. I know what it's like to feel like you're living in someone else's shadow. I love Robert Sheehan, he should do more and more stuff!

    I liked this, it was silly, and sad. I know what it's like to feel like you're living in someone else's shadow. I love Robert Sheehan, he should do more and more stuff!

  • Mar 14, 2015

    What a disjointed mess of a movie. The story is all over the place, and the filmmaking is sloppy. The characters are spoofs of real people and never felt real or relatable to me. It felt like the movie went on and on forever with no real purpose or resolution.

    What a disjointed mess of a movie. The story is all over the place, and the filmmaking is sloppy. The characters are spoofs of real people and never felt real or relatable to me. It felt like the movie went on and on forever with no real purpose or resolution.

  • Jan 28, 2015

    Interesting story, but it just doesn't grab you, still worth watching though.

    Interesting story, but it just doesn't grab you, still worth watching though.

  • Sep 16, 2014

    Of course this film isn't Oscar worthy, but it definitely has charm, quirkiness and catchy, hooky songs that do sound reminiscent of earlier U2. Of course that is "Shook Up's" whole problem, the torture of wanting to be and sound like an act that is already created. This story is loosely based on Neil and Ivan McCormack's struggle and anguish in trying to create a successful pop music career. It certainly doesn't help that Liam may or may not have been the fifth member of U2, but ended up following his older brother who was on a path of self-sabotage. I really enjoyed it, and also certainly didn't mind looking at actors Robert Sheehan and Ben Barnes for an hour and a half (Nothing wrong with a little eye candy!!). I still can't get the pop theme "Where We Wanna Be" out of my head!

    Of course this film isn't Oscar worthy, but it definitely has charm, quirkiness and catchy, hooky songs that do sound reminiscent of earlier U2. Of course that is "Shook Up's" whole problem, the torture of wanting to be and sound like an act that is already created. This story is loosely based on Neil and Ivan McCormack's struggle and anguish in trying to create a successful pop music career. It certainly doesn't help that Liam may or may not have been the fifth member of U2, but ended up following his older brother who was on a path of self-sabotage. I really enjoyed it, and also certainly didn't mind looking at actors Robert Sheehan and Ben Barnes for an hour and a half (Nothing wrong with a little eye candy!!). I still can't get the pop theme "Where We Wanna Be" out of my head!

  • Mar 03, 2014

    So bad I couldn't finish it

    So bad I couldn't finish it

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    May 11, 2013

    It all starts so innocently in Dublin when Ivan(Robert Sheehan) auditions for a band that Paul(Martin McCann) is putting together. Paul wants him as rhythm guitarist for his band, The Hype, but Ivan's brother Neil(Ben Barnes) intervenes without his brother's knowledge to keep him out of their band and in his, The Undertakers, who end up opening up for The Hype, just before it is renamed U2. Years later, Neil is a music journalist while The Undertakers are having trouble finding a venue to even perform in, eventually settling on an illegal strip joint where they cut a deal with Machin(Stanley Townsend), so they can move to London to pursue their dreams. Enter Gloria(Krysten Ritter). Well, if there was a fifth Beatle, then why could not there have almost been a fifth member of U2? It is a question the tragicomedy "Killing Bono," based on a true story, answers in its own engagingly offbeat way, aided by Pete Postlethwaite who is a blast in his final screen appearance and Stanley Townsend in a neat turn. And that's not to mention the usual bug-eyed charm of Robert Sheehan. In general, "Killing Bono" does a fine job of exploring what it takes to succeed in the music business. When we first see U2, there is no doubt they are going places, although maybe not as world conquerors, yet. And then there is Neil, as the movie points out, who is plagued by chronic guilt, bad decisions and even worse timing on an almost divine scale, being simultaneously overshadowed by and doomed to trying to compete with somebody who is just so gosh darn nice.

    It all starts so innocently in Dublin when Ivan(Robert Sheehan) auditions for a band that Paul(Martin McCann) is putting together. Paul wants him as rhythm guitarist for his band, The Hype, but Ivan's brother Neil(Ben Barnes) intervenes without his brother's knowledge to keep him out of their band and in his, The Undertakers, who end up opening up for The Hype, just before it is renamed U2. Years later, Neil is a music journalist while The Undertakers are having trouble finding a venue to even perform in, eventually settling on an illegal strip joint where they cut a deal with Machin(Stanley Townsend), so they can move to London to pursue their dreams. Enter Gloria(Krysten Ritter). Well, if there was a fifth Beatle, then why could not there have almost been a fifth member of U2? It is a question the tragicomedy "Killing Bono," based on a true story, answers in its own engagingly offbeat way, aided by Pete Postlethwaite who is a blast in his final screen appearance and Stanley Townsend in a neat turn. And that's not to mention the usual bug-eyed charm of Robert Sheehan. In general, "Killing Bono" does a fine job of exploring what it takes to succeed in the music business. When we first see U2, there is no doubt they are going places, although maybe not as world conquerors, yet. And then there is Neil, as the movie points out, who is plagued by chronic guilt, bad decisions and even worse timing on an almost divine scale, being simultaneously overshadowed by and doomed to trying to compete with somebody who is just so gosh darn nice.

  • Mar 25, 2013

    a fun movie with great britpop indie soundtrack.

    a fun movie with great britpop indie soundtrack.