Me Myself I Reviews

  • Nov 16, 2010

    A little-known gem. Warm, funny, and touching. I like the "what if" genre, and in particular really enjoyed the interaction between Griffiths and her other-life children.

    A little-known gem. Warm, funny, and touching. I like the "what if" genre, and in particular really enjoyed the interaction between Griffiths and her other-life children.

  • May 21, 2010

    not watchin it again.

    not watchin it again.

  • Jan 08, 2010

    A Tour De Force for Rachel Griffiths. Good movie for both men and women. Funny, poignant, revealing look into real life.

    A Tour De Force for Rachel Griffiths. Good movie for both men and women. Funny, poignant, revealing look into real life.

  • Jun 29, 2009

    The conceit for <i>Me Myself I</i> is essentially the same one as in <i>The Family Man</i> or <i>It's a Wonderful Life</i>, that of, "What if...?" What if things had been different, what if Pamela Drury had married the guy who had proposed to her thirteen years ago instead of turning him down, where would her life be now? Not that she's in any real need for change. She doesn't allow herself to be happy, but she's a very successful woman (she uses her numerous journalism awards as paperweights). She lives alone, but seems to enjoy it - jamming out to music on her stereo, eating whatever she pleases without having to ask anybody's permission first. And it's not as though she doesn't have friends: the movie begins with everybody in her office throwing her a spectacular birthday party. Yet there's this nagging sensation, that biological clock perhaps, that tells her that she ought to be married with children by now... despite her disdain for children. And so it's not much longer before Pamela gets hit by a car while crossing the street. It's not that which changes her life, though, so much as the fact that the person driving the car was herself. Yes! She meets up with her own self, only this self did get married to Robert Dickson when he proposed, and this self does have three children, and this self is living the life that Pamela thinks she should have been living, and... wait, where did this self go? Much to Pamela's dismay, her twin or clone or whatever vanishes when she turns her back, leaving our single party-girl Pamela to take over the reins of the family. And so. That's it. Pamela learns how to be a mother and wife, although none of it is handled especially well. I guess we're supposed to root for her as she figures out how to show authority with her unruly son, or to imagine that she has found some new level of awareness or maturity as she guides her daughter through a difficult time in her life. But none of this really resonates, sadly, and by the movie's end it doesn't seem as though Pamela has any truly different opinions on the subjects of marriage and parenthood. Does she now dislike the idea, or has the experience reinforced her previous desires? No answer here. Like a cat, she meows at the door, desperate to get out... but when she gets out, suddenly she wants back in. Make up your mind! I already have a mostly positive picture of star Rachel Griffiths, having watched her the television show "Six Feet Under". She has a way of moving her eyes and lips that makes her seem like she would have been perfectly suited for silent movies. Oh, to see Griffiths alongside Buster Keaton! What a pairing that would have been. Further, <i>Me Myself I</i> does have a few genuinely comic moments, such as the bait-and-switch that occurs after Pamela goes out on a date early in the film with a dreary guy who is scared to death of being thought of as a loser. Those things - Griffiths' inherent charm and the occasional chuckles that the movie manages to elicit - allow <i>Me Myself I</i> to be an amiable flick, even if it doesn't really have a lot of drive to it. It doesn't even have enough guile to sap it up with an over-bearing score. It doesn't do much of anything, really. I feel like I say this a lot, but: I don't know that I really liked this movie, so much as I just didn't <i>dislike</i> it.

    The conceit for <i>Me Myself I</i> is essentially the same one as in <i>The Family Man</i> or <i>It's a Wonderful Life</i>, that of, "What if...?" What if things had been different, what if Pamela Drury had married the guy who had proposed to her thirteen years ago instead of turning him down, where would her life be now? Not that she's in any real need for change. She doesn't allow herself to be happy, but she's a very successful woman (she uses her numerous journalism awards as paperweights). She lives alone, but seems to enjoy it - jamming out to music on her stereo, eating whatever she pleases without having to ask anybody's permission first. And it's not as though she doesn't have friends: the movie begins with everybody in her office throwing her a spectacular birthday party. Yet there's this nagging sensation, that biological clock perhaps, that tells her that she ought to be married with children by now... despite her disdain for children. And so it's not much longer before Pamela gets hit by a car while crossing the street. It's not that which changes her life, though, so much as the fact that the person driving the car was herself. Yes! She meets up with her own self, only this self did get married to Robert Dickson when he proposed, and this self does have three children, and this self is living the life that Pamela thinks she should have been living, and... wait, where did this self go? Much to Pamela's dismay, her twin or clone or whatever vanishes when she turns her back, leaving our single party-girl Pamela to take over the reins of the family. And so. That's it. Pamela learns how to be a mother and wife, although none of it is handled especially well. I guess we're supposed to root for her as she figures out how to show authority with her unruly son, or to imagine that she has found some new level of awareness or maturity as she guides her daughter through a difficult time in her life. But none of this really resonates, sadly, and by the movie's end it doesn't seem as though Pamela has any truly different opinions on the subjects of marriage and parenthood. Does she now dislike the idea, or has the experience reinforced her previous desires? No answer here. Like a cat, she meows at the door, desperate to get out... but when she gets out, suddenly she wants back in. Make up your mind! I already have a mostly positive picture of star Rachel Griffiths, having watched her the television show "Six Feet Under". She has a way of moving her eyes and lips that makes her seem like she would have been perfectly suited for silent movies. Oh, to see Griffiths alongside Buster Keaton! What a pairing that would have been. Further, <i>Me Myself I</i> does have a few genuinely comic moments, such as the bait-and-switch that occurs after Pamela goes out on a date early in the film with a dreary guy who is scared to death of being thought of as a loser. Those things - Griffiths' inherent charm and the occasional chuckles that the movie manages to elicit - allow <i>Me Myself I</i> to be an amiable flick, even if it doesn't really have a lot of drive to it. It doesn't even have enough guile to sap it up with an over-bearing score. It doesn't do much of anything, really. I feel like I say this a lot, but: I don't know that I really liked this movie, so much as I just didn't <i>dislike</i> it.

  • Feb 28, 2009

    A nice move about how no matter what choices we make in life we will always wounder what it would be like if we made different choices.

    A nice move about how no matter what choices we make in life we will always wounder what it would be like if we made different choices.

  • Jan 02, 2009

    Really strange movie

    Really strange movie

  • Jan 02, 2009

    An entertaining Australian movie dealing with life choices and the topic of The Double.

    An entertaining Australian movie dealing with life choices and the topic of The Double.

  • Dec 25, 2008

    A sugarcoated romantic comedy that is just clever enough to make you wish it were three times as smart and only a third as sweet.

    A sugarcoated romantic comedy that is just clever enough to make you wish it were three times as smart and only a third as sweet.

  • Sep 20, 2008

    very good movie on romance

    very good movie on romance

  • Jan 25, 2008

    Rachel Griffiths is unbelievably charming and the film itself is actually an effective "What if?" where disbelief is easily suspended.

    Rachel Griffiths is unbelievably charming and the film itself is actually an effective "What if?" where disbelief is easily suspended.