Porco Rosso (Kurenai no buta) Reviews

  • Feb 20, 2021

    When can a film be cons a masterpiece? This is the question I asked myself before viewing this film. After it was finished, I had my closest answer; a masterpiece is defined not only by it's visual athletics, but by the way it can connect with it's audience. A masterpiece will not just keep its viewers engaged, but it will change them internally and toggle with their mindset and emotions in a beautifully emotional manner. Porco rosso pretty much fits my definition of a masterpiece; the animation is flawless and emersive, the artwork is stunning and abs breathtaking, the story is powerful with strong themes and messages throughout its plot, and the musical score is simply ear caviar; a delicacy for the mind and soul. I absolutely love this film, as it is, to me, a masterpiece. However, it is still not a perfect masterpiece, hence why I am not giving this film a full 5 stars. The ending, or lack there of, is short and feels unfinished. If there were only a few more minutes given to the end to fully wrap up the story, this film would be absolutely perfect. However, even with it's rather abrupt ending, this movies is still a masterpiece, and one of my favorite films made yet.

    When can a film be cons a masterpiece? This is the question I asked myself before viewing this film. After it was finished, I had my closest answer; a masterpiece is defined not only by it's visual athletics, but by the way it can connect with it's audience. A masterpiece will not just keep its viewers engaged, but it will change them internally and toggle with their mindset and emotions in a beautifully emotional manner. Porco rosso pretty much fits my definition of a masterpiece; the animation is flawless and emersive, the artwork is stunning and abs breathtaking, the story is powerful with strong themes and messages throughout its plot, and the musical score is simply ear caviar; a delicacy for the mind and soul. I absolutely love this film, as it is, to me, a masterpiece. However, it is still not a perfect masterpiece, hence why I am not giving this film a full 5 stars. The ending, or lack there of, is short and feels unfinished. If there were only a few more minutes given to the end to fully wrap up the story, this film would be absolutely perfect. However, even with it's rather abrupt ending, this movies is still a masterpiece, and one of my favorite films made yet.

  • Feb 13, 2021

    Marco Polo in the sky. During the time before the WWII, where there were many seaplane pirates, a mysterious ex-air force turned pig pilot Porco Rosso was brave enough to stop them. Now preparing to fight the American's ace, Porco enlists the help of a young mechanic. The premise of this movie was very unique, and I had a great time appreciating flying in the sky, and how cool it was. The best part was the main pilot, Porco Rosso. He was badass like a boss, and I enjoyed his witty and snappy sentences. As for the historical aspect, the story promoted feminism at the time by showing the women doing the hard work of designing and assembling a seaplane. This is very similar to the situation in the US, where most of the men were in combat while the women were essential in providing resources for the war. My issue with the movie was that I wanted more character development to the female characters. Because of this, I was not as much invested in the romance as I wanted to. Overall, a pretty entertaining historical piece. 7.5/10

    Marco Polo in the sky. During the time before the WWII, where there were many seaplane pirates, a mysterious ex-air force turned pig pilot Porco Rosso was brave enough to stop them. Now preparing to fight the American's ace, Porco enlists the help of a young mechanic. The premise of this movie was very unique, and I had a great time appreciating flying in the sky, and how cool it was. The best part was the main pilot, Porco Rosso. He was badass like a boss, and I enjoyed his witty and snappy sentences. As for the historical aspect, the story promoted feminism at the time by showing the women doing the hard work of designing and assembling a seaplane. This is very similar to the situation in the US, where most of the men were in combat while the women were essential in providing resources for the war. My issue with the movie was that I wanted more character development to the female characters. Because of this, I was not as much invested in the romance as I wanted to. Overall, a pretty entertaining historical piece. 7.5/10

  • Jan 10, 2021

    More story than most Ghibli movies, but surprisingly light despite the subject matter.

    More story than most Ghibli movies, but surprisingly light despite the subject matter.

  • Dec 25, 2020

    A portly hero flies into your heart. Hayao Miyazaki's romantic aerial adventure anime Porco Rosso (1992) is a surprisingly pleasant watch from the master director of anime epics. Porco Ross flies by for 94 quick minutes thanks to Hayao Miyazaki and Takeshi Seyama's sharp cuts within dog fights and brief encounters. I never thought I'd see a pig fly outside of a Pink Floyd album cover, but Porco Rosso sends a pig up in the air with stylish fashion and a pretty red plane. Porco Rosso is a cool character, aimlessly surviving life's twists and tragedies by forgetting as the wind hits his face midair. He is a remarkable pig. As Porco says, "A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig." Hayao Miyazaki's direction is as engaging and entertaining as any of his beloved anime pictures. Miyazaki's writing for Porco Rosso is fascinating as he simultaneously tells the tale of when pigs fly by virtue of an Italian army pilot scarred by the sheer volume of pilots dying around him during the wars, then cursed to appear as a pig. But, as Porco says, "I'd rather be a pig than a fascist," so he remains on the run from Italian Secret Police. It's a charming story that feels like a whimsical animated version of an old film noir complete with a subtle romance between our enigmatic hero and his femme fatale. He balances the mystique of Porco's past and inner longing for love with a narrative about ace pilot Porco Rosso collecting bounties on sea pirates harassing ports and cruises for treasure. I like that Porco befriends his new engineer Fio as well for some added humor and adventure. Porco Rosso is a wondrous film that once again captures Miyazaki's well established love for aeronautics with his numerous flying machines in a majority of his pictures. Seeing all the phenomenal hand drawn animation from Studio Ghibli for all of Porco Rosso's aerial combat sequence is very impressive with planes weaving in and around one another as bullets shoot everywhere like hail from the bluest skies. Mark Henley and Atsushi Okui's cinematography utilizes heavy amounts of far wide shots to keep your eyes on the action in the air with the occasional close-ups for character emotion translated to the audience. Porco Rosso just looks amazing with these bright reds on the plane and Fio's hair, plush pinks on Porco's pigskin, and lush blues for the ocean seawater. Joe Hisaishi's score is triumphantly exciting to contribute to Porco Rosso's sweeping epic nature, but also playful for all the comedic bits scattered around like the wind through Fio's hair. Hisaishi's music has long caressed Miyazaki's films with a warm tone and loving gracefulness and Porco Rosso is no exception. Kazutoshi Sato's sound design is excellent with flares of noise for explosions, whirring sounds for bullets just missing planes, and thunderous jolts for plane engines firing off. Katsu Hisamura's production design is beautiful for the oceanside diner, every seaside port, and even Porco's secret cove hideaway. Michael Keaton's voice is perfect for the pig ace pilot Porco Rosso. His deep voice is serious enough to be believable as an experienced wartime flying pilot. He makes Porco's every word carry weight with Keaton's commanding presence and dark gravitas. I like his pig noises he throws in to ensure Porco is also funny alongside his straightlaced pig pilot persona. Susan Egan is stunningly perfectly cast as Gina. Her sultry voice is full of longing and loss that feels comparable to Keaton's dour Porco Rosso voice acting. I really enjoyed the bright and fiery vocal performance from Kimberly Williams-Paisley as Fio Piccolo. Her perky personality and passionate delivery about plane engineering are convincing as the ever astute optimist Fio. Cary Elwes is excellent as the annoying American antagonist pilot Donald Curtis. He is cocky and sexist enough to be loathsome and an apt opposite to Porco's charming nature. Although, Michael Keaton pulls off Porco's sexist comments about Fio's well, so that he feels likable by the end still. Brad Garrett's sea pirate captain Mamma Aiuto Boss is very funny and expressive. Lastly, David Ogden Stiers is excitable and energetic as Fio's Grandpa Piccolo. In all, I simply adored Porco Rosso's cute comedy and playful heart. You can tell that Miyazaki's love of planes and honorable fights scorches Porco Rosso with a heartfelt tenderness like Porco's plane engine exploding.

    A portly hero flies into your heart. Hayao Miyazaki's romantic aerial adventure anime Porco Rosso (1992) is a surprisingly pleasant watch from the master director of anime epics. Porco Ross flies by for 94 quick minutes thanks to Hayao Miyazaki and Takeshi Seyama's sharp cuts within dog fights and brief encounters. I never thought I'd see a pig fly outside of a Pink Floyd album cover, but Porco Rosso sends a pig up in the air with stylish fashion and a pretty red plane. Porco Rosso is a cool character, aimlessly surviving life's twists and tragedies by forgetting as the wind hits his face midair. He is a remarkable pig. As Porco says, "A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig." Hayao Miyazaki's direction is as engaging and entertaining as any of his beloved anime pictures. Miyazaki's writing for Porco Rosso is fascinating as he simultaneously tells the tale of when pigs fly by virtue of an Italian army pilot scarred by the sheer volume of pilots dying around him during the wars, then cursed to appear as a pig. But, as Porco says, "I'd rather be a pig than a fascist," so he remains on the run from Italian Secret Police. It's a charming story that feels like a whimsical animated version of an old film noir complete with a subtle romance between our enigmatic hero and his femme fatale. He balances the mystique of Porco's past and inner longing for love with a narrative about ace pilot Porco Rosso collecting bounties on sea pirates harassing ports and cruises for treasure. I like that Porco befriends his new engineer Fio as well for some added humor and adventure. Porco Rosso is a wondrous film that once again captures Miyazaki's well established love for aeronautics with his numerous flying machines in a majority of his pictures. Seeing all the phenomenal hand drawn animation from Studio Ghibli for all of Porco Rosso's aerial combat sequence is very impressive with planes weaving in and around one another as bullets shoot everywhere like hail from the bluest skies. Mark Henley and Atsushi Okui's cinematography utilizes heavy amounts of far wide shots to keep your eyes on the action in the air with the occasional close-ups for character emotion translated to the audience. Porco Rosso just looks amazing with these bright reds on the plane and Fio's hair, plush pinks on Porco's pigskin, and lush blues for the ocean seawater. Joe Hisaishi's score is triumphantly exciting to contribute to Porco Rosso's sweeping epic nature, but also playful for all the comedic bits scattered around like the wind through Fio's hair. Hisaishi's music has long caressed Miyazaki's films with a warm tone and loving gracefulness and Porco Rosso is no exception. Kazutoshi Sato's sound design is excellent with flares of noise for explosions, whirring sounds for bullets just missing planes, and thunderous jolts for plane engines firing off. Katsu Hisamura's production design is beautiful for the oceanside diner, every seaside port, and even Porco's secret cove hideaway. Michael Keaton's voice is perfect for the pig ace pilot Porco Rosso. His deep voice is serious enough to be believable as an experienced wartime flying pilot. He makes Porco's every word carry weight with Keaton's commanding presence and dark gravitas. I like his pig noises he throws in to ensure Porco is also funny alongside his straightlaced pig pilot persona. Susan Egan is stunningly perfectly cast as Gina. Her sultry voice is full of longing and loss that feels comparable to Keaton's dour Porco Rosso voice acting. I really enjoyed the bright and fiery vocal performance from Kimberly Williams-Paisley as Fio Piccolo. Her perky personality and passionate delivery about plane engineering are convincing as the ever astute optimist Fio. Cary Elwes is excellent as the annoying American antagonist pilot Donald Curtis. He is cocky and sexist enough to be loathsome and an apt opposite to Porco's charming nature. Although, Michael Keaton pulls off Porco's sexist comments about Fio's well, so that he feels likable by the end still. Brad Garrett's sea pirate captain Mamma Aiuto Boss is very funny and expressive. Lastly, David Ogden Stiers is excitable and energetic as Fio's Grandpa Piccolo. In all, I simply adored Porco Rosso's cute comedy and playful heart. You can tell that Miyazaki's love of planes and honorable fights scorches Porco Rosso with a heartfelt tenderness like Porco's plane engine exploding.

  • Dec 04, 2020

    When humans are inhuman it's better to be pig.

    When humans are inhuman it's better to be pig.

  • Nov 09, 2020

    My personal favourite Ghibli... I love this film

    My personal favourite Ghibli... I love this film

  • Sep 13, 2020

    One of my favourites from Ghibli. Such a funny, mature and surprisingly deep story about a flying pig. I love every character in this movie! And the animation and Hisaishi's music are top notch.

    One of my favourites from Ghibli. Such a funny, mature and surprisingly deep story about a flying pig. I love every character in this movie! And the animation and Hisaishi's music are top notch.

  • Aug 17, 2020

    My least favorite Miyazaki film so far. It still had gorgeous animation but the tone was off. It didn't seem goofy or fun enough to be a kid's movie, while also not being serious enough for a more adult take. It missed the mark for me.

    My least favorite Miyazaki film so far. It still had gorgeous animation but the tone was off. It didn't seem goofy or fun enough to be a kid's movie, while also not being serious enough for a more adult take. It missed the mark for me.

  • Jul 15, 2020

    It has problematic plot points and an unattractive premise, but features impressive and vivid animation, stunning flight sequences, and a thrilling and engaging narrative, but it's far from being among Studio Ghibli's best works.

    It has problematic plot points and an unattractive premise, but features impressive and vivid animation, stunning flight sequences, and a thrilling and engaging narrative, but it's far from being among Studio Ghibli's best works.

  • Jul 08, 2020

    Notably less effective than some of Miyazaki's earlier efforts, but still exuding much of his characteristic charm. I think Porco Rosso seems like something of a reduced effort given that it doesn't quite dive into the whimsy as much as previous outings, the world is less original (though beautifully rendered), and the established stakes/"serious" elements are less profound. Where this film succeeds brilliantly is through its exploration of flight and aviation - a passion that Miyazaki has integrated into all of his major features, often creating moments of pure cinematic joy. In comparison to other classic Ghibli, Porco Rosso is less than stellar, but it still beats most animation of the '90s on the whole. (4/5)

    Notably less effective than some of Miyazaki's earlier efforts, but still exuding much of his characteristic charm. I think Porco Rosso seems like something of a reduced effort given that it doesn't quite dive into the whimsy as much as previous outings, the world is less original (though beautifully rendered), and the established stakes/"serious" elements are less profound. Where this film succeeds brilliantly is through its exploration of flight and aviation - a passion that Miyazaki has integrated into all of his major features, often creating moments of pure cinematic joy. In comparison to other classic Ghibli, Porco Rosso is less than stellar, but it still beats most animation of the '90s on the whole. (4/5)