Saxon Reviews

  • Jun 18, 2009

    Saxon's press notes boast of its adherence to, and playfulness with, the rules and conventions of the great American westerns, but it is a very pleasant surprise to observe just how subtle and shrewd those genre nods are. The plot is appropriately simple: Eddie (Sean Harris) returns home to the grim, ghostly Saxon housing estate after both a brief spell in prison, and a visit from a sadistic loan shark. With his one functioning eyeball on the line, Eddie tries to make a fast buck by interacting with a succession of the estate's most volatile misfits, in an attempt to track down a minor local celebrity who has inexplicably vanished. It is an irrefutable oddity for sure, but the plot's fiendish momentum does exert a palpable grip, and for a film shot for almost nothing, it looks outstanding; composed entirely of wide-angled handheld shots, it comes off (visually, at least) like a collaboration between Luc Besson and Andrew Bujalski. But the ominous, whacked-out aura is all its own. This is simply perfect if you're in the mood for some impeccably crafted weird.

    Saxon's press notes boast of its adherence to, and playfulness with, the rules and conventions of the great American westerns, but it is a very pleasant surprise to observe just how subtle and shrewd those genre nods are. The plot is appropriately simple: Eddie (Sean Harris) returns home to the grim, ghostly Saxon housing estate after both a brief spell in prison, and a visit from a sadistic loan shark. With his one functioning eyeball on the line, Eddie tries to make a fast buck by interacting with a succession of the estate's most volatile misfits, in an attempt to track down a minor local celebrity who has inexplicably vanished. It is an irrefutable oddity for sure, but the plot's fiendish momentum does exert a palpable grip, and for a film shot for almost nothing, it looks outstanding; composed entirely of wide-angled handheld shots, it comes off (visually, at least) like a collaboration between Luc Besson and Andrew Bujalski. But the ominous, whacked-out aura is all its own. This is simply perfect if you're in the mood for some impeccably crafted weird.

  • Jan 21, 2008

    Fast Eddie has just returned to Saxon, a housing estate in Croydon after doing a stint in prison. At present he's missing an eye, and if he doesn't come up with a hefty sum of money, the other one's going too. In order to make the cash, Eddie turns sleuth to uncover the mystery of a missing gameshow contestant. Saxon is a surreal modern day western, packing a punch to the gut from the opening scene. The limited locations and digital video photography expose Saxon's low budget, but the high energy of everyone involved rises above it with a witty script and a strong central performance from Sean Harris.

    Fast Eddie has just returned to Saxon, a housing estate in Croydon after doing a stint in prison. At present he's missing an eye, and if he doesn't come up with a hefty sum of money, the other one's going too. In order to make the cash, Eddie turns sleuth to uncover the mystery of a missing gameshow contestant. Saxon is a surreal modern day western, packing a punch to the gut from the opening scene. The limited locations and digital video photography expose Saxon's low budget, but the high energy of everyone involved rises above it with a witty script and a strong central performance from Sean Harris.