Secret Honor (1984)

TOMATOMETER

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Secret Honor Photos

Movie Info

'Secret Honor' is a filmed version of Donald Freed and Arnold Stone's one-man play wherein the disgraced Richard M. Nixon ruminates over his failed career and suggests that he was really nothing more than the puppet of a sinister "committee" seeking global power.
Rating:
NR
Genre:
Comedy , Drama , Special Interest
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 limited
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:
Cinecom International Films

Cast

Philip Baker Hall
as Richard M. Nixon

Critic Reviews for Secret Honor

All Critics (13) | Top Critics (3)

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | June 23, 2006
Time Out
Top Critic

Rarely have I seen ninety more compelling minutes on the screen.

Full Review… | October 23, 2004
Chicago Sun-Times
Top Critic

One of the funniest, most unsettling, most imaginative and most surprisingly affecting movies of its very odd kind I've ever seen.

Full Review… | May 20, 2003
New York Times
Top Critic

The dramatic material, overheated to begin with, is hyped up by hysterical acting and further exaggerated by a busy mise-en-scene based on meaningless camera movements and space-destroying zooms.

Full Review… | December 31, 1999
Chicago Reader
Top Critic

Altman's take on a fascinating one-man show, with Philip Baker Hall staggeringly good as the disgraced Richard Milhous Nixon.

Full Review… | January 17, 2016
rec.arts.movies.reviews

The pic delivers a fascinating story in a fascinating way.

Full Review… | April 17, 2011
Ozus' World Movie Reviews

Audience Reviews for Secret Honor

½

The screenplay is undeniably compelling and Philip Baker Hall's performance is wonderfully manic.

Alec Barniskis
Alec Barniskis

Super Reviewer

Altman returns to top form and delivers an amazing, tense and thrilling one man show. Phillip Baker Hall in his greatest role and Altman's camera does the rest.

Graham Jones
Graham Jones

Super Reviewer

½

Robert Altman was a scientist. He was constantly exploring new ways to tell cinematic stories and "Secret Honor" was one of his most daring experiments. During the 1980s Altman was shunned from Hollywood due to his underperforming films. He spent the better part of the decade directing plays, teaching classes and recording theater. When he did make a film, it was usually with the same select few cast and crew he was repeatedly using. "Secret Honor," a one man film about a fictional hour and a half of Richard Nixon's life, was a result of one of these collaborations. "Secret Honor" was the final 'project,' so to speak, of one of his Chicago based film classes. Students filled in the positions of crew. Philip Baker Hall reprises his role from the play in the film. "Secret Honor" is a stream of conscious, fictional, portrayal of a historical figure in crisis. The structure can get tiresome, as with any single location film, but there are moments of brilliance. Baker Hall can be riveting and over the top in equal measure, much like Nixon himself. I also enjoyed that this, much like Oliver Stone's "W." was a balanced portrayal, both judgmental and sympathetic. "Secret Honor" is not a home run by any means. The film can drag due to the fact it's essentially an endless monologue but it's still well worth seeing. It's a claustrophobic, anxiety ridden experience that, love it or hate it, you will not likely forget.

Steven Carrier
Steven Carrier

Super Reviewer

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