The Truman Show - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Truman Show Reviews

Page 1 of 1007
½ July 16, 2017
91% - The Truman Show is truly a different film that is so fun to watch but at the same time, it has a story that is very relatable to everyone as it shows the reality of the world that we are living in and the types of people we meet.
½ July 16, 2017
The story is timeless. The acting is amazing. The universe of the movie is well put. Amazing job!
July 13, 2017
it's great to watch a peak Jim Carrey's performance without his over the top acting.

ps: the writing and other supporting act were really good too.
July 11, 2017
Jim Carrey is at his best in this beautiful yet funny masterpiece
½ July 5, 2017
If the director were Quentin Tarantino, he would ask the main character to shot a bullet in everyone invloved in this cruel and sick show, including those stupid audience. It is definitely a good movie, but it really makes me furious.
July 2, 2017
We accept the reality of the world with which were presented."
½ June 30, 2017
very well done. pretty funny
½ June 25, 2017
An extremely clever movie starring comedian Jim Carrey that is just a bit more drama than comedy, but it's not necessarily a bad thing. It is thought-provoking and very enjoyable, and probably Jim Carrey's best.
June 24, 2017
These people created the NSA.
June 22, 2017
Best Jim Carrey performance.
May 23, 2017
Entertainingly through provoking due to the excellent performances and direction.
½ May 16, 2017
Kind of a bore but I find the story somewhat interesting.
½ May 7, 2017
A funny, tender, and thought-provoking film full of interesting characters!
April 27, 2017
A True Review of The Truman Show

Film reviews nowadays tend to be extremely superficial, its analysis stemming from the surface rather than analyzing it at a deeper level for the presence of ideologies and politics. Peter Weir's The Truman Show is an excellent example of this as on the surface, it is about the main character, Truman Burbank, played by Jim Carrey, whose entire life is a façade that is broadcast on live television. However, analyzing it further, it becomes apparent that it is much more than that. The film explores the politics of reality as well as how mass media influences our perception of it and architectures of containment, may it be archaeological, ideological or psychological. Weir achieves this through both the content via the interactions and power relations between the people as well as the form in the way that the film is constructed in terms of camera shots and the presence of visual metaphors.
The Truman Show is a film that revolves around the life of Truman, which is completely scripted, he is surrounded by professional actors in a fake setting for a tv show that is broadcast around the world. This entire concept is portrayed in a negative light, using the creator of the tv show as the antagonist. In doing so, the film attempts to push forth a certain ideology, one with a clear Socratic binary opposition between artificiality and reality. It also sets in a place a hierarchy where artificiality is below reality and portrays reality as something we should fight for and strive towards. This is explicit when Christof, the creator of the show, says "While the world he (Truman) inhabits is, in some respects, counterfeit, there is nothing fake about Truman himself" (0:0:30, Weir). Here, he admits to Truman's world being fake and contrasts it to Truman himself as completely real and describes this as the reason to why the show is so successful. He proposes that society desires something more realistic through television rather than artificial "reality" shows. As this dialogue takes place at the start of the film, it creates the space 'ex nihilo' (out of nowhere) for the film going forward and foreshadows the exploration of the meaning of reality. The film also implies this idea of the contrast between Truman and his world in terms of reality and artificiality by his apt name - "True-Man". This has the unconscious effect of enforcing the idea that Truman represents reality whereas Seahaven represents artificiality. This shows how although everything he is surrounded by is artificial, the life that he leads is very much real. However, the audience is still filled with a feeling of dissatisfaction as it is implied that real life is in contrast to the one that Truman leads. This arises from our unconscious realization and subsequent denial that the life that Truman leads is eerily similar to the lives that we have become accustomed to. This results in an innate feeling of discomfort watching the façade of a life that Truman leads. The audience in the film also have this feeling however, mass media exploits their unconscious desire to watch Truman's life unravel to employ cynical reason and overcome this feeling of dissatisfaction. This goes to show the extent to which mass media shapes society and the influence that it has over us.
The architectures of containment present in the film also explores the concept of society's repression and emphasizes mass media's control over society. This is achieved by illustrating how Truman is controlled and trapped in Seahaven. The archaeological architecture used here is that of Seahaven being a desolate island, that is separate from the rest of society. However, this is successful in trapping Truman due to its psychological impact via his fear of water that was instilled in him through the staged traumatic incident of his father drowning in front of him during his childhood. This created an unconscious architecture of containment that manifests itself in his conscious fear of water. This idea is also emphasized through the form in which he is portrayed when his fear of water takes over as he is shown through multiple fish-eye lenses in this scene, which forms a visual metaphor of him as a fish stuck in a bowl (0:8:22, Weir). The fish eye-lens is also used in other scenes to emphasize his entrapment in this society. The film also shows that although Truman is trapped, he could escape if he wished to, which is illustrated through him finally escaping at the end. However, what prevents him from escaping for the majority of the film is his fear of the 'Big Other' - a repressive force that establishes control over people by exploiting their unconscious to set in place a symbolic order (iek). The irony in this situation is that there is no such thing. The 'Big Other' is a figment of his own unconscious created to establish order in fear of the alternative - chaos. This directly applies to us as well as we tend to create and give power to the 'Big Other' by fearing it and this, in turn represses us into the constraints of society. In this sense, Truman acts as an effective allegory for our current society as it is he himself who takes away his freedom and in doing so, gives power to the 'Big Other'. Through the film, he also escapes his entrapment by overcoming his fear of the 'Big Other' and in doing so, takes away its power. This provides a feeling of contentment for the audience watching the film as they feel like they too have escaped this entrapment. However, what happens here is due to this feeling, the 'Big Other' in society is in fact empowered as this reduces the desire of the audience to escape their entrapment and further solidifies it instead.
Through its exploration of the politics of reality and containment, The Truman Show is shown to be a political film that's successful in its purpose as it emphasizes the control of the 'Big Other' over society. It also shows how blurred the line between reality and artificiality through our unconscious denial of the parallels between Truman's life and ours. This, in turn, forces us to ask ourselves the ultimate question - are the lives that we lead 'real'?
April 27, 2017
A True Review of The Truman Show

Film reviews nowadays tend to be extremely superficial, its analysis stemming from the surface rather than analyzing it at a deeper level for the presence of ideologies and politics. Peter Weir's The Truman Show is an excellent example of this as on the surface, it is about the main character, Truman Burbank, played by Jim Carrey, whose entire life is a façade that is broadcast on live television. However, analyzing it further, it becomes apparent that it is much more than that. The film explores the politics of reality as well as how mass media influences our perception of it and architectures of containment, may it be archaeological, ideological or psychological. Weir achieves this through both the content via the interactions and power relations between the people as well as the form in the way that the film is constructed in terms of camera shots and the presence of visual metaphors.
The Truman Show is a film that revolves around the life of Truman, which is completely scripted, he is surrounded by professional actors in a fake setting for a tv show that is broadcast around the world. This entire concept is portrayed in a negative light, using the creator of the tv show as the antagonist. In doing so, the film attempts to push forth a certain ideology, one with a clear Socratic binary opposition between artificiality and reality. It also sets in a place a hierarchy where artificiality is below reality and portrays reality as something we should fight for and strive towards. This is explicit when Christof, the creator of the show, says "While the world he (Truman) inhabits is, in some respects, counterfeit, there is nothing fake about Truman himself" (0:0:30, Weir). Here, he admits to Truman's world being fake and contrasts it to Truman himself as completely real and describes this as the reason to why the show is so successful. He proposes that society desires something more realistic through television rather than artificial "reality" shows. As this dialogue takes place at the start of the film, it creates the space 'ex nihilo' (out of nowhere) for the film going forward and foreshadows the exploration of the meaning of reality. The film also implies this idea of the contrast between Truman and his world in terms of reality and artificiality by his apt name - "True-Man". This has the unconscious effect of enforcing the idea that Truman represents reality whereas Seahaven represents artificiality. This shows how although everything he is surrounded by is artificial, the life that he leads is very much real. However, the audience is still filled with a feeling of dissatisfaction as it is implied that real life is in contrast to the one that Truman leads. This arises from our unconscious realization and subsequent denial that the life that Truman leads is eerily similar to the lives that we have become accustomed to. This results in an innate feeling of discomfort watching the façade of a life that Truman leads. The audience in the film also have this feeling however, mass media exploits their unconscious desire to watch Truman's life unravel to employ cynical reason and overcome this feeling of dissatisfaction. This goes to show the extent to which mass media shapes society and the influence that it has over us.
The architectures of containment present in the film also explores the concept of society's repression and emphasizes mass media's control over society. This is achieved by illustrating how Truman is controlled and trapped in Seahaven. The archaeological architecture used here is that of Seahaven being a desolate island, that is separate from the rest of society. However, this is successful in trapping Truman due to its psychological impact via his fear of water that was instilled in him through the staged traumatic incident of his father drowning in front of him during his childhood. This created an unconscious architecture of containment that manifests itself in his conscious fear of water. This idea is also emphasized through the form in which he is portrayed when his fear of water takes over as he is shown through multiple fish-eye lenses in this scene, which forms a visual metaphor of him as a fish stuck in a bowl (0:8:22, Weir). The fish eye-lens is also used in other scenes to emphasize his entrapment in this society. The film also shows that although Truman is trapped, he could escape if he wished to, which is illustrated through him finally escaping at the end. However, what prevents him from escaping for the majority of the film is his fear of the 'Big Other' - a repressive force that establishes control over people by exploiting their unconscious to set in place a symbolic order (iek). The irony in this situation is that there is no such thing. The 'Big Other' is a figment of his own unconscious created to establish order in fear of the alternative - chaos. This directly applies to us as well as we tend to create and give power to the 'Big Other' by fearing it and this, in turn represses us into the constraints of society. In this sense, Truman acts as an effective allegory for our current society as it is he himself who takes away his freedom and in doing so, gives power to the 'Big Other'. Through the film, he also escapes his entrapment by overcoming his fear of the 'Big Other' and in doing so, takes away its power. This provides a feeling of contentment for the audience watching the film as they feel like they too have escaped this entrapment. However, what happens here is due to this feeling, the 'Big Other' in society is in fact empowered as this reduces the desire of the audience to escape their entrapment and further solidifies it instead.
Through its exploration of the politics of reality and containment, The Truman Show is shown to be a political film that's successful in its purpose as it emphasizes the control of the 'Big Other' over society. It also shows how blurred the line between reality and artificiality through our unconscious denial of the parallels between Truman's life and ours. This, in turn, forces us to ask ourselves the ultimate question - are the lives that we lead 'real'?
April 27, 2017
A True Review of The Truman Show

Film reviews nowadays tend to be extremely superficial, its analysis stemming from the surface rather than analyzing it at a deeper level for the presence of ideologies and politics. Peter Weir's The Truman Show is an excellent example of this as on the surface, it is about the main character, Truman Burbank, played by Jim Carrey, whose entire life is a façade that is broadcast on live television. However, analyzing it further, it becomes apparent that it is much more than that. The film explores the politics of reality as well as how mass media influences our perception of it and architectures of containment, may it be archaeological, ideological or psychological. Weir achieves this through both the content via the interactions and power relations between the people as well as the form in the way that the film is constructed in terms of camera shots and the presence of visual metaphors.
The Truman Show is a film that revolves around the life of Truman, which is completely scripted, he is surrounded by professional actors in a fake setting for a tv show that is broadcast around the world. This entire concept is portrayed in a negative light, using the creator of the tv show as the antagonist. In doing so, the film attempts to push forth a certain ideology, one with a clear Socratic binary opposition between artificiality and reality. It also sets in a place a hierarchy where artificiality is below reality and portrays reality as something we should fight for and strive towards. This is explicit when Christof, the creator of the show, says "While the world he (Truman) inhabits is, in some respects, counterfeit, there is nothing fake about Truman himself" (0:0:30, Weir). Here, he admits to Truman's world being fake and contrasts it to Truman himself as completely real and describes this as the reason to why the show is so successful. He proposes that society desires something more realistic through television rather than artificial "reality" shows. As this dialogue takes place at the start of the film, it creates the space 'ex nihilo' (out of nowhere) for the film going forward and foreshadows the exploration of the meaning of reality. The film also implies this idea of the contrast between Truman and his world in terms of reality and artificiality by his apt name - "True-Man". This has the unconscious effect of enforcing the idea that Truman represents reality whereas Seahaven represents artificiality. This shows how although everything he is surrounded by is artificial, the life that he leads is very much real. However, the audience is still filled with a feeling of dissatisfaction as it is implied that real life is in contrast to the one that Truman leads. This arises from our unconscious realization and subsequent denial that the life that Truman leads is eerily similar to the lives that we have become accustomed to. This results in an innate feeling of discomfort watching the façade of a life that Truman leads. The audience in the film also have this feeling however, mass media exploits their unconscious desire to watch Truman's life unravel to employ cynical reason and overcome this feeling of dissatisfaction. This goes to show the extent to which mass media shapes society and the influence that it has over us.
The architectures of containment present in the film also explores the concept of society's repression and emphasizes mass media's control over society. This is achieved by illustrating how Truman is controlled and trapped in Seahaven. The archaeological architecture used here is that of Seahaven being a desolate island, that is separate from the rest of society. However, this is successful in trapping Truman due to its psychological impact via his fear of water that was instilled in him through the staged traumatic incident of his father drowning in front of him during his childhood. This created an unconscious architecture of containment that manifests itself in his conscious fear of water. This idea is also emphasized through the form in which he is portrayed when his fear of water takes over as he is shown through multiple fish-eye lenses in this scene, which forms a visual metaphor of him as a fish stuck in a bowl (0:8:22, Weir). The fish eye-lens is also used in other scenes to emphasize his entrapment in this society. The film also shows that although Truman is trapped, he could escape if he wished to, which is illustrated through him finally escaping at the end. However, what prevents him from escaping for the majority of the film is his fear of the 'Big Other' - a repressive force that establishes control over people by exploiting their unconscious to set in place a symbolic order (iek). The irony in this situation is that there is no such thing. The 'Big Other' is a figment of his own unconscious created to establish order in fear of the alternative - chaos. This directly applies to us as well as we tend to create and give power to the 'Big Other' by fearing it and this, in turn represses us into the constraints of society. In this sense, Truman acts as an effective allegory for our current society as it is he himself who takes away his freedom and in doing so, gives power to the 'Big Other'. Through the film, he also escapes his entrapment by overcoming his fear of the 'Big Other' and in doing so, takes away its power. This provides a feeling of contentment for the audience watching the film as they feel like they too have escaped this entrapment. However, what happens here is due to this feeling, the 'Big Other' in society is in fact empowered as this reduces the desire of the audience to escape their entrapment and further solidifies it instead.
Through its exploration of the politics of reality and containment, The Truman Show is shown to be a political film that's successful in its purpose as it emphasizes the control of the 'Big Other' over society. It also shows how blurred the line between reality and artificiality through our unconscious denial of the parallels between Truman's life and ours. This, in turn, forces us to ask ourselves the ultimate question - are the lives that we lead 'real'?
April 24, 2017
Heartfelt and amazingly odd in all aspects.
April 14, 2017
Genre: Soap Opera Sci-Fi Satire. Stars: Jim Carrey the actor, Peter Weir the director, Andrew Niccol the screenwriter. Biggest strength: Stirring execution of the premise of a "random" person's life, from Day 1, being entirely televised for the whole world, with everything in this person's life being scripted (to the in-film director's best ability). Biggest weakness: At some points, we are to consider whether or not the isolated, crime-free world in which Truman has lived is truly better than the real, crime-ridden world that watches Truman's life. Andrew Niccol does not follow with that fully, instead wishing to indulge us, the viewers of his movie, with these vague notions of needing to be free, and rooting for the romance(?) between Carrey and some woman who first told him that his entire life is a lie. Leave it be, Niccol! You came dangerously close to self-parody, in certain scenes. Thankfully, Peter Weir had the chops to bring most of the scenes into comedic light; better yet, the casting choice of Jim Carrey helped even more. There were some delightful moments of simply watching Truman do his routine thing. Weir and Carrey are unitedly responsible for letting us, the audience, care about Truman, even if not as much as the audience of the in-film Truman Show.
April 14, 2017
The Truman Show is a comedy direted by Peter Weir released in 1998. The movie speaks about Truman Burbank. Since his birth, his world is only a gigantic set of shooting and all those around him are actors. He alone is ignorant of reality. The film explores his first doubts and his quest to discover the purpose of his life.

Truman, interpreted by Jim Carrey seems happy in a routine that it is itself built. He nevertheless has a water phobia of the sea, due to a terrible accident when he was young.
Gradually as the movie have started, we discover Truman and his habits of the day and we see that Truman is endearing and comical because sometimes he acts like a kid so it's funny.

The movie team uses many special effects and realizes a huge work for the settings which earned the prize for the best movie scenery. The movie is filmed from different points of view, sometimes we see Truman thanks to the camera that films him in the daily (included in the film) while sometimes it is a camera in the real life.
There are many close-ups centered on Truman.

I think the message of this film is that, anyone cannot take control of the life of someone and exploited him without him knowing to obtain from him any money or entertainment. Also by this film, the director criticizes the reality TV that began to develop in 1989.

Goods points of the movie : it is full of very amazing and surprising ideas, the beginning is funny but later we discover that Truman is manipulated so we put ourselves on his places, which allows to really be captivated into the screenplay.
For me, the ending is the most beautiful thing in all the movie, because the dialogue with the project manager who tried to hold back Truman is deep and sincere and is a beautiful life lesson.

So worth watching ? I advise film to all those who have not seen it because it is not only my favorite movie but because there is an incredible actor games that allowed Jim Carrey to take back the Golden Globe 1999 and Ed Harris The Oscar for Best Supporting Actor.
April 11, 2017
Amazing movie. I love the message
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