Very Important Person Reviews

  • Jul 11, 2019

    As good as comic film gets.

    As good as comic film gets.

  • Jul 21, 2017

    Comedy doesn't age well. While we're obviously meant to be amused by his bloated ego, it's not always obvious now what the joke is. And when he's such a pompous sexist asshole it's hard to want him to succeed, as we're obviously meant to.

    Comedy doesn't age well. While we're obviously meant to be amused by his bloated ego, it's not always obvious now what the joke is. And when he's such a pompous sexist asshole it's hard to want him to succeed, as we're obviously meant to.

  • May 27, 2016

    good UK WWII pic post WWII simaliar to US service comedies Hollywood was cranking out.

    good UK WWII pic post WWII simaliar to US service comedies Hollywood was cranking out.

  • Feb 18, 2014

    funny British comedy....

    funny British comedy....

  • Feb 10, 2013

    They don't make them like this anymore

    They don't make them like this anymore

  • Sep 06, 2012

    Directed by Ken Annakin (Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines (1965) and Monte Carlo or Bust (1969)), this is a very entertaining Prisoner of War comedy, with a cast which reads like a who's who of British comedy of stage, screen and TV. It also has a brilliant lead from a bombastic British actor who was brilliant at these kinds of roles. During World War II, scientist Sir Ernest Pease (James Robertson Justice) is sent on an RAF mission to see how on of his inventions works, however for security reasons, no-one has to know who he is, so he goes in as Lieutenant Farrow. But, when the plane is attacked over Germany, Pease manages to bail out, but is captured by the German's. He is sent to a POW camp, mostly occupied by RAF officers, led by Senior British Officer Travers (Norman Bird), who susses out that Pease isn't really Farrow. Pease comes clean, and confides in Travers, who along with fellow prisoners Jimmy Cooper (Leslie Phillips), Everett (Stanley Baxter) and "Bonzo" Baines (Jeremy Lloyd) hatch a plan to help get Pease out of there and back home to Blighty before anyone releases he's gone. It is a witty and amusing comedy, James Robertson Justice was a true force of nature, and he was great at playing grumpy old men, and here is no exception, with a witty script and good support by John Le Mesurier, Richard Wattis and Eric Sykes.

    Directed by Ken Annakin (Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines (1965) and Monte Carlo or Bust (1969)), this is a very entertaining Prisoner of War comedy, with a cast which reads like a who's who of British comedy of stage, screen and TV. It also has a brilliant lead from a bombastic British actor who was brilliant at these kinds of roles. During World War II, scientist Sir Ernest Pease (James Robertson Justice) is sent on an RAF mission to see how on of his inventions works, however for security reasons, no-one has to know who he is, so he goes in as Lieutenant Farrow. But, when the plane is attacked over Germany, Pease manages to bail out, but is captured by the German's. He is sent to a POW camp, mostly occupied by RAF officers, led by Senior British Officer Travers (Norman Bird), who susses out that Pease isn't really Farrow. Pease comes clean, and confides in Travers, who along with fellow prisoners Jimmy Cooper (Leslie Phillips), Everett (Stanley Baxter) and "Bonzo" Baines (Jeremy Lloyd) hatch a plan to help get Pease out of there and back home to Blighty before anyone releases he's gone. It is a witty and amusing comedy, James Robertson Justice was a true force of nature, and he was great at playing grumpy old men, and here is no exception, with a witty script and good support by John Le Mesurier, Richard Wattis and Eric Sykes.

  • Jul 23, 2009

    A real gem of a film this one. Set in a WW2 POW camp where a high ranking naval officer is captured and then plans his escape along with his fellow cell mates. A top British cast give some truly splendid performances.

    A real gem of a film this one. Set in a WW2 POW camp where a high ranking naval officer is captured and then plans his escape along with his fellow cell mates. A top British cast give some truly splendid performances.

  • Mar 04, 2009

    Unusual to see James Robertson Justice in a lead, rather than supporting role. A pretty good film.

    Unusual to see James Robertson Justice in a lead, rather than supporting role. A pretty good film.

  • Feb 13, 2009

    James Robertson Justice could only play one character, but his robust no-nonesense demeanor works again here in this prison camp comedy. Good laughs and presence from him.

    James Robertson Justice could only play one character, but his robust no-nonesense demeanor works again here in this prison camp comedy. Good laughs and presence from him.