Grace Kelly

Grace Kelly

Highest Rated: 100% 14 Hours (1951)

Lowest Rated: 80% The Bridges at Toko-Ri (1954)

Birthday: Nov 12, 1929

Birthplace: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Both literally and metaphorically, Grace Kelly was the cinema's fairy-tale princess; beautiful, elegant, and impossibly glamorous, she transcended the limits of Hollywood aristocracy to attain the power and glory of true royalty. Born November 12, 1929, in Philadelphia, PA, her father was a wealthy industrialist while her mother was a onetime cover girl. Her uncle, George Kelly, was the Pulitzer Prize-winning dramatist behind the plays The Show-Off and Craig's Wife. At the age of ten, she made her own theatrical debut in a Philadelphia-area production, and in her late teens she moved to New York, where she worked as a model while attending the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. After turning down a Hollywood contract for fear of being typecast as a starlet, Kelly began to work in television, and in 1949 she made her Broadway debut in a revival of August Strindberg's The Father. When Hollywood again came calling, she accepted and was soon cast in a bit part in 1951's Fourteen Hours.In just her second screen appearance, Kelly co-starred in a certifiable classic, the 1952 Western High Noon. Curiously, however, she did not benefit from the film's success, and no other offers were immediately forthcoming. She agreed to a screen test for a role in Taxi! but was rejected in favor of Constance Smith. However, the screen test found its way to director John Ford, who tapped her for 1953's Mogambo. The result was a seven-year contract with MGM, as well as a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination. Alfred Hitchcock then enlisted Kelly's services for a pair of 1954 films, Dial M for Murder and the brilliant Rear Window; it was said that she was the perfect blonde the master director had been seeking throughout his career. She was now a major star, and when actress Jennifer Jones became unexpectedly pregnant, Paramount begged MGM to allow Kelly to take her place in 1954's The Country Girl. The studio initially refused, but she successfully battled for the role. The result was a Best Actress Oscar.After starring in MGM's Green Fire, Kelly teamed with Hitchcock for the third and final time on 1955's To Catch a Thief. While filming on the French Riviera, she met Prince Rainier III of Monaco, and the two began a romance which was soon making international headlines. After starring in 1956's High Society, a musical update of The Philadelphia Story, and a remake of the onetime Lillian Gish vehicle The Swan, Kelly announced her pending marriage to Rainier. She also announced her retirement from filmmaking to devote her full energies to her new duties as Princess of Monaco. A lavish wedding soon followed, and although it was announced in 1962 that she was to return to Hollywood to star in Hitchcock's Marnie, she later withdrew from the project and never acted again. Grace Kelly died September 14, 1982, in an auto accident after suffering a heart attack while driving.

Photos

Highest Rated Movies

Filmography

Movies

Credit
No Score Yet History of Jazz: Oxygen for the Ears Actor 2014
No Score Yet Callas assoluta Actor 2007
No Score Yet The Fabulous '50s Actor 2002
No Score Yet Grace Kelly, American Princess Actor 1991
No Score Yet Legends in Love Actor 1990
No Score Yet You're the Top: The Cole Porter Story Actor 1990
No Score Yet Grace Kelly: An American Princess Actor 1987
No Score Yet The AFI Lifetime Achievement Awards: Jimmy Stewart Actor 1980
No Score Yet The Children of Theatre Street Narrator 1977
No Score Yet Frank Sinatra in Concert at Royal Festival Hall Actor 1971
No Score Yet The Poppy Is Also a Flower Introduction 1966
No Score Yet The Swan Princess Alexandra 1956
82% High Society Tracy Lord 1956
96% To Catch a Thief Frances Stevens 1955
No Score Yet Green Fire Catherine Knowland 1954
86% The Country Girl Georgie Elgin 1954
99% Rear Window Lisa Carol Fremont 1954
89% Dial M for Murder Margot Mary Wendice 1954
80% The Bridges at Toko-Ri Nancy Brubaker 1954
83% Mogambo Linda Nordley 1953
96% High Noon Amy 1952
100% 14 Hours Mrs. Fuller 1951
No Score Yet Flying Clipper - Traumreise unter weissen Segeln (Mediterranean Holiday) Actor

QUOTES FROM Grace Kelly CHARACTERS

Frances Stevens says: Have you ever had a better offer?

John Robie (The Cat) says: You know as well as I do, those jewels are fake.

Frances Stevens says: Well I'm not.

Frances Stevens says: He's a thief.

Mrs. Jessie Stevens says: And what did he steal from you?

Frances Stevens says: Oh, mother!

Mrs. Jessie Stevens says: Since when is love a crime?

L.B. Jeffries (Jeff) says: She's like a queen bee with her pick of the drones.

Lisa Carol Fremont says: I'd say she's doing a woman's hardest job: juggling wolves

Lisa Carol Fremont says: I'd say she's doing a woman's hardest job: juggling wolves.

Amy Kane says: Don't try to be a hero! You don't have to be a hero, not for me!

John Robie (The Cat) says: John Robie: You're here in Europe to buy a husband. Frances Stevens: The man I want doesn't have a price. John Robie: That eliminates me.

John Robie (The Cat) says: You're here in Europe to buy a husband.

Frances Stevens says: The man I want doesn't have a price.

John Robie (The Cat) says: That eliminates me.

Frances Stevens says: Would you like a leg or a breast? [Grace Kelly offers Cary Grant some chicken]

Amy Kane says: Then what is it? Why is he staying?

Helen Ramirez says: If you don't know, I cannot explain it to you.

Frances Stevens says: From where I sat it looked as though you were conjugating some irregular verbs.

Lisa Carol Fremont says: Why would Thorwald want to kill a little dog? Because it knew too much?

Lisa Carol Fremont says: Where does a man get inspiration to write a song like that?

L.B. Jeffries (Jeff) says: He gets it from the landlady once a month.

Lisa Carol Fremont says: A murderer would never parade his crime in front of an open window.

Georgie Elgin says: There’s nothing quite so mysterious and silent as a dark theater… a night without a star.

Georgie Elgin says: There's nothing quite so mysterious and silent as a dark theater, a night without a star.