Otto Waldis

Otto Waldis

  • Highest Rated: 100% 5 Fingers (1952)
  • Lowest Rated: 67% Border Incident (1949)
  • Birthday: Not Available
  • Birthplace: Not Available
  • With his learned countenance and a correct Germanic manner that could be avuncular or threatening, Otto Waldis was one of the more familiar European character actors in Hollywood and on television in the years after World War II. Born Otto Brunn in Vienna, Austria, in 1901, he turned to acting in his twenties and made his screen debut in an uncredited role in Fritz Lang's M in 1931. He worked in one more movie that year -- Kinder Vor Gericht -- and then was unseen in films until after the war. Waldis' career resumed in 1947 in Hollywood under the aegis of his fellow European expatriate, director Max Ophüls, in the latter's The Exile. He was fully employed over the next decade, working constantly in television and movies, his performances covering a wide swath of entertainment. In 1948 alone, before he'd even made the jump to television, Waldis worked in popular, big studio productions like Henry Hathaway's Call Northside 777, Jacques Tourneur's Berlin Express, and independent films such as Ophüls' Letter From an Unknown Woman. He went on to play character roles in lighter fare, including the comedies I Was a Male War Bride and Love Happy (both 1949). With his wizened, bespectacled presence and correct Austrian bearing, Waldis was suited to roles ranging from valets to scientists; in The Whip Hand (1951), he played an unrepentant Nazi germ-warfare expert, while in Unknown World (1951) and Attack of the 50 Foot Woman (1958), he played more benign scientists. But in 5 Fingers (1952), he was a Pullman porter, and in the Adventures of Superman episode "The Whistling Bird," he was part of a criminal conspiracy. He would occasionally play much more offbeat parts, such as Patch-Eye in Prince Valiant (1954). He closed out the 1950s portraying a police officer in Edward Dmytryk's disastrous remake of The Blue Angel (1959). Waldis' activity slackened considerably in the '60s, a period in which he made his first appearances in German films since the '30s. He was back in Hollywood during the '70s and had just been signed to appear in Mel Brooks' Young Frankenstein at the time of his death from a heart attack in early 1974.

Highest Rated Movies

Filmography

Movies

Rating

Title

Credit

Box
Office

Year

No Score Yet Phantom of Soho Liver-Spot 1966
91% Judgment at Nuremberg Pohl 1961
No Score Yet Pier 5, Havana Schluss 1959
75% Attack of the 50 Foot Woman Dr. Von Loeb 1958
No Score Yet Man from Del Rio Tom Jordan 1956
No Score Yet Desert Sands Gabin 1955
No Score Yet Sincerely Yours Zwolinski 1955
No Score Yet Knock on Wood Brodnik 1954
No Score Yet Prince Valiant Patch Eye 1954
No Score Yet The Black Castle Krantz 1952
No Score Yet Anything Can Happen Sandro 1952
100% 5 Fingers Pullman Porter 1952
No Score Yet Unknown World Dr. Max A. Bauer 1951
No Score Yet The Whip Hand Dr. Willem Bucholtz 1951
No Score Yet Secrets of Monte Carlo Louis Gunther 1951
No Score Yet Night Into Morning (People in Love) Dr. Franz Neimoller 1951
No Score Yet Bird of Paradise Skipper 1951
No Score Yet Dark City Benowski 1950
67% Border Incident Fritz 1949
No Score Yet The Lovable Cheat Bailiff 1949
No Score Yet Bagdad Marengo 1949
No Score Yet Berlin Express Kessler 1948
100% Letter From an Unknown Woman Concierge 1948
73% Call Northside 777 Boris 1948
No Score Yet The Exile Jan 1947
100% M Actor $18.1K 1931

TV

Rating

Title

Credit

Year

No Score Yet Hogan's Heroes
1965-1971
Doctor
  • 1967
No Score Yet Alfred Hitchcock Presents
1955-1962
Mr. Koslov Sam
  • 1958
No Score Yet Maverick
1957-1962
Scharf
  • 1958
No Score Yet Perry Mason
1957-1966
Mr. Kolichek John Lowell
  • 1958
No Score Yet The Adventures of Superman
1952-1958
Foreign Agent
  • 1954

QUOTES FROM Otto Waldis CHARACTERS

Werner Lammpe
You do not think it was like that, do you? [the other defendants are silent] There were executions, yes, but nothing like that. Nothing at all! [turns to another prisoner] Pöhl. Pöhl! You ran those concentration camps, you and Eichmann. They say we killed millions of people. [scoffs] Millions of people! How could it be possible? Tell them, how could it be possible?
Werner Lammpe
You do not think it was like that, do you? [the other defendants are silent] There were executions, yes, but nothing like that. Nothing at all! [turns to another prisoner] You ran those concentration camps, you and Eichmann. They say we killed millions of people. [scoffs] Millions of people! How could it be possible? Tell them, how could it be possible?
Pohl
[matter-of-fact] It's possible.
Werner Lammpe
[aghast] How?
Pohl
You mean, technically? It all depends on your facilities. Say you have two chambers to accommodate 2000 people apiece. Figure it out. It's possible to get rid of 10,000 in a half hour. You don't even need knives to do it. You can tell them they're going to take a shower, then instead of water, you turn on the gas. It's not the killing that's the problem, it's disposing of the bodies. That's the problem.