Emily Yoshida Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Emily Yoshida

Emily Yoshida
Emily Yoshida's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
77% Voyeur (2017) The question of what exactly to do with all this material escapes the filmmakers, just as it did Talese.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
No Score Yet It's all elliptical, and what's meant to feel portentous feels like borrowed meaning.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2017
84% Brimstone & Glory (2017) In Brimstone, it's a manic, freewheeling moment, empowering to the young person holding the flames and foreshadowing the impossibly precarious explosions to come.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
87% Darkest Hour (2017) The details aren't as important as the grand sweep, and these historical figures are tools to illustrate big, fat human themes of perseverance and identity.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2017
97% Coco (2017) Coco is as indebted to Ratatouille as it is to Studio Ghibli's Spirited Away, but the combination of sensibilities and the colorful, semi-spooky milieu of the afterlife realm where most of the film is set is not at all unwelcome.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2017
92% A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer fant├ística) (2018) When she finally achieves the small recompense she seeks, it's a visceral relief. I just wish Vega and Lelio let us in a little more to see her as an individual, aside from the hostility she encounters.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2017
18% Daddy's Home 2 (2017) This is a toxic, not at all benign film made for the enjoyment of everyone still oblivious to the fact that this kind of worldview is crashing down in flames even as we speak.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 9, 2017
100% A Gray State (2017) Even in its more meandering moments it is a gripping, almost unbearably dark watch.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
90% Princess Cyd (2017) Not a lot happens in Princess Cyd, but it's hard not to watch this film without feeling changed.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2017
54% LBJ (2017) It's not that Johnson isn't a compelling dramatic figure, but [Rob] Reiner's film is too broad and simplistic to capture why that is.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2017
29% A Bad Moms Christmas (2017) It's painful to watch a talented cast grimace their way through this stuff.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2017
34% Jigsaw (2017) Watching Jigsaw go about his torture business is about as interesting as watching a child burn ants - a dumb and ugly waste of energy, resources and time.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 27, 2017
76% Thank You for Your Service (2017) There's not much here to surprise or stir, and if it were a documentary it would likely be accused of not going far enough with its subject. But it doesn't do too much to justify itself as a narrative film, either ...‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2017
89% Only the Brave (2017) Only the Brave feels like a film that would have made sense coming from Peter Berg or Michael Bay, but Kosinski mostly pulls back on the macho cheerleading to find something more objective, and ultimately, deeply emotional.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2017
29% All I See Is You (2017) All I See Is You is weird, but it is emphatically not dumb.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
33% Leatherface (2017) The effect of the film is the same as the deflating effect of explaining a joke; it completely miscalculates the phenomenon of the audience's original reaction.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2017
65% Breathe (2017) It's a plenty good story to tell, but even by the time the respirator takes its last gasp, I was ultimately unmoved.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2017
95% Human Flow (2017) Ai [Weiwei] clearly wants to take a macro view of an impossible problem, to find some clarity in abstraction. But whenever he just talks to the refugees face to face, we learn more than any drone shot could tell us.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2017
87% Professor Marston & The Wonder Women (2017) Professor Marston is escapist entertainment of the highest, most nourishing order. And all somehow without summoning a single fiery god of War.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 10, 2017
98% Dina (2017) The film is mostly happy to stay in its sweetly mundane lane, but not without keeping a couple dramatic and moving bumps waiting down the road.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 6, 2017
75% Una (2017) Mara and this story both deserve better.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 4, 2017
100% Faces Places (Visages, villages) (2017) There is a real sweetness to this film, especially in Varda and JR's intergenerational chemistry, and its unfussy tone serves it well.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2017
92% Super Dark Times (2017) [Kevin] Phillips kind of stumbles when he tries for a pat wrap-up of a still-horrific problem. But when he digs into the muck of the rot at the heart of it, he comes up with some unforgettable moments.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
87% American Made (2017) It's the grubbiest, greasiest vision of bad boys gettin' away with it in recent memory, a glass of sour milk specifically timed to curdle just at the moment you think it might be harmless.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
54% The Lego Ninjago Movie (2017) There's no there there, and the film never seems to know what it's playing with besides the idea of movies in general.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
18% Woodshock (2017) There are a lot of half-complete ideas among the sisters' jumble of imagery, but trying to tie them together is a fitfully enjoyable, if ultimately fruitless experience.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
75% Gaga: Five Foot Two (2017) Anyone who doesn't have a Little Monster's encyclopedic knowledge might feel a little emotionally lost.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
88% First They Killed My Father (2017) Amid all the important facts, I longed for something unnecessary from the filmmaker, some expressive flourish whose sole purpose isn't just to convey information.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
85% It (2017) This new It has more on its mind, and gives more body and voice to King's ideas of childhood anxieties and the corrosive power of fear.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Sep 8, 2017
84% Beach Rats (2017) Hittman's skill as an impressionistic filmmaker, giving us enough glimpses that we can fill in the whole, makes for an incredibly engaging viewing experience.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Aug 24, 2017
40% The Hitman's Bodyguard (2017) The whole film feels slightly grubby and low-res, like it's been languishing in private mode on the filmmakers' pre-HD YouTube page since 2008.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2017
77% Crown Heights (2017) Crown Heights is as razor-sharp and focused on its historical context and the byzantine workings of the system it takes place in as its increasingly sobered leads.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
58% Lemon (2017) It's the work of a filmmaker who has been honing her own jarring, idiosyncratic sense of rhythm and character for years. As a debut feature, it feels auspicious; as a snapshot of a masculine emergency, it feels timeless.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Aug 16, 2017
69% Annabelle: Creation (2017) It's proof that slower doesn't always mean better in horror.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2017
49% The Glass Castle (2017) It wants you to know that all this more or less really did happen; it also can't help but attempt to tie an emotional bow around the messiness of real life, and to offer a heartwarming thesis about a childhood that was clearly full of contradictions.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Aug 10, 2017
86% Ingrid Goes West (2017) Such a vivid and minute portrait of our boho-chic, mid-century modern, reclaimed wood, custom typography, shrub-swilling, microgreens-on-heirloom-quinoa moment that the characters can be outlines, and it doesn't really affect the ride.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2017
78% An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth To Power (2017) For those of us who need no convincing of the truth of man-made climate change, but find the problem too paralyzingly abstract, Gore's workmanlike methods are both fascinating, encouraging, and, yes, even a little exciting.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Aug 4, 2017
95% Step (2017) There are many films that attempt to illuminate the world through pain, but Step is most instructive in its moments of joy.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Aug 4, 2017
38% Kidnap (2017) There are late-summer films that impress with how far beyond their B-movie calling they dare to go; Kidnap does exactly the job it came to do and clocks out, not particularly caring whether or not you remember it in an hour.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Aug 3, 2017
85% The Incredible Jessica James (2017) Above all else, it's a strong argument for Jessica Williams, former Daily Show breakout, as a cinematic avatar for a certain kind of city-dwelling, creative 20-something.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2017
9% The Emoji Movie (2017) It is one of the darkest, most dismaying films I have ever seen, much less one ostensibly made for children.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jul 27, 2017
79% Brigsby Bear (2017) Brigsby Bear will inevitably be sold as an oh-so-random stoner cult movie, but what Mooney and McCary are getting at, with this nothing-if-not-original story of how mythologies shape us, is something uncomfortably real and of the moment.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jul 25, 2017
74% Landline (2017) I've argued before that Slate should be the queen of modern-day rom-coms, if such a position was open. Add Landline to the evidence pile.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2017
89% Girls Trip (2017) Girls Trip is a very good time.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2017
17% Wish Upon (2017) A deeply silly midsummer lark that makes up for the fact that it's about nothing by being incredibly entertaining.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jul 13, 2017
17% The House (2017) All these performers are given decent setups, but the script loses interest in anything that starts to look like a comedic through line.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2017
15% Transformers: The Last Knight (2017) I can barely summon a feeling about The Last Knight; if anything, I feel slightly worried about how little I hated it.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jun 23, 2017
98% The Big Sick (2017) The Big Sick becomes a story rarely explored or romanticized on film, about what it's like to bond with the parents of the person you're in love with.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jun 21, 2017
18% All Eyez on Me (2017) All Eyez on Me is rarely more than a faithful adaptation of the rapper's Wikipedia entry, so fixated on name-checking every footnote of Shakur's public life that there is no space to explore the experience of the man himself.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2017
21% The Book of Henry (2017) It does not suffice to call The Book of Henry bad; it's nonfunctional, so poorly conceived from the ground up as to slip out of the grasp of the usual standards one applies to narrative film.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017