Rory O'Connor

Rory O'Connor
Rory O'Connor's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Film Stage CineVue
Publications: The Film Stage, CineVue

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
B 91% Leap of Faith (2019) Any fan of that still shocking, still brilliant piece of work will find plenty to savor here. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2020
B 83% Giants Being Lonely (2019) Giants introduces a strong new voice in American independent filmmaking. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2020
B+ 74% Family Romance, LLC (2020) It's as if Herzog has made a narrative film based off a documentary film that doesn't exist, which is obviously an entirely Herzogian thing to do. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 21, 2020
B+ 98% Fourteen (2020) A deep dive into the complexity and soft trauma of seeing those we idolized as kids through fresh eyes and what exactly to make of that new vantage. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 29, 2020
B 100% Driveways (2020) It isn't easy making a film like Driveways stand out. We have walked these streets so often before. We know the twists and turns. We expect the darker corners. Yet stand out is exactly what Driveways does. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 8, 2020
A- 85% DAU. Natasha (2020) We know it's not real, but what does real even mean anymore? It is a staggering film; one that defies categorization and a unique achievement that must be seen to be believed. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 29, 2020
B- 100% Days (Rizi) (2020) It will sound like sacrilege, but Days could be the rare case of a Tsai Ming-liang film that doesn't ever quite connect up and one that might even benefit from some cutting back. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2020
B+ 100% The Woman Who Ran (2020) It also finds the director at his most self-referential-and while that nudging awareness can occasionally play like a trite in-joke, it seldom fails to endear. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
B- No Score Yet Funny Face (2020) What Funny Face lacks in social commentary, however, it makes up for in mood. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2020
B 83% Undine (2020) Playfully comic and surrealist but still hard-wired to one of cinema's fundamental truths: when done right, it remains simply irresistible to watch beautiful people in close-up falling in love. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2020
B 71% Swimming Out Till the Sea Turns Blue (2020) Jia will enter his fifth decade this May, and with all its clear-eyed nostalgia, Swimming Out does feel like the work of someone of the cusp of such a milestone. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2020
A- 96% Birds of Passage (Pájaros de verano) (2019) As effectively violent and entertaining as Birds may be, there is a real current of bitterness and tragedy running through it. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
B 77% An Officer and a Spy (J'accuse) (2019) It's not difficult to see the director finding some kind of warped kinship with his subject. Take from that what you will. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2019
B 89% Ema (2019) It is the symphonic mood that makes Ema such a compelling watch. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
B 71% The King (2019) A compelling and significant central performance from Chalamet-who frankly hasn't had to carry a film in quite this way before. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2019
B+ 41% The Laundromat (2019) All credit to Soderbergh's frequent screenwriter Scott Z. Burns, who has done a fine job of translating Jake Bernstein's dense non-fiction account of the fiasco into such a zippy, cinematic trip. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 1, 2019
B 68% Joker (2019) Phoenix's committed performance is equal parts Freddie Quell, Joe from You Were Never Really Here, Fred Astaire, and Rupert Pupkin, all crossed-over intensity, flailing limbs, and physical comedy. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 1, 2019
A- 94% Marriage Story (2019) Marriage Story shows Baumbach reaching an entirely new level in his most consummate film to date. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2019
B- 83% Ad Astra (2019) It's a deeply personal film about human nature from a beloved filmmaker who has been given the largest canvas imaginable-with all the trimmings-that ultimately proves a bit of a slog. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 29, 2019
A- 98% Varda by Agnès (2019) It is a swan song but not a melancholy tune, more a joyous celebratory coda to the director's life and work, a film that feels purpose-built to dispel any notions of solemnity around her passing. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 19, 2019
A- 96% I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians (Îmi este indiferent daca în istorie vom intra ca barbari) (2019) Jude's reproduction of the on-set vibe-presented almost as a pseudo-documentary-produces genuine narrative dynamism (think Day for Night or A Cock and Bull Story). - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2019
B 81% Light of My life (2019) Affleck has always been a wonderfully understated performer and he has taken that minimalist approach with him behind the camera. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2019
3/5 79% Out Stealing Horses (Ut og Stjæle Hester) (2020) Hans Petter Moland is a peculiarity... On the evidence of his latest effort, titled Out Stealing Horses, the director has not lost that taste for baroque imagery and storytelling. - CineVue EDIT
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019
3/5 53% The Golden Glove (Der goldene handschuh) (2019) Were it not for these overwrought provocations, The Golden Glove could have been Akin's most accomplished work in years. Aesthetically speaking it remains a marvel. - CineVue EDIT
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019
4/5 92% Monos (2019) [Monos] is nothing short of an aesthete's dream, a film crammed with visual bravado that at various times echoes Kubrick, Malick, and Coppola's Apocalypse Now. - CineVue EDIT
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019
4/5 87% I Was at Home, But... (Ich war zuhause, aber...) (2020) In another director's hands this might all have been a bit of a slog, but there is a quiet humor and lightness of touch to Schanelec's direction and a self-effacing irony to Aistrid's rambling the saves it from pure maudlinism. - CineVue EDIT
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019
3/5 84% Mr. Jones (2020) Presented in the inescapable grey-brown color grading of such period confections, it is a worthwhile, at times exciting, and ultimately informative effort if perhaps not a great one. - CineVue EDIT
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019
4/5 89% The Souvenir (2019) As heartbreaking as it is acutely observed, Hogg's deep-diving autobiographical film is a beautiful, confessional tell-all about the brief joys and enduring tragedy that helped her find her voice as an artist. - CineVue EDIT
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019
4/5 80% Hellhole (2019) As politically bleak as it is stylistically rigorous, Hellhole is, like Code Unknown, a film about how big cities squish us together without ever considering the consequences. - CineVue EDIT
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019
B+ 85% Once Upon a Time In Hollywood (2019) A jarring concoction of ravishing 1960s fetishization and sliding doors "what if" moments that might just be his strangest film yet. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019
C+ 83% The Whistlers (2020) To its detriment, this has the feel of a film that has been constructed in service of one absurd idea. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2019
C+ 58% Frankie (2019) It is a heartfelt and modest work but an oddly languid one, a movie that asks the viewer to dig beneath the awkward, stilted topsoil of uneasy family reunion and find the tangled roots beneath. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2019
A- 90% The Lighthouse (2019) A ghost story drenched in gritty, saltwater-flecked period accuracy, and anchored in cautionary maritime fables, but one with a boozy, amorous, and darkly comic edge. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2019
B 86% Diamantino (2019) The directors' provocative humor finds a softer edge during the hero's lonelier moments. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 1, 2019
B- 82% Sorry Angel (Plaire, aimer et courir vite) (2019) Shot in gorgeous turquoise and cerulean blues by that fine cinematographer, it is often a remarkably beautiful film and, with that suggestion of real experience, an inevitably sad one. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 27, 2019
A 99% Ash Is Purest White (2019) Ash is Purest White is a tremendous, funny, heartbreaking, sprawling vehicle for Zhao, and what a gift it is to see her exploring the furthest reaches of those talents. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2019
A- 61% Vox Lux (2018) Not only a thrilling examination of fame and violence in the 21st century and how the two are intrinsically linked, it might also be 2018's most blistering cinematic provocation this side of Lars von Trier. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2018
A- 61% Sunset (Napszállta) (2019) Sunset is a film awash with such delicious ambiguities, almost to the point of damaging its basic cogency at times... Yet the ambiguous will always face such early criticisms and I not only plan on seeing Sunset again; I will relish the challenge. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2018
D 80% 22 July (2018) A crass and careless movie. Avoid at all costs. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 7, 2018
B+ 84% Monrovia, Indiana (2018) It's hard to think of another filmmaker with the same priceless ability to show life, in all its mad variety and with such clarity, on-and more importantly to-both sides. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2018
B 66% Peterloo (2019) If audiences are prepared to sit up straight, take in an opening dialectic, and forgive the understandable shortcomings of some performers, there are many important, fascinating, and devastating truths to be found here. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 3, 2018
B+ 79% At Eternity's Gate (2018) In its rupture from traditional biographical narratives, it does not merely stand out as unconventional biopic-it also comes close to resuscitating the idea of cinema as moving pictures. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 3, 2018
C 64% The Mountain (2019) As visually overcast as it is emotionally dead-eyed, The Mountain is probably the most intentionally-and unwarrantedly-bleak film you're likely to see in 2018. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 2, 2018
B+ 90% The Ballad of Buster Scruggs (2018) A ravishing if wildly uneven addition to the Coens' catalogue. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 1, 2018
B+ 65% Suspiria (2018) A lavish, kitsch-porn piece of (admittedly) not particularly scary macabre horror that bears the director's signature aesthetic stamp while staying true to the original in many ways. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 1, 2018
B+ 96% Roma (2018) Roma is a return to more earthly delights for Cuarón but no less effort has been made by the filmmaker (nor less practical wizardry employed) to offer the viewer a sensory experience of the characters' lives. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2018
2/5 33% Fahrenheit 451 (2018) The result is a cluttered and remarkably misjudged film that shoots for -- and will no doubt miss -- the YA audience. - SciFiNow EDIT
Read More | Posted May 16, 2018
B 96% BlacKkKlansman (2018) BlacKkKlansman seldom ever channels that rage. Instead we are presented with a perfectly decent comedy that will be accessible enough for a wide mainstream audience. Fair enough. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted May 16, 2018
A 90% John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection (L'empire de la perfection) (2018) Faraut lingers on his subject to show the work put in for each point and the resulting array of human emotion is astonishing. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2018
B+ 80% Unsane (2018) Unsane - which is essentially a b-movie in many respects - is arguably the first psychological horror of the #MeToo era. - The Film Stage EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2018