Victoria Segal Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Victoria Segal

Victoria Segal
Victoria Segal's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Sunday Times (UK), New Statesman

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
87% Broken Flowers (2005) ... Broken Flowers, coming from a postcode of its own, doesn't quite deliver.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
76% Match Point (2005) His first film set in London, it boasts a young, pretty, something-for-everyone cast. As enter-tainment, however, it just slams limply into the net every time.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
60% Shopgirl (2005) For most women, finding a pair of black gloves on their doorstep would signal "Boston Strangler" rather than "man of my dreams!" and it is this sense of unintentional creepiness that asphyxiates Shopgirl.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
77% Munich (2005) Munich's passion is clear, its intention good, the skill behind it immense; there is something brave about its decision to take politics into the multiplex.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
68% North Country (2005) Yet Theron's steady performance allows you to see something in Josey that baulks at her victim status.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
83% Walk the Line (2005) Not only does the film show just how hungry Cash was to sing his songs, it understands how hungry society was for the cataclysmic changes such music brought.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
62% Proof (2005) ... Proof seems like no more than a fraction of a cinematic experience, a string of emotional calculations that fails to provide a satisfying solution.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
93% Good Night, And Good Luck (2005) Shorn of flash and dazzle in a way Murrow would appreciate, Good Night, and Good Luck practises what it preaches. It might be the result of wires and lights in a box, but it feels like a slice of life.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
90% Capote (2005) Unfortunately, by the end of it, Capote isn't the only one who wants to turn to drink.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
73% Syriana (2005) ... If you can avoid getting too hung up on the details, Syriana is a brave attempt to blitz the goody-baddy dynamics of cold-war film-making and concentrate on the ambiguities of modern geopolitics.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
86% L'Enfant (2006) L'Enfant shows a world that remains under the radar for most people, yet proves that growing up - however long it takes - is anything but child's play.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
No Score Yet Kidulthood (2008) For all the filth and fury, Kidulthood is ultimately a moral film - perhaps a bit too moral, if the children's film workshop ending is anything to go by.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
73% V for Vendetta (2006) By leaping into fantasy and heading for its own version of a happy ending with all guns blazing, however, it blows the competition - not to mention the Houses of Parliament - out of the water.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
77% Transamerica (2006) ... ultimately, it is about the primacy of family and friends, and how decency begets decency.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
No Score Yet Shooting Dogs (Beyond the Gates) (2007) This is Rwanda's Killing Fields - a hideous story observed with an unflinching eye.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
46% Rent (2005) Chris Columbus, who managed to suck the magic out of the first two Harry Potter films, does the same with this adaptation.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
89% Paradise Now (2005) ... it has the great advantage of letting an audience feel it is seeing things it would otherwise never see.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
41% American Dreamz (2006) [Director Paul Weitz] daringly explores various kinds of nihilism, comparing the self-obliterating nature of both extremism and fame.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
74% Glastonbury (2007) Too long, with too many shots of hands-in-the-air ravers and too much Damien Hirst, Glastonbury is still hugely evocative... ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
97% Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room (2005) ... Enron: the smartest guys in the room pinpoints a moment when corporate morality was shredded like so many tonnes of incriminating documents in a big business run by small, small men.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
89% The Devil and Daniel Johnston (2006) ... really more about the tragic effects of madness than the glory of art.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
75% Black Sun (2005) ... this art-fully fractured film is more interested in his enduring artistic impulses than in any clichéd "testament to the human spirit".‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
93% Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price (2005) Yet, despite the inherent lack of suspense in this "bad corporation!" genre... Robert Greenwald's documentary still generates enough jaw-dropping revelations to make it more than just an exercise in confirming anti-globalisation prejudices.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
80% Brick (2006) Brick is quotable, clever and cryptic... ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
25% The Da Vinci Code (2006) By the end, the film degenerates into wishy-washy relativism of the school that says "the only thing that matters is what you believe", a real cop-out after the hectic Grail quest preceding it.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
90% United 93 (2006) What might be therapeutic for the families is not perhaps meant for public consumption. After all, few things are more private than the last minutes of a life.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
100% Not Here To Be Loved (2007) Broadly speaking, Not Here to Be Loved is a romantic comedy, though the romance is tortuous and the comedy tentative.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
88% Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005) For the first time, adults might actually enjoy a Harry Potter film as much as children.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Dec 8, 2014