Mirage Reviews

  • Nov 25, 2020

    Peck must have had déjà vu filming this one, with its similarities to Spellbound twenty years earlier. Manhattan businessman seems to have amnesia while being chased by killers. But is he really a businessman, and are his fragmented memories trustworthy? Production is a bit clunky but has good moments.

    Peck must have had déjà vu filming this one, with its similarities to Spellbound twenty years earlier. Manhattan businessman seems to have amnesia while being chased by killers. But is he really a businessman, and are his fragmented memories trustworthy? Production is a bit clunky but has good moments.

  • Jan 04, 2020

    Terrific but under appreciated 60s thriller. Is it a coincidence that it was in theaters shortly after the big New England blackout?

    Terrific but under appreciated 60s thriller. Is it a coincidence that it was in theaters shortly after the big New England blackout?

  • Aug 04, 2018

    Interesting but not compelling. After an office party, David Stillwell discovers that he has no memory of certain people, people who should be familiar to him, or of anything about his life from more than two years previously. Then he discovers that the same night his boss, the famous businessman and philanthropist Charles Calvin, committed suicide by jumping out of his office window. Now some violent thugs are out to get him. They work for a shadowy figure known simply as The Major. Interesting, but not compelling. The plot has a Hitchcockian feel to it, but the movie lacks a few things to get into Hitchcock's league. The plot isn't watertight and often feels contrived. Things happen rather conveniently and sometimes without much plausibility. Director Edward Dmytryck doesn't really build the suspense well (Hitchcock was superb at this) and the movie seems to just be on auto-pilot at times. This said, it is reasonably intriguing. Gregory Peck puts in a solid performance as Stillwell though at times seems miscast, especially during the tough-guy scenes. Good supporting cast which includes Walter Matthau and George Kennedy.

    Interesting but not compelling. After an office party, David Stillwell discovers that he has no memory of certain people, people who should be familiar to him, or of anything about his life from more than two years previously. Then he discovers that the same night his boss, the famous businessman and philanthropist Charles Calvin, committed suicide by jumping out of his office window. Now some violent thugs are out to get him. They work for a shadowy figure known simply as The Major. Interesting, but not compelling. The plot has a Hitchcockian feel to it, but the movie lacks a few things to get into Hitchcock's league. The plot isn't watertight and often feels contrived. Things happen rather conveniently and sometimes without much plausibility. Director Edward Dmytryck doesn't really build the suspense well (Hitchcock was superb at this) and the movie seems to just be on auto-pilot at times. This said, it is reasonably intriguing. Gregory Peck puts in a solid performance as Stillwell though at times seems miscast, especially during the tough-guy scenes. Good supporting cast which includes Walter Matthau and George Kennedy.

  • Jun 04, 2018

    I think Mirage might be the most interesting use of amnesia I’ve ever seen in a film. They utilize what is usually one of the most played-out tropes in Hollywood to create a believable story with mystery and intrigue, instead of the same old “hit on the head” nonsense you see in most movies. I’m still not convinced that this is an accurate depiction of how amnesia works, but it sounded somewhat scientific when the psychiatrist talked about it, so I was willing to go with the movie. I loved trying to unwrap the puzzle of what was happening and seeking to discover if these things that we’ve been shown were real or false memories. That’s one of the coolest choices that they made with Mirage, they gave us the perspective of Gregory Peck’s character so we will feel equally disoriented and confused until memory is restored. It reminded me of the way that Christopher Nolan manipulates the audience in Memento in order to keep us off-balance and desperate to figure out what’s going on. This film isn’t quite on the same level of brilliance as that one for me, but it’s still a great way of formatting the narrative of the story. Gregory Peck is great in the lead role because he has a demeanor that makes you think he is the most put-together guy in the room. That results in a greater impact when he is actually wrong and didn’t know what he was talking about. The rest of the cast was also solid, but the standout for me was Walter Matthau. I always love seeing him appear in movies, and his scenes with Peck were my favorite by far. I wish there was more of him in the film to be honest. There were a couple of things that didn’t quite work for me in Mirage. For one, I’m not sure everyone’s behavior made sense based on the final reveal and the way Peck was acting. I particularly had a problem reconciling how Diane Baker behaves throughout the film, and I wonder if it would make sense if I re-watched it. I also thought the truth of what happened struggled to live up to the setup of all that came before. I was hoping for a more dramatic conspiracy that would help put more of the pieces into place for me. Otherwise, Mirage was a marvelous film with tons of excitement and mystery which was all I wanted from it.

    I think Mirage might be the most interesting use of amnesia I’ve ever seen in a film. They utilize what is usually one of the most played-out tropes in Hollywood to create a believable story with mystery and intrigue, instead of the same old “hit on the head” nonsense you see in most movies. I’m still not convinced that this is an accurate depiction of how amnesia works, but it sounded somewhat scientific when the psychiatrist talked about it, so I was willing to go with the movie. I loved trying to unwrap the puzzle of what was happening and seeking to discover if these things that we’ve been shown were real or false memories. That’s one of the coolest choices that they made with Mirage, they gave us the perspective of Gregory Peck’s character so we will feel equally disoriented and confused until memory is restored. It reminded me of the way that Christopher Nolan manipulates the audience in Memento in order to keep us off-balance and desperate to figure out what’s going on. This film isn’t quite on the same level of brilliance as that one for me, but it’s still a great way of formatting the narrative of the story. Gregory Peck is great in the lead role because he has a demeanor that makes you think he is the most put-together guy in the room. That results in a greater impact when he is actually wrong and didn’t know what he was talking about. The rest of the cast was also solid, but the standout for me was Walter Matthau. I always love seeing him appear in movies, and his scenes with Peck were my favorite by far. I wish there was more of him in the film to be honest. There were a couple of things that didn’t quite work for me in Mirage. For one, I’m not sure everyone’s behavior made sense based on the final reveal and the way Peck was acting. I particularly had a problem reconciling how Diane Baker behaves throughout the film, and I wonder if it would make sense if I re-watched it. I also thought the truth of what happened struggled to live up to the setup of all that came before. I was hoping for a more dramatic conspiracy that would help put more of the pieces into place for me. Otherwise, Mirage was a marvelous film with tons of excitement and mystery which was all I wanted from it.

  • Apr 18, 2017

    Nearly noir, and intriguing. A bit weak at the end and Diane is under utilized. Not exactly the right film title, but it'll do. Intriguing ... !

    Nearly noir, and intriguing. A bit weak at the end and Diane is under utilized. Not exactly the right film title, but it'll do. Intriguing ... !

  • Jul 21, 2015

    "If you're not committed to anything, you're just taking up space!"

    "If you're not committed to anything, you're just taking up space!"

  • Apr 20, 2015

    Fun Hitchcockian thriller with a Hitchcockian lead by Peck. Great supporting cast helps propel the story along, Weston is fantastic as a hitman and Matthau is his usual sterling self as a repairman turned PI.

    Fun Hitchcockian thriller with a Hitchcockian lead by Peck. Great supporting cast helps propel the story along, Weston is fantastic as a hitman and Matthau is his usual sterling self as a repairman turned PI.

  • Apr 19, 2015

    B-level Hitchcockian thriller that is fine, but not essential viewing.

    B-level Hitchcockian thriller that is fine, but not essential viewing.

  • Apr 16, 2015

    Good but not Hitchcock.

    Good but not Hitchcock.

  • Apr 12, 2015

    dark n dazzling thriller plus ive seen all Peck pixxxxx

    dark n dazzling thriller plus ive seen all Peck pixxxxx