Black Widow Reviews

  • Dec 01, 2019

    Some spotty clever dialogue here and there, but the pacing is terrible. I sense it was trying to be another "All About Eve" but clearly missed.

    Some spotty clever dialogue here and there, but the pacing is terrible. I sense it was trying to be another "All About Eve" but clearly missed.

  • Jul 19, 2019

    saw most of it 7.2019 on tv. Gene tierney. Ginger rodgers looked very good. movie kind of tedious , but i finally got into it. Not sure why they called it BLACK WIDOW.

    saw most of it 7.2019 on tv. Gene tierney. Ginger rodgers looked very good. movie kind of tedious , but i finally got into it. Not sure why they called it BLACK WIDOW.

  • Aug 19, 2017

    This film did have me guessing but...film felt "off" in many ways. It should have been shot in black and white...that would have helped set the tone perhaps. If this just comes on and you want a mystery from the 50's it will work but it is nothing to get too excited about..

    This film did have me guessing but...film felt "off" in many ways. It should have been shot in black and white...that would have helped set the tone perhaps. If this just comes on and you want a mystery from the 50's it will work but it is nothing to get too excited about..

  • Apr 09, 2017

    Enjoyable who dun it little twist at end.

    Enjoyable who dun it little twist at end.

  • Sep 17, 2015

    Passable technicolor "noir" that finds Van Heflin the gullible Broadway producer who finds out that his kind gesture and Platonic friendship toward a young female writer is misinterpreted by everyone, including the police (led by smooth George Raft), when she is found dead in his apartment, an apparent suicide. Of course, Van's famous actress wife Gene Tierney had been out of town and the tabloids also accuse him of infidelity. The only way to escape his fate is to flee the police and solve the case on his own (as you do). Ginger Rogers and Reginald Gardiner provide "support" as the star of Heflin's latest Broadway smash and her kept husband. Generally enjoyable (due to the acting) but with that over-produced 1950s feel and a plot that is both too easy to figure out and also designed for a bit too much grandstanding from Ginger Rogers. Gene Tierney in contrast has far too little to do. There are 50 or so real film noirs you should see before this one.

    Passable technicolor "noir" that finds Van Heflin the gullible Broadway producer who finds out that his kind gesture and Platonic friendship toward a young female writer is misinterpreted by everyone, including the police (led by smooth George Raft), when she is found dead in his apartment, an apparent suicide. Of course, Van's famous actress wife Gene Tierney had been out of town and the tabloids also accuse him of infidelity. The only way to escape his fate is to flee the police and solve the case on his own (as you do). Ginger Rogers and Reginald Gardiner provide "support" as the star of Heflin's latest Broadway smash and her kept husband. Generally enjoyable (due to the acting) but with that over-produced 1950s feel and a plot that is both too easy to figure out and also designed for a bit too much grandstanding from Ginger Rogers. Gene Tierney in contrast has far too little to do. There are 50 or so real film noirs you should see before this one.

  • Aug 09, 2015

    I'm usually a sucker for writer/director Nunnally Johnson's melodramas, whether it's "Man in the Grey Flannel Suit" or "The Three Faces of Eve," but this one was kind of lifeless and just didn't grab me. It could be because Van Heflin was the lead and he always struck me as a rather uncompelling onscreen presence. The story here has married Broadway producer Heflin becoming something of a mentor a young female write, who ends up dead in his apartment with Heflin as the primary suspect. The movie is handsomely filmed in CinemaScope and there is a good supporting cast that includes Ginger Rogers, Gene Tierney, George Raft and Otto Kruger, but the overall film is pretty dull.

    I'm usually a sucker for writer/director Nunnally Johnson's melodramas, whether it's "Man in the Grey Flannel Suit" or "The Three Faces of Eve," but this one was kind of lifeless and just didn't grab me. It could be because Van Heflin was the lead and he always struck me as a rather uncompelling onscreen presence. The story here has married Broadway producer Heflin becoming something of a mentor a young female write, who ends up dead in his apartment with Heflin as the primary suspect. The movie is handsomely filmed in CinemaScope and there is a good supporting cast that includes Ginger Rogers, Gene Tierney, George Raft and Otto Kruger, but the overall film is pretty dull.

  • Apr 02, 2013

    3: It's very strange to see a 50's noir in Technicolor cinemascope. It just doesn't quite seem to compute. However, it is an excellent film with all the requisite intrigue and plot twists. There is nothing particularly memorable about the picture, it is simply one of those excellent genre pictures that seem to have been pushed out like clockwork back in the day.

    3: It's very strange to see a 50's noir in Technicolor cinemascope. It just doesn't quite seem to compute. However, it is an excellent film with all the requisite intrigue and plot twists. There is nothing particularly memorable about the picture, it is simply one of those excellent genre pictures that seem to have been pushed out like clockwork back in the day.

  • Mar 06, 2013

    Fading stars breathe life into artificial murder mystery set on Broadway--Well-acted, well-upholstered soap opera/murder mystery!!

    Fading stars breathe life into artificial murder mystery set on Broadway--Well-acted, well-upholstered soap opera/murder mystery!!

  • Dec 26, 2012

    good mysteey & late career ginger rogers.

    good mysteey & late career ginger rogers.

  • May 02, 2012

    Decent, had me guessing up until the end, but there doesn't feel like there's anything to set it apart from a standard mystery.

    Decent, had me guessing up until the end, but there doesn't feel like there's anything to set it apart from a standard mystery.