1985 Reviews

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    Alec B Super Reviewer
    6d ago

    Cliched in some respects but it is still undeniably moving because of the performances.

    Cliched in some respects but it is still undeniably moving because of the performances.

  • May 15, 2021

    A confronting faux black and white movie. I came of age as gay in the 2000's and the family and religious rejection almost killed me. If I was born a couple of decades earlier, even if I had survived my teenage years, I almost could well have contracted HIV and died. This movie hits hard. But that's because I see myself in the story. The slowness of the early parts of the movie might seem unjustified if you can't understand the pressure of being gay in a christian household. But I think it's justified. I think it's a great movie. If you like this one, you might like The Normal Heart (2014)

    A confronting faux black and white movie. I came of age as gay in the 2000's and the family and religious rejection almost killed me. If I was born a couple of decades earlier, even if I had survived my teenage years, I almost could well have contracted HIV and died. This movie hits hard. But that's because I see myself in the story. The slowness of the early parts of the movie might seem unjustified if you can't understand the pressure of being gay in a christian household. But I think it's justified. I think it's a great movie. If you like this one, you might like The Normal Heart (2014)

  • Aug 19, 2020

    Interesting movie and very subtle in style. I would have liked to see the movie in color.

    Interesting movie and very subtle in style. I would have liked to see the movie in color.

  • Jul 27, 2020

    Simply an amazing film.

    Simply an amazing film.

  • May 07, 2020

    The trajectory of this story involving a closeted man returning to his religious parents home for Christmas after a three year absence begins to look like a foreseeable one. Right at that moment, writer and director Yen Tan adopts a much more subtle and tender approach to the secrets his central character is harbouring, resulting in a powerful and achingly beautiful film shot entirely in black and white.

    The trajectory of this story involving a closeted man returning to his religious parents home for Christmas after a three year absence begins to look like a foreseeable one. Right at that moment, writer and director Yen Tan adopts a much more subtle and tender approach to the secrets his central character is harbouring, resulting in a powerful and achingly beautiful film shot entirely in black and white.

  • Aug 24, 2019

    Really nice bittersweet slice of life. The actors sparkle subtly. Unfortunately the standup comedy scenes flop, as usual when portrayed in tv or film. Steady, slow pacer but worth a look.

    Really nice bittersweet slice of life. The actors sparkle subtly. Unfortunately the standup comedy scenes flop, as usual when portrayed in tv or film. Steady, slow pacer but worth a look.

  • Apr 30, 2019

    1985 is a small, quiet gem of a film. Starkly honest and genuine in its pure emotion. Set in 1985 (surprise, surprise), it's a small family drama set in Fort Worth, Texas. Oldest son Adrian returns home for Christmas from New York. He has been absent for three years as he finds it hard to fit in with his conservative, deeply religious family. Especially his very strict and domineering father. Without giving too much away we slowly learn that Adrian is gay and has some hidden pain to tell his family, which is of obvious difficulty for him. We also see him interact with his younger impressionable brother and his long time childhood friend. It's a very subtle film that focuses on the strands of family life and the strains that impinge it. It's not histrionic or melodramatic at all, giving us a wonderful portrait of family life. Shot in grainy black and white with superb performances this is a film that gives a lot in its dignity and poignancy.

    1985 is a small, quiet gem of a film. Starkly honest and genuine in its pure emotion. Set in 1985 (surprise, surprise), it's a small family drama set in Fort Worth, Texas. Oldest son Adrian returns home for Christmas from New York. He has been absent for three years as he finds it hard to fit in with his conservative, deeply religious family. Especially his very strict and domineering father. Without giving too much away we slowly learn that Adrian is gay and has some hidden pain to tell his family, which is of obvious difficulty for him. We also see him interact with his younger impressionable brother and his long time childhood friend. It's a very subtle film that focuses on the strands of family life and the strains that impinge it. It's not histrionic or melodramatic at all, giving us a wonderful portrait of family life. Shot in grainy black and white with superb performances this is a film that gives a lot in its dignity and poignancy.

  • Apr 25, 2019

    Remarkable. Gut wrenching. Cut deep into me as I relived my own experiences with the same issues with my family as I sat and watched them played out in front of me.

    Remarkable. Gut wrenching. Cut deep into me as I relived my own experiences with the same issues with my family as I sat and watched them played out in front of me.

  • Apr 08, 2019

    Well done story of the early AIDS crisis, but painful to watch for those of us who lost so many friends who had tough times with their blood flamilies. .

    Well done story of the early AIDS crisis, but painful to watch for those of us who lost so many friends who had tough times with their blood flamilies. .

  • Feb 10, 2019

    With such a weighty topic, it was weird to me to have it all in black and white and for it to labor on the way it did. The film let all the conflicts arise - but seemed unfulfilling in its resolution to him dancing in a club at the end. Had an 'it gets better' message that then asked, "better for what?"

    With such a weighty topic, it was weird to me to have it all in black and white and for it to labor on the way it did. The film let all the conflicts arise - but seemed unfulfilling in its resolution to him dancing in a club at the end. Had an 'it gets better' message that then asked, "better for what?"