A Safe Place Reviews

  • Aug 31, 2019

    Pretentious, pointless, meaningless garbage that will seem twice as long as the 92 minutes if you should try and watch this. There are some movies I consider among the worst films ever made. And this joins them, but with the others, I am rejecting either incredibly bad acting, or an attempt at audience manipulation, or a terrible ending, story or moral in them; there IS no story in this. There is no MEANING in this mess. It's up to you but I say avoid at all costs. I have seen movies that have bored me - but at least they had a story to follow. This is one of the most worthless films ever made.

    Pretentious, pointless, meaningless garbage that will seem twice as long as the 92 minutes if you should try and watch this. There are some movies I consider among the worst films ever made. And this joins them, but with the others, I am rejecting either incredibly bad acting, or an attempt at audience manipulation, or a terrible ending, story or moral in them; there IS no story in this. There is no MEANING in this mess. It's up to you but I say avoid at all costs. I have seen movies that have bored me - but at least they had a story to follow. This is one of the most worthless films ever made.

  • Nov 16, 2016

    It doesn't work most of the time and meanders when it should be gripping, but it has its moments.

    It doesn't work most of the time and meanders when it should be gripping, but it has its moments.

  • Sep 01, 2015

    I have no doubt that there is an audience for this sort of film, however I am not part of this audience. I was bored to tears (the tears erupting by consistent yawning). Tuesday Weld was the only reason to keep the disc spinning even though the words she was saying could have been untranslated Russian. Speaking of Russian, Orson Welles' accent is painful. This is the low point of the boxed set.

    I have no doubt that there is an audience for this sort of film, however I am not part of this audience. I was bored to tears (the tears erupting by consistent yawning). Tuesday Weld was the only reason to keep the disc spinning even though the words she was saying could have been untranslated Russian. Speaking of Russian, Orson Welles' accent is painful. This is the low point of the boxed set.

  • Aug 20, 2014

    So, what was all that about?

    So, what was all that about?

  • May 16, 2014

    This movie just could not draw me in. It was disjointed, confusing, and honestly just boring. I'm sure there was something they wanted to get across, but they failed.

    This movie just could not draw me in. It was disjointed, confusing, and honestly just boring. I'm sure there was something they wanted to get across, but they failed.

  • Aug 04, 2013

    A girl's fantasy keeps getting off track of the story and what's trying to get its point across.

    A girl's fantasy keeps getting off track of the story and what's trying to get its point across.

  • Apr 15, 2013

    After watching this once and then watching it with commentary I now have a deep seeded connection with this movie. I could write a long essay about it. It premiered at the same time as The Last Picture Show, even in the same theater. The Last Picture Show is also one of my favorites of the BBS movies. The Last Picture Show was a huge success while A Safe Place was a huge failure. The movie is not a linear storyline that can be followed like a normal movie. It's something to be followed on an emotional level. It is a perfect example of a movie that is probably taking place inside of someone's head. All of the scenes are blended together and there is a dreamlike surreality to everything. I was reminded of A Catcher in the Rye when I watched it the first time, only hints of the book though. Then I watch it with commentary and find out that Henry Jaglom said that book, and Salinger, were a big influence on him. That blew my mind. I didn't really pick up on the connections to the novel, there was just the slightness that reminded me of it and the movie also had other scenes that reminded me of a friend who told me to read the book so I wasn't even thinking the book had anything to do with the movie, just coincidence, but it was no coincidence. I was going on an inside journey of my own while watching this movie twice tonight. There are a few dialogue scenes that are beautiful and then it turns out they weren't written they were real stories told from the people who experienced them. That pureness of a scene is something that is hard to fake. At first I was turned off by the blending of scenes but after finding out the writer/director's intentions it seemed perfectly understandable. I guess I'm one of the few that has some kind of deep seeded connection with this movie and I like it even more because I'm in a minority. The movie reminded me of other movies I have seen, Annie Hall, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless mind to name a couple. The elements of relationships and love and memories that is tossed around really put this movie in the realm of those movies. This will be one movie I will look back on and I'd say it would be one of the movies that made me want to be a film maker. I will be a film maker, I have decided. This is just one of the movies I needed to watch on my journey to becoming one.

    After watching this once and then watching it with commentary I now have a deep seeded connection with this movie. I could write a long essay about it. It premiered at the same time as The Last Picture Show, even in the same theater. The Last Picture Show is also one of my favorites of the BBS movies. The Last Picture Show was a huge success while A Safe Place was a huge failure. The movie is not a linear storyline that can be followed like a normal movie. It's something to be followed on an emotional level. It is a perfect example of a movie that is probably taking place inside of someone's head. All of the scenes are blended together and there is a dreamlike surreality to everything. I was reminded of A Catcher in the Rye when I watched it the first time, only hints of the book though. Then I watch it with commentary and find out that Henry Jaglom said that book, and Salinger, were a big influence on him. That blew my mind. I didn't really pick up on the connections to the novel, there was just the slightness that reminded me of it and the movie also had other scenes that reminded me of a friend who told me to read the book so I wasn't even thinking the book had anything to do with the movie, just coincidence, but it was no coincidence. I was going on an inside journey of my own while watching this movie twice tonight. There are a few dialogue scenes that are beautiful and then it turns out they weren't written they were real stories told from the people who experienced them. That pureness of a scene is something that is hard to fake. At first I was turned off by the blending of scenes but after finding out the writer/director's intentions it seemed perfectly understandable. I guess I'm one of the few that has some kind of deep seeded connection with this movie and I like it even more because I'm in a minority. The movie reminded me of other movies I have seen, Annie Hall, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless mind to name a couple. The elements of relationships and love and memories that is tossed around really put this movie in the realm of those movies. This will be one movie I will look back on and I'd say it would be one of the movies that made me want to be a film maker. I will be a film maker, I have decided. This is just one of the movies I needed to watch on my journey to becoming one.

  • May 09, 2012

    Henry Jaglom was a bit actor who was friends with Jack Nicholson. Jaglom had done a play in 1963 called The Uncommon Denominator, and though his connections with Nicholson, he got the opportunity to get it made into a film through BBS Productions. It's maybe the most peculiar film that BBS made, making Head (1968) seem normal, but it's well made though. It focuses on the juxtaposed life pf young woman named Noah (Tuesday Weld), who lives alone in New York, but also hangs out with fellow flower children. She's had some sort of tragedy or trauma in her life, and she's unable to truly grow up. She retreats to her memories, a mish-mash fantasy land where she's a girl named Susan. She spends her time hanging out with a mysterious Yiddish magician (Orson Welles). But, we also see 'Susan' romantically involved with two men from different ends of the spectrum, there's Fred (Phil Proctor), who's a useful man but very dull, and then there's Mitch (Nicholson), who is suave and sexy, the latter is seemingly perfect, but neither Fred nor Mitch are able to satisfy 'Susan' and she grows bored and goes off into her own world. It's a very weird film, almost like a fantasy film but it's grounded in the real world, Jaglom describes it as Fellini meets Cassavettes. True, but it doesn't seem to go anywhere, and there's a sense of pretentiousness about it, despite good intentions. Over 50 hours of footage was shot, maybe there's another more interesting film to be made with that.

    Henry Jaglom was a bit actor who was friends with Jack Nicholson. Jaglom had done a play in 1963 called The Uncommon Denominator, and though his connections with Nicholson, he got the opportunity to get it made into a film through BBS Productions. It's maybe the most peculiar film that BBS made, making Head (1968) seem normal, but it's well made though. It focuses on the juxtaposed life pf young woman named Noah (Tuesday Weld), who lives alone in New York, but also hangs out with fellow flower children. She's had some sort of tragedy or trauma in her life, and she's unable to truly grow up. She retreats to her memories, a mish-mash fantasy land where she's a girl named Susan. She spends her time hanging out with a mysterious Yiddish magician (Orson Welles). But, we also see 'Susan' romantically involved with two men from different ends of the spectrum, there's Fred (Phil Proctor), who's a useful man but very dull, and then there's Mitch (Nicholson), who is suave and sexy, the latter is seemingly perfect, but neither Fred nor Mitch are able to satisfy 'Susan' and she grows bored and goes off into her own world. It's a very weird film, almost like a fantasy film but it's grounded in the real world, Jaglom describes it as Fellini meets Cassavettes. True, but it doesn't seem to go anywhere, and there's a sense of pretentiousness about it, despite good intentions. Over 50 hours of footage was shot, maybe there's another more interesting film to be made with that.

  • Apr 11, 2012

    This movie is literally the biggest piece of garbage I have seen in a very long time. It is so bad, I had to stop watching after about 45 minutes.

    This movie is literally the biggest piece of garbage I have seen in a very long time. It is so bad, I had to stop watching after about 45 minutes.

  • Feb 06, 2012

    Fractured, repetitive and too artsy for its own good. This movie somehow made an extremely simple story incredibly confusing and sort of frustrating. Not that Head and Drive, He Said were anything to write home about, but A Safe Place is probably the least impressive BBS film. Tuesday Weld and Jack Nicholson are both charismatic and enjoyable, but sadly, Orson Welles is not.

    Fractured, repetitive and too artsy for its own good. This movie somehow made an extremely simple story incredibly confusing and sort of frustrating. Not that Head and Drive, He Said were anything to write home about, but A Safe Place is probably the least impressive BBS film. Tuesday Weld and Jack Nicholson are both charismatic and enjoyable, but sadly, Orson Welles is not.