All That Heaven Allows Reviews

  • Apr 04, 2019

    All That Heaven Allows is rushed in its first act and somewhat unsubtle in execution, but it's still a commendable romance thanks in no small part to its very progressive portrayal of an intergenerational couple and the struggles they faced during this period. It also feels and looks incredibly cozy owing to a beautiful imagery and a charming tone to it. As for Jane Wyman, she carried the entire movie on her shoulders and delivered one of the best performances of this year.

    All That Heaven Allows is rushed in its first act and somewhat unsubtle in execution, but it's still a commendable romance thanks in no small part to its very progressive portrayal of an intergenerational couple and the struggles they faced during this period. It also feels and looks incredibly cozy owing to a beautiful imagery and a charming tone to it. As for Jane Wyman, she carried the entire movie on her shoulders and delivered one of the best performances of this year.

  • Jan 26, 2019

    The best romance movie ever made!

    The best romance movie ever made!

  • Nov 10, 2018

    A perfect and one of the definitive melodramas of the 50's, with the color cinematography that is just overwhelming: it's like a painting rendered alive. You just watch the change of the colors as the mood of emotions flows and changes, it's absolutely adorable, only for that alone it deserves the highest mark. The direction is flawless also, the composition of every scene is perfect, and actors do excellent job, they are living their characters. Special recognition deserves Jane Wyman, her Cary is 100% believable character, she's just as perfect to watch as the cinematography, her doubt and change of thoughts is traceable on her face and in sudden half-movements that are stop dead right at the beginning. A wonderful picture, for all times.

    A perfect and one of the definitive melodramas of the 50's, with the color cinematography that is just overwhelming: it's like a painting rendered alive. You just watch the change of the colors as the mood of emotions flows and changes, it's absolutely adorable, only for that alone it deserves the highest mark. The direction is flawless also, the composition of every scene is perfect, and actors do excellent job, they are living their characters. Special recognition deserves Jane Wyman, her Cary is 100% believable character, she's just as perfect to watch as the cinematography, her doubt and change of thoughts is traceable on her face and in sudden half-movements that are stop dead right at the beginning. A wonderful picture, for all times.

  • Oct 09, 2018

    A good romance film that is carried by two leads that steal the show. I wish the relationship between the two was developed a little more. Other than that, it’s an effective romance that I worth checking out

    A good romance film that is carried by two leads that steal the show. I wish the relationship between the two was developed a little more. Other than that, it’s an effective romance that I worth checking out

  • Dec 28, 2017

    A film from 1955 that in its own way formed the basis of the modern television drama. The love story of a rich, widow Cary Scott (Jane Wyman) discovering love and marriage all over again with her young, working class gardener Ron Kirby (Rock Hudson). It seems like forbidden love especially with the prying eyes and petty meddling of Scott's supposedly grown up children and her rich High Society friends. The film is colour and features excellent sets, compositions and costumes. In fact it's not bad for a 1950s love story. A prehistoric soap opera!

    A film from 1955 that in its own way formed the basis of the modern television drama. The love story of a rich, widow Cary Scott (Jane Wyman) discovering love and marriage all over again with her young, working class gardener Ron Kirby (Rock Hudson). It seems like forbidden love especially with the prying eyes and petty meddling of Scott's supposedly grown up children and her rich High Society friends. The film is colour and features excellent sets, compositions and costumes. In fact it's not bad for a 1950s love story. A prehistoric soap opera!

  • Sep 11, 2017

    The second of 2 movies director Douglas Sirk worked with Rock Hudson and Jane Wyman with the first being the Magnificent Obsession. Wyman plays Carey who is attempting to move on with her life after losing her husband eventually falls for her young gardener, Ron( Rock Hudson) despite their age difference and despite some opposition from both friends and family.

    The second of 2 movies director Douglas Sirk worked with Rock Hudson and Jane Wyman with the first being the Magnificent Obsession. Wyman plays Carey who is attempting to move on with her life after losing her husband eventually falls for her young gardener, Ron( Rock Hudson) despite their age difference and despite some opposition from both friends and family.

  • Jul 24, 2017

    All That Heaven Allows is an incredible film. It is about an upper-class widow who falls in love with a much younger, down-to-earth nurseryman. Jane Wyman and Rock Hudson give fantastic performances. The screenplay is well written. Douglas Sirk did a great job directing this movie. I enjoyed watching this motion picture because of the drama and romance. All That Heaven Allows is a must see.

    All That Heaven Allows is an incredible film. It is about an upper-class widow who falls in love with a much younger, down-to-earth nurseryman. Jane Wyman and Rock Hudson give fantastic performances. The screenplay is well written. Douglas Sirk did a great job directing this movie. I enjoyed watching this motion picture because of the drama and romance. All That Heaven Allows is a must see.

  • Mar 21, 2017

    Set aside all the beautiful visuals and beautiful actors, this is by far one of the most boring film's I've ever seen in my life. Wow. You can all skip this one.

    Set aside all the beautiful visuals and beautiful actors, this is by far one of the most boring film's I've ever seen in my life. Wow. You can all skip this one.

  • Nov 10, 2016

    In this meandering melodrama, a dashing Rock Hudson swoops into a small town to show one status-obsessed mum that there's "more to life than keeping up with the Joneses". The enduring message is perhaps more relevant than ever in today's social net-twerking obsessed shadow of a life. Plus Jane Wyman is breathtaking in the lead role, which she plays like a lost puppy unlucky in love. Add in Louvre-worthy landscapes and lush technicolor and what do you get? A paint-by-numbers romantic classic.

    In this meandering melodrama, a dashing Rock Hudson swoops into a small town to show one status-obsessed mum that there's "more to life than keeping up with the Joneses". The enduring message is perhaps more relevant than ever in today's social net-twerking obsessed shadow of a life. Plus Jane Wyman is breathtaking in the lead role, which she plays like a lost puppy unlucky in love. Add in Louvre-worthy landscapes and lush technicolor and what do you get? A paint-by-numbers romantic classic.

  • Oct 29, 2016

    This classic from Douglas Sirk is just the second film of his I have seen of his, after "Immitation of Life". He is widely know for doing melodramas, that also happen to be beautiful, and with big name stars, but based on these two films at least, he also seems to be delivering strong social commentaries underneath the melodrama. With this film, I had a tough time getting into the film for a while, it at first just seemed like a typical melodrama, but the further I got into the film, the more I started to notice other things, such as the underlying anger Sirk seems to present toward the society that is frowning upon the romance of the two leads, Rock Hudson seen as a lowly gardener and Jane Wyman as the older widower with money and standing. As the anger and underlying commentary became more prominent, things got more interesting for me. In my opinion, there is a clear resentment towards the societal crowd that is ostracizing the two lovers, which seems to me like a rare stance for a 50's film. The other thing I should comment on, and one of the most significant things of the picture, is the gorgeous Technicolor cinematography. Along with "The Red Shoes", this may be the most beautiful film shot in Technicolor. I am not sure that this film will appeal to everyone, but I certainly think it is worth watching.

    This classic from Douglas Sirk is just the second film of his I have seen of his, after "Immitation of Life". He is widely know for doing melodramas, that also happen to be beautiful, and with big name stars, but based on these two films at least, he also seems to be delivering strong social commentaries underneath the melodrama. With this film, I had a tough time getting into the film for a while, it at first just seemed like a typical melodrama, but the further I got into the film, the more I started to notice other things, such as the underlying anger Sirk seems to present toward the society that is frowning upon the romance of the two leads, Rock Hudson seen as a lowly gardener and Jane Wyman as the older widower with money and standing. As the anger and underlying commentary became more prominent, things got more interesting for me. In my opinion, there is a clear resentment towards the societal crowd that is ostracizing the two lovers, which seems to me like a rare stance for a 50's film. The other thing I should comment on, and one of the most significant things of the picture, is the gorgeous Technicolor cinematography. Along with "The Red Shoes", this may be the most beautiful film shot in Technicolor. I am not sure that this film will appeal to everyone, but I certainly think it is worth watching.