Amigo Reviews

  • Jan 27, 2016

    Interesting look by John Sayles at the American imperialist occupation of the Philippines in the early 20th century

    Interesting look by John Sayles at the American imperialist occupation of the Philippines in the early 20th century

  • Aug 09, 2013

    That last scene was the bomb! Another exceptional performance from Joel Torre.

    That last scene was the bomb! Another exceptional performance from Joel Torre.

  • Aug 07, 2013

    A powerful historical drama that examines the complexities of counter-insurgency and life under occupation.

    A powerful historical drama that examines the complexities of counter-insurgency and life under occupation.

  • Apr 08, 2013

    An excellent film filled with ideas and insights.

    An excellent film filled with ideas and insights.

  • Mar 22, 2013

    Although its fiction, having read some diaries of GIs during the Philippine-American war, particularly Gen. Aguinaldo's own account, the movie was entertaining and believable. Made me a fan of writer-director John Sayles. However, won't be surprised if more Filipinos prefer movies made by those whom they will also elect and re elect in the coming Philippine election.

    Although its fiction, having read some diaries of GIs during the Philippine-American war, particularly Gen. Aguinaldo's own account, the movie was entertaining and believable. Made me a fan of writer-director John Sayles. However, won't be surprised if more Filipinos prefer movies made by those whom they will also elect and re elect in the coming Philippine election.

  • Stephen E Super Reviewer
    Apr 15, 2012

    "Amigo" is a small, interesting little low-budget film that benefits from beautiful photography and Sayles' well-paced direction. For its two hour running time, it breezes by and remains consistently entertaining. A few performances are off and the costume design is bland, but "Amigo" is another fine outing from one of cinema's greatest storytellers.

    "Amigo" is a small, interesting little low-budget film that benefits from beautiful photography and Sayles' well-paced direction. For its two hour running time, it breezes by and remains consistently entertaining. A few performances are off and the costume design is bland, but "Amigo" is another fine outing from one of cinema's greatest storytellers.

  • Apr 03, 2012

    I think it was extremely powerful, and maybe too nuanced for some of these reviewers,

    I think it was extremely powerful, and maybe too nuanced for some of these reviewers,

  • Mar 01, 2012

    i realy love history movies:)

    i realy love history movies:)

  • Feb 02, 2012

    Hands down one of the most boring films of all time.

    Hands down one of the most boring films of all time.

  • Dec 21, 2011

    John Sayles is a one of a kind filmmaker (I mean have you seen Lone Star?) and a brilliant provocateur. His latest, Amigo, is no less a potent piece of work. Amigo is a look at American imperialism through the history of the United States occupation of the Philippines during the Spanish-American War. Sayles' source material is the novel A Moment in The Sun, but the writer-director focuses the action wonderfully on life in the village of San Isidro, a place torn by conflict. Filipino actor Joel Torre is stellar as Rafael, a village big cheese who attempts to play amigo with the American occupiers, led by Lt. Compton (the sexy and excellent Garret Dillahunt from tv's Raising Hope) and his racist commander Col. Hardacre (Chris Cooper, superb as usual). This doesn't sit well with Rafael's brother Simon (Ronnie Lazaro) who leads a band of rebels, and the set up draws stark parallels to modern day conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Working with a 128 minute running time and a script in English, Spanish and Tagalog, Sayles is bound to trip up on his greater ambitions, and he does, but no sense in finding fault in a filmmaker striving for something felt and true. Years after his marvelous 1980 debut The Return of The Secaucus Seven, Sayles is still looking at the world through his own unique lens, and Amigo is a remarkable example of his skill. It stays with you.

    John Sayles is a one of a kind filmmaker (I mean have you seen Lone Star?) and a brilliant provocateur. His latest, Amigo, is no less a potent piece of work. Amigo is a look at American imperialism through the history of the United States occupation of the Philippines during the Spanish-American War. Sayles' source material is the novel A Moment in The Sun, but the writer-director focuses the action wonderfully on life in the village of San Isidro, a place torn by conflict. Filipino actor Joel Torre is stellar as Rafael, a village big cheese who attempts to play amigo with the American occupiers, led by Lt. Compton (the sexy and excellent Garret Dillahunt from tv's Raising Hope) and his racist commander Col. Hardacre (Chris Cooper, superb as usual). This doesn't sit well with Rafael's brother Simon (Ronnie Lazaro) who leads a band of rebels, and the set up draws stark parallels to modern day conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Working with a 128 minute running time and a script in English, Spanish and Tagalog, Sayles is bound to trip up on his greater ambitions, and he does, but no sense in finding fault in a filmmaker striving for something felt and true. Years after his marvelous 1980 debut The Return of The Secaucus Seven, Sayles is still looking at the world through his own unique lens, and Amigo is a remarkable example of his skill. It stays with you.