Reviews

  • Nov 07, 2021

    Fully deserves it's status as one of the greatest films ever made.

    Fully deserves it's status as one of the greatest films ever made.

  • Oct 31, 2021

    This isn't about the Vietnam war, this IS the Vietnam war. This isn't about the insanity and horror of the potential of man's cruelty, this IS the vision into the depths of man's multifaceted darkness. This is pure art in motion picture. [saw it again, but this time on the big screen in ucf auditorium. amazing experience]

    This isn't about the Vietnam war, this IS the Vietnam war. This isn't about the insanity and horror of the potential of man's cruelty, this IS the vision into the depths of man's multifaceted darkness. This is pure art in motion picture. [saw it again, but this time on the big screen in ucf auditorium. amazing experience]

  • Oct 26, 2021

    Apocalypse Now is a 1979 film directed by Francis Ford Coppola, who contributed to the writing process along with screenwriter John Milius. The film is based on the book Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad and was produced by Francis Ford Coppola, John Ashley, and Kim Aubry. The movie stars Martin Sheen as Willard and Marlon Brando as Colonel Kurtz. The movie tells Willard's journey as he travels deep into the Cambodian jungle on a military assignment to assassinate Captain Kurtz, a rogue officer thought to have become a murderer. Production highlights include dedicated direction by Coppola, committed acting from Sheen and Brando, and striking cinematography by Vittorio Storaro. Coppola is the driving force behind the production; his energy inspired all aspects of the film from both sides of the camera. Coppola's single-minded dedication to his craft made the film possible and he supported the film financially when it went over budget and past its expected timeline. Apocalypse Now is notable for its sheer scale, including large-scale war scenes with intricate helicopter choreography, and could not have been as successful without Coppola's competent direction at the helm. Sheen and Brando both worked with Coppola to develop their characters and the collaboration is evident in Willard's enigmatic introspection and Kurtz's wayward mystery. Both actors are deeply committed and their performances force viewers to engage with the film by puzzling out their characters' thoughts and motivations. Stotaro won an Oscar for his cinematography in Apocalypse Now and his work is notable because of the way his unique choices contribute to greater themes in the film. For example, Stotaro uses a canted angle and a long shot when Willard first enters the jungle, making him seem small and unbalanced to demonstrate his powerlessness against the jungle. Additionally, Stotaro uses saturated colors to signify the culture clash between Willard's men and the native people. Stotaro plays with lighting throughout the film, particularly evident in the scenes involving Kurtz. Stotaro mires Kurtz in swatches of dark light to reflect the good and evil that resides within him, Willard, and the viewer at home. Overall, I highly recommend Apocalypse Now because of the way the film examines universally relevant themes such as good versus evil. Willard begins the film in an existential crisis, home alone with nothing to fill the empty void inside of him, but he ends up travelling deep inside himself as he ventures farther and farther into the jungle. As Willard embarks on his journey to find Kurtz, he can't help but identify with him, noticing how the good and evil within Kurtz lives in him too, and connects him to all people. Apocalypse Now is more than just a war film. The film represents the inescapable psychological journey that all humans will experience if they look deep enough. The film is uncomfortable to watch at times because it calls attention to the hearts of darkness within everyone, but essentially optimistic because of the message it sends about the power of choice to act upon these primal urges. At the end of the day, Willard decides to kill Kurtz, and so can the viewer.

    Apocalypse Now is a 1979 film directed by Francis Ford Coppola, who contributed to the writing process along with screenwriter John Milius. The film is based on the book Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad and was produced by Francis Ford Coppola, John Ashley, and Kim Aubry. The movie stars Martin Sheen as Willard and Marlon Brando as Colonel Kurtz. The movie tells Willard's journey as he travels deep into the Cambodian jungle on a military assignment to assassinate Captain Kurtz, a rogue officer thought to have become a murderer. Production highlights include dedicated direction by Coppola, committed acting from Sheen and Brando, and striking cinematography by Vittorio Storaro. Coppola is the driving force behind the production; his energy inspired all aspects of the film from both sides of the camera. Coppola's single-minded dedication to his craft made the film possible and he supported the film financially when it went over budget and past its expected timeline. Apocalypse Now is notable for its sheer scale, including large-scale war scenes with intricate helicopter choreography, and could not have been as successful without Coppola's competent direction at the helm. Sheen and Brando both worked with Coppola to develop their characters and the collaboration is evident in Willard's enigmatic introspection and Kurtz's wayward mystery. Both actors are deeply committed and their performances force viewers to engage with the film by puzzling out their characters' thoughts and motivations. Stotaro won an Oscar for his cinematography in Apocalypse Now and his work is notable because of the way his unique choices contribute to greater themes in the film. For example, Stotaro uses a canted angle and a long shot when Willard first enters the jungle, making him seem small and unbalanced to demonstrate his powerlessness against the jungle. Additionally, Stotaro uses saturated colors to signify the culture clash between Willard's men and the native people. Stotaro plays with lighting throughout the film, particularly evident in the scenes involving Kurtz. Stotaro mires Kurtz in swatches of dark light to reflect the good and evil that resides within him, Willard, and the viewer at home. Overall, I highly recommend Apocalypse Now because of the way the film examines universally relevant themes such as good versus evil. Willard begins the film in an existential crisis, home alone with nothing to fill the empty void inside of him, but he ends up travelling deep inside himself as he ventures farther and farther into the jungle. As Willard embarks on his journey to find Kurtz, he can't help but identify with him, noticing how the good and evil within Kurtz lives in him too, and connects him to all people. Apocalypse Now is more than just a war film. The film represents the inescapable psychological journey that all humans will experience if they look deep enough. The film is uncomfortable to watch at times because it calls attention to the hearts of darkness within everyone, but essentially optimistic because of the message it sends about the power of choice to act upon these primal urges. At the end of the day, Willard decides to kill Kurtz, and so can the viewer.

  • Oct 26, 2021

    Martin Sheen's performance and the diverse ways of interpreting the ending blew my mind making me remember this masterpiece forever. Winner of two Oscars, Apocalypse Now is known as one of the best films of the XX century and one of the best war films of all time because of the accurate representation of the horrors and situations in the war. Captain Benjamin L.Willard (Martin Sheen) is sent to Vietnam's war to search and kill Coronel Kurtz (Marlon Brando) because he lost his mind and he is in the middle of the jungle directing an army of indigenous people who consider Kurtz a god. Through the trip, Willard will face the consequences and the horrors of the war, how people cope with them and all the injustices. Apocalypse Now was directed, produced, and co-screenwritten; with John Milius, by Francis Ford Coppola based on the book Heart of Darkness written by Joseph Conrad was a blockbuster despite all the obstacles it must face during the filming. Not only the filming was late but also over budget, because of that Coppola had to finance part of the movie by himself. Also, they decided to film it in a jungle in the Philippines which did not help but make the movie more realistic. However, the camerawork, lighting, and photography coordinated by Vittorio Storaro boosted the messages that the film was trying to transmit and transformed Apocalypse Now into a beautiful piece. The use of warm colors at the beginning symbolizing life, birth, and the cold colors at the end symbolizing death was the key in this movie, along with the lack of shadows and darkness during the first part, and the increasing of them as we get closer to the end, especially in Kurtz's scenes making everything more dramatic. Finally, the music used in the film creates a significant impact on the spectator because of the variety, the lyrics of the song, and the innovations. In the movie, there are songs from The Doors, Rolling Stones, and Flash Cadillac, and the incidental music composed by Carmine Coppola. For example, at the beginning we can hear a song by The Doors mixed with the sound of the helicopters during the war, introducing the public to the horrors of the war. In conclusion, Apocalypse Now will keep being considered a masterpiece and the amazing job done by Coppola was definitely worth seeing. By watching this film, I learned about war, giving it a different point of view because of its realism, and that things can be different from what we are told. I would totally recommend it to everybody.

    Martin Sheen's performance and the diverse ways of interpreting the ending blew my mind making me remember this masterpiece forever. Winner of two Oscars, Apocalypse Now is known as one of the best films of the XX century and one of the best war films of all time because of the accurate representation of the horrors and situations in the war. Captain Benjamin L.Willard (Martin Sheen) is sent to Vietnam's war to search and kill Coronel Kurtz (Marlon Brando) because he lost his mind and he is in the middle of the jungle directing an army of indigenous people who consider Kurtz a god. Through the trip, Willard will face the consequences and the horrors of the war, how people cope with them and all the injustices. Apocalypse Now was directed, produced, and co-screenwritten; with John Milius, by Francis Ford Coppola based on the book Heart of Darkness written by Joseph Conrad was a blockbuster despite all the obstacles it must face during the filming. Not only the filming was late but also over budget, because of that Coppola had to finance part of the movie by himself. Also, they decided to film it in a jungle in the Philippines which did not help but make the movie more realistic. However, the camerawork, lighting, and photography coordinated by Vittorio Storaro boosted the messages that the film was trying to transmit and transformed Apocalypse Now into a beautiful piece. The use of warm colors at the beginning symbolizing life, birth, and the cold colors at the end symbolizing death was the key in this movie, along with the lack of shadows and darkness during the first part, and the increasing of them as we get closer to the end, especially in Kurtz's scenes making everything more dramatic. Finally, the music used in the film creates a significant impact on the spectator because of the variety, the lyrics of the song, and the innovations. In the movie, there are songs from The Doors, Rolling Stones, and Flash Cadillac, and the incidental music composed by Carmine Coppola. For example, at the beginning we can hear a song by The Doors mixed with the sound of the helicopters during the war, introducing the public to the horrors of the war. In conclusion, Apocalypse Now will keep being considered a masterpiece and the amazing job done by Coppola was definitely worth seeing. By watching this film, I learned about war, giving it a different point of view because of its realism, and that things can be different from what we are told. I would totally recommend it to everybody.

  • Oct 26, 2021

    The Success of a Near Apocalyptic Failure The film Apocalypse Now directed by Francis Coppola is a masterpiece that was nearly a financial disaster. The film had an originally small budget of a couple million dollars that quickly grew to a budget of over 30 million dollars. The film follows the life of a soldier in the Vietnam war on a made-up mission while still highlighting very realistic aspects of the Vietnam war. The mix of a strong story while touching of the extreme tragedies of the Vietnam war aids in drawing the viewer in and once you are drawn in you can not look away. The beginning of the film is slightly confusing, and the story of the main character is not originally clear, but over time Colonel Walter E Kurtz's back story becomes clear. He is played by the amazing Marlon Brando who does a fantastic job of portraying the mental tole being in a war has on a person. The film puts on display incredible special effects as the film is full of explosions however this stimulation does not take away from the content of the story. Often special effects are used as a crutch to draw away from weak story, but in this case the plethora of special effects augments the story being told. Creating a film about such a heavy topic while still making the film enjoyable is often hard, but Coppola did an amazing job of striking a balance between the two. By placing a fictional story in a real environment, it allowed the viewer to buy into the story with out being overly disturbed while still seeing flashes of the terrible situations that took place during the Vietnam war. This mix of real and fake makes the story so much more compelling and really leads to the viewer being invested in the characters of the film. Overall, the film is a masterpiece of cometary on war subtly entwined in an eye-catching story of a mission in the Vietnam war. The film is slightly intense at points that may drive away some viewers, but in my opinion this film is an absolute must watch.

    The Success of a Near Apocalyptic Failure The film Apocalypse Now directed by Francis Coppola is a masterpiece that was nearly a financial disaster. The film had an originally small budget of a couple million dollars that quickly grew to a budget of over 30 million dollars. The film follows the life of a soldier in the Vietnam war on a made-up mission while still highlighting very realistic aspects of the Vietnam war. The mix of a strong story while touching of the extreme tragedies of the Vietnam war aids in drawing the viewer in and once you are drawn in you can not look away. The beginning of the film is slightly confusing, and the story of the main character is not originally clear, but over time Colonel Walter E Kurtz's back story becomes clear. He is played by the amazing Marlon Brando who does a fantastic job of portraying the mental tole being in a war has on a person. The film puts on display incredible special effects as the film is full of explosions however this stimulation does not take away from the content of the story. Often special effects are used as a crutch to draw away from weak story, but in this case the plethora of special effects augments the story being told. Creating a film about such a heavy topic while still making the film enjoyable is often hard, but Coppola did an amazing job of striking a balance between the two. By placing a fictional story in a real environment, it allowed the viewer to buy into the story with out being overly disturbed while still seeing flashes of the terrible situations that took place during the Vietnam war. This mix of real and fake makes the story so much more compelling and really leads to the viewer being invested in the characters of the film. Overall, the film is a masterpiece of cometary on war subtly entwined in an eye-catching story of a mission in the Vietnam war. The film is slightly intense at points that may drive away some viewers, but in my opinion this film is an absolute must watch.

  • Oct 22, 2021

    The movie has some great moments but the plot is disjointed and confused.

    The movie has some great moments but the plot is disjointed and confused.

  • Oct 05, 2021

    Quite frankly the second best fillm ever. Everything here works just perfectly. Although 3 hours can seem like too long to focus, this is one of the few films that will keep you reeled in the whole way through. It's a dark, but brilliant story, perfectly adapted from the novel. But, did you ever see hearts of darkness? Wayyyyy better than apoalypse now

    Quite frankly the second best fillm ever. Everything here works just perfectly. Although 3 hours can seem like too long to focus, this is one of the few films that will keep you reeled in the whole way through. It's a dark, but brilliant story, perfectly adapted from the novel. But, did you ever see hearts of darkness? Wayyyyy better than apoalypse now

  • Sep 18, 2021

    I watched the full 3 hour redux version, which is a bit too long. Not sure if the full cut that Coppola preferred, or the original 2 hour and 30 minute version would be better. The ending seemed a bit anticlimactic and a bit difficult to fully understand. The beginning and middle parts of the movie are great. I was going to give it a solid three, but the ending killed my earlier impressions, which were already dying due to the length. It could possibly go for four or even be a five maybe with certain scenes cut out, so I'll have to go back and watch the other versions.

    I watched the full 3 hour redux version, which is a bit too long. Not sure if the full cut that Coppola preferred, or the original 2 hour and 30 minute version would be better. The ending seemed a bit anticlimactic and a bit difficult to fully understand. The beginning and middle parts of the movie are great. I was going to give it a solid three, but the ending killed my earlier impressions, which were already dying due to the length. It could possibly go for four or even be a five maybe with certain scenes cut out, so I'll have to go back and watch the other versions.

  • Sep 17, 2021

    As good as war movies GET! Has every level of interest imaginable! Love this film to the max and still holds its own to this VERY day! Brando and Sheen just amazing! Super directed too and with a super solid performance by Duvall!

    As good as war movies GET! Has every level of interest imaginable! Love this film to the max and still holds its own to this VERY day! Brando and Sheen just amazing! Super directed too and with a super solid performance by Duvall!

  • Aug 28, 2021

    Another great Military Movie, just short of *5* stars!!!!

    Another great Military Movie, just short of *5* stars!!!!