Reviews

  • Apr 07, 2021

    Out of anything I just found this movie boring the soundtrack was awful dear God the narrator was annoying the camera work was really weird the monster was just plain stupid all around just skip this one.

    Out of anything I just found this movie boring the soundtrack was awful dear God the narrator was annoying the camera work was really weird the monster was just plain stupid all around just skip this one.

  • Jan 21, 2021

    When I was a kid I loved it when this movie came on TV, not because I thought it was scary, but because my prepubescent brain registered the She Monster, aka Shirley Kilpatrick, as naked. Watching it again 50 years later I can report that the film is still not scary, but the She Monster is definitely pretty hot, if not particularly astounding.

    When I was a kid I loved it when this movie came on TV, not because I thought it was scary, but because my prepubescent brain registered the She Monster, aka Shirley Kilpatrick, as naked. Watching it again 50 years later I can report that the film is still not scary, but the She Monster is definitely pretty hot, if not particularly astounding.

  • Jun 11, 2015

    This AIP picture is completely forgotten. It's an average film, bad acting and special effects. A lac of violence but the film still has it's moments. Starring Robert Clarke, he is has a major impact on the film and the atmosphere as well. Recommended

    This AIP picture is completely forgotten. It's an average film, bad acting and special effects. A lac of violence but the film still has it's moments. Starring Robert Clarke, he is has a major impact on the film and the atmosphere as well. Recommended

  • Jul 27, 2014

    Astounding it is not....

    Astounding it is not....

  • Mar 27, 2011

    You'd have to be pretty heartless not to love this flick for all the wrong reasons. It's such a perfect mix of everything that ever went wrong with low budget 1950s drive-in schlock, so earnest in its badness that without knowing anything else about it you can see Ed Wood's fingerprints all over it from the outset. Even though Wood wasn't the director here, he did "consult" on this project, and from the moment the long-winded, self-important and incoherent opening narration begins, you'll know that despite Ronnie Ashcroft directing, you're taking a voyage into the hilarious depths of Edwoodia. Two thugs and an alcoholic former socialite kidnap a current socialite. Fleeing the police, they arrive at the secluded home of a geologist in the San Gabriel mountains. A meteor has crashed nearby, and with it has come the Astounding She-Monster. The most astounding things about this She-Monster are that she can't run and cameras apparently can't focus on her. She's deadly radioactive, too. Anything she touches dies instantly. She spends the entire film walking slowly in pursuit of the five human characters who, for their part, can't seem to hit upon the idea that they could simply run away from the Astoundingly Slow She-Monster. The entire film consists of them running out of the geologist's house, the she-monster walking down the road to pursue them, and the human characters running back into the house. Then the she monster comes into the house and the humans run out. Repeat until the hilariously unconvincing ending. But wait, there's more! Thanks to Ed Wood's consultation, we get plenty of inept social commentary on the world as it was in 1957! The narrator tells us aaalllllllll about the "problems" of being a socialite at the beginning, and even better, we get Wood's philosophy about work and Communism delivered by one of the thugs in the middle of the flick. And, of course, we get a dose of Wood's uneasy relationship with women, who, we're reminded constantly, are both beautiful and deadly. For some reason, insist Wood and Ashcroft, every man on the planet wants to get with the Astounding She-Monster... even if she is lethally radioactive. This is such a beautifully bad bit of 1950s Cold War Americana that, aside from being a must-see for those who love "so-bad-it's-good" sci-fi cinema, it ought to be shown in junior high school American History classes so that students can get a feel for the paranoia and unintentional weirdness of the time. If you've chuckled over Ed Wood's alleged films, don't miss this one!

    You'd have to be pretty heartless not to love this flick for all the wrong reasons. It's such a perfect mix of everything that ever went wrong with low budget 1950s drive-in schlock, so earnest in its badness that without knowing anything else about it you can see Ed Wood's fingerprints all over it from the outset. Even though Wood wasn't the director here, he did "consult" on this project, and from the moment the long-winded, self-important and incoherent opening narration begins, you'll know that despite Ronnie Ashcroft directing, you're taking a voyage into the hilarious depths of Edwoodia. Two thugs and an alcoholic former socialite kidnap a current socialite. Fleeing the police, they arrive at the secluded home of a geologist in the San Gabriel mountains. A meteor has crashed nearby, and with it has come the Astounding She-Monster. The most astounding things about this She-Monster are that she can't run and cameras apparently can't focus on her. She's deadly radioactive, too. Anything she touches dies instantly. She spends the entire film walking slowly in pursuit of the five human characters who, for their part, can't seem to hit upon the idea that they could simply run away from the Astoundingly Slow She-Monster. The entire film consists of them running out of the geologist's house, the she-monster walking down the road to pursue them, and the human characters running back into the house. Then the she monster comes into the house and the humans run out. Repeat until the hilariously unconvincing ending. But wait, there's more! Thanks to Ed Wood's consultation, we get plenty of inept social commentary on the world as it was in 1957! The narrator tells us aaalllllllll about the "problems" of being a socialite at the beginning, and even better, we get Wood's philosophy about work and Communism delivered by one of the thugs in the middle of the flick. And, of course, we get a dose of Wood's uneasy relationship with women, who, we're reminded constantly, are both beautiful and deadly. For some reason, insist Wood and Ashcroft, every man on the planet wants to get with the Astounding She-Monster... even if she is lethally radioactive. This is such a beautifully bad bit of 1950s Cold War Americana that, aside from being a must-see for those who love "so-bad-it's-good" sci-fi cinema, it ought to be shown in junior high school American History classes so that students can get a feel for the paranoia and unintentional weirdness of the time. If you've chuckled over Ed Wood's alleged films, don't miss this one!

  • Feb 02, 2010

    A woman with above normal atomic radiation interrupts a hostage taking and causes havoc. Wow, that's all I can say about this one. Filled with Ed-Woodish narraration at the beginning, hilarious acting, a truly overblown soundtrack, and yes, the... Astounding She-Monster, this tries to say a lot of things, but falls flat on it's face of course saying it. Amusing sense of pacing too.

    A woman with above normal atomic radiation interrupts a hostage taking and causes havoc. Wow, that's all I can say about this one. Filled with Ed-Woodish narraration at the beginning, hilarious acting, a truly overblown soundtrack, and yes, the... Astounding She-Monster, this tries to say a lot of things, but falls flat on it's face of course saying it. Amusing sense of pacing too.