Beanpole (Dylda) Reviews

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March 13, 2020
The movie's fluid camerawork, set detail, and deeply saturated greens and shocking reds help mitigate the gloom. And the acting is top-notch, especially considering that most of the players are non-professionals.
March 9, 2020
A remarkably mature and accomplished film from 28-year-old director/co-writer Kantemir Balagov.
March 6, 2020
It's a daunting, harrowing film that challenges an audience to trust its creators to send us on a journey worth experiencing
March 6, 2020
A captivating story about a nation struggling to find its identity in the aftermath of war, and the women who helped rebuild it. [Full Review in Spanish]
March 5, 2020
Bagalov's directorial vision and voice are bold and compelling. Beanpole is infused with a profoundly tender intimacy, interspersed with stark portrayals of pain, cruelty, and sacrifice. And yet these hard-to-watch moments never feel lurid or gratuitous.
March 3, 2020
The story is compounded by Balagov's imposing visual aesthetic, which was evident in Closeness but here is on a whole new level.
February 29, 2020
The issues addressed are troubling and often inhuman, but stick with it, not just for the story, but for the oddly moving respects Balagov pays to real-life female warriors. For them, "Beanpole" stands as a towering tribute.
February 28, 2020
Beanpole may not exactly be a light and refreshing night out at the movies but it is a thoughtful and provocative work that deserves to be seen by those with a stomach for strong and serious-minded material.
February 28, 2020
Beanpole delivers a shattering blow that reminds us that the price of war doesn't stop just because peace has been declared. Gifted and clear-eyed, Balagov proves that an anti-war movie needn't be set on the battlefield.
February 28, 2020
"Beanpole" is a daunting Russian film of significant power and historical import.
February 27, 2020
It's a story about carrying on after the unimaginable, when things are supposed to go back to normal as if they ever really could.
February 27, 2020
They can't look away. Neither may you.
February 23, 2020
Finely observed period war drama about two women soldier survivors dealing with trauma.
February 22, 2020
This mixture of horror and normalcy makes this an interesting study of war and humanity.
February 21, 2020
Masha and Iya are slowly settling into a peacetime mood, where there's time for a little tenderness. Their emergence is something to see.
February 21, 2020
If you can grit through it, the film offers a rewarding - if also unnerving - look at survival in the face of tragedy.
February 20, 2020
Pent-up emotions emerge through carefully articulated gestures that play like a funereal ballet.
February 20, 2020
While Beanpole is an especially upsetting sight to behold, I can't wait to see more from Balagov in the future.
February 20, 2020
Few dramas, let alone one from a filmmaker this young, are this specific or accomplished.
February 19, 2020
Even if the film seems slow at times, there's always something to look at, including Miroshnichenko and Perelygina, who are able to find grace and dignity in two such odd, hollowed out characters.
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