The Black Dahlia Reviews

  • Aug 19, 2019

    You will get a headache just trying to understand what is going on

    You will get a headache just trying to understand what is going on

  • Jul 04, 2019

    It Sucked Wasn't what I was expecting! It was very distant from the actual crime! I'm disappointed.

    It Sucked Wasn't what I was expecting! It was very distant from the actual crime! I'm disappointed.

  • Feb 25, 2019

    A movie that had no direction and very little substance, I was bored and had no idea what was even happening. What angered me about it was how stylish this movie thought it was.

    A movie that had no direction and very little substance, I was bored and had no idea what was even happening. What angered me about it was how stylish this movie thought it was.

  • Dec 16, 2018

    Der Mordfall der schwarzen Dahlie, in einem Stil des Film Noir! Regisseur Brian De Palma nimmt uns mit, ins Jahr 1947, der Stadt der Engel. Zwei abgehalfterte Boxer und beste Freunde des Police Departements, jagen Mafiabosse, Kleinkriminelle und korrupte Polizisten. Als sie zum dem Fall der schwarzen Dahlie stossen, gehen die zwei Freunde an ihre Grenzen. Eigentlich ist der Thriller stimmig, wenn De Palma, die Geschichte, etwas tiefgründiger erzählt hätte. Die Story kommt nicht voran und auch die Figuren bleiben schwach und langweilig. Die Figur des Helden Bucky Bleichert wird von Josh Hartnett dargestellt. Man findet aber, dass Hartnett etwas überfodert mit seiner Rolle ist. Hartnett spielt seine Rolle, wirkt aber angespannt. Auch die selbstsichere Scarlett Johansson wirkt hier eher blass und hilfesuchend, in ihrer Rolle. Die zwei besten Rollen haben Aaron Eckhart, der seine Rolle als Lee Blanchard genüsslich an die Grenzen spielt und Hilary Swank, die eine mysteriöse Femme Fatale personifiziert. Auch die Kamera sind gut positioniert und gehen mit dem Geschehen mit. Kein Wunder wurde Kameramann Vilmos Zsigmond hier für den Oscar nominiert. Denn der Blickwinkel ist hier nicht nur auf das Allgemeine gerichtet, sondern fokussiert hier auch die Gesichter der einzelnen Personen, von denen man nicht weiss, auf welcher Seite des Gesetzes sie stehen. Das Drehbuch schrieb hier James Ellroy. Er mischte eigentlich der reale Fall der schwarzen Dahlie mit etwas Fiction der Filmindustrie. Im Film wurde der Mörder auch gestellt. In Wahrheit aber, wurde der Fall Black Dahlia niemals aufgeklärt. Auch wenn es so ist, dass die Geschichte aufgeklärt wurde, bleibt das Ganze weitgehend zurück und der Verlauf des Films, läuft mit angezogener Handbremse. Fazit: Man ist besseres von De Palma gewohnt. Ein guter Thriller nur leider nicht ganz spannend umgesetzt!

    Der Mordfall der schwarzen Dahlie, in einem Stil des Film Noir! Regisseur Brian De Palma nimmt uns mit, ins Jahr 1947, der Stadt der Engel. Zwei abgehalfterte Boxer und beste Freunde des Police Departements, jagen Mafiabosse, Kleinkriminelle und korrupte Polizisten. Als sie zum dem Fall der schwarzen Dahlie stossen, gehen die zwei Freunde an ihre Grenzen. Eigentlich ist der Thriller stimmig, wenn De Palma, die Geschichte, etwas tiefgründiger erzählt hätte. Die Story kommt nicht voran und auch die Figuren bleiben schwach und langweilig. Die Figur des Helden Bucky Bleichert wird von Josh Hartnett dargestellt. Man findet aber, dass Hartnett etwas überfodert mit seiner Rolle ist. Hartnett spielt seine Rolle, wirkt aber angespannt. Auch die selbstsichere Scarlett Johansson wirkt hier eher blass und hilfesuchend, in ihrer Rolle. Die zwei besten Rollen haben Aaron Eckhart, der seine Rolle als Lee Blanchard genüsslich an die Grenzen spielt und Hilary Swank, die eine mysteriöse Femme Fatale personifiziert. Auch die Kamera sind gut positioniert und gehen mit dem Geschehen mit. Kein Wunder wurde Kameramann Vilmos Zsigmond hier für den Oscar nominiert. Denn der Blickwinkel ist hier nicht nur auf das Allgemeine gerichtet, sondern fokussiert hier auch die Gesichter der einzelnen Personen, von denen man nicht weiss, auf welcher Seite des Gesetzes sie stehen. Das Drehbuch schrieb hier James Ellroy. Er mischte eigentlich der reale Fall der schwarzen Dahlie mit etwas Fiction der Filmindustrie. Im Film wurde der Mörder auch gestellt. In Wahrheit aber, wurde der Fall Black Dahlia niemals aufgeklärt. Auch wenn es so ist, dass die Geschichte aufgeklärt wurde, bleibt das Ganze weitgehend zurück und der Verlauf des Films, läuft mit angezogener Handbremse. Fazit: Man ist besseres von De Palma gewohnt. Ein guter Thriller nur leider nicht ganz spannend umgesetzt!

  • Oct 16, 2018

    Who's the biggest fool; DePalma for making the movie or me for wasting two hours of my life?

    Who's the biggest fool; DePalma for making the movie or me for wasting two hours of my life?

  • Jun 29, 2018

    I'd basically given up on Brian De Palma long ago, so I'm not sure why I checked this out from the library. Perhaps it was the promise of "neo-noir", drawn from the same vein as L.A. Confidential (also based on James Ellroy's work), a far superior film? Or maybe I just needed something trashy after life got too serious? De Palma was always trashy, even when his films had some merit (long ago), but, unfortunately, he got boring. This film is boring despite its star power. Josh Hartnett is a rather vacuous hero, not charismatic enough to carry the picture, and seemingly lost in the plot twists rather than actively engaging with them. (Sure, that's a traditional noir hero conundrum but we needed more of an active problem-solver like Bogey, Dick Powell, or Glenn Ford here rather than a passive "baby, I don't care" Mitchum-type who gets suckered). Scarlett Johansson tries her hand at the forties femme fatale but I've concluded that she can't really act. Hilary Swank can act and seems cast against type as another femme fatale but her part of the plot feels rather ludicrous. Aaron Eckhart, as the somewhat shady cop/partner to Hartnett, plays cartoonish, perhaps trying to will the film to be bolder than it is. I suspect the underlying book, based on a true crime story (the real murder of a wannabe actress in the days of Hollywood's golden age), is a lot more interesting and the many characters and intricate/convoluted plot are done justice in a way that De Palma just can't manage to put on the screen. Even the Oscar-nominated cinematography by Vilmos Zsigmond can't rescue things.

    I'd basically given up on Brian De Palma long ago, so I'm not sure why I checked this out from the library. Perhaps it was the promise of "neo-noir", drawn from the same vein as L.A. Confidential (also based on James Ellroy's work), a far superior film? Or maybe I just needed something trashy after life got too serious? De Palma was always trashy, even when his films had some merit (long ago), but, unfortunately, he got boring. This film is boring despite its star power. Josh Hartnett is a rather vacuous hero, not charismatic enough to carry the picture, and seemingly lost in the plot twists rather than actively engaging with them. (Sure, that's a traditional noir hero conundrum but we needed more of an active problem-solver like Bogey, Dick Powell, or Glenn Ford here rather than a passive "baby, I don't care" Mitchum-type who gets suckered). Scarlett Johansson tries her hand at the forties femme fatale but I've concluded that she can't really act. Hilary Swank can act and seems cast against type as another femme fatale but her part of the plot feels rather ludicrous. Aaron Eckhart, as the somewhat shady cop/partner to Hartnett, plays cartoonish, perhaps trying to will the film to be bolder than it is. I suspect the underlying book, based on a true crime story (the real murder of a wannabe actress in the days of Hollywood's golden age), is a lot more interesting and the many characters and intricate/convoluted plot are done justice in a way that De Palma just can't manage to put on the screen. Even the Oscar-nominated cinematography by Vilmos Zsigmond can't rescue things.

  • Feb 14, 2018

    I loved the book but found the ending ridiculous. The film is consistently ridiculous but starts out compellingly so. De Palma can make enthralling camp so I tried to delay judgement. What ended up on screen is a mess. It never captures the spirit of Ellroy but is impeccably realized visually. The actors are not served well, neither is the source material. It's close to being so bad it's good but it doesn't quite succeed on that front either. It's an interesting curio for DePalma/Ellroy fans.

    I loved the book but found the ending ridiculous. The film is consistently ridiculous but starts out compellingly so. De Palma can make enthralling camp so I tried to delay judgement. What ended up on screen is a mess. It never captures the spirit of Ellroy but is impeccably realized visually. The actors are not served well, neither is the source material. It's close to being so bad it's good but it doesn't quite succeed on that front either. It's an interesting curio for DePalma/Ellroy fans.

  • Stephen S Super Reviewer
    Mar 11, 2017

    Confusing story, but pretty interesting I think. I like the noire style of the film.

    Confusing story, but pretty interesting I think. I like the noire style of the film.

  • Jan 12, 2017

    I wanted to like this. I love murder mysteries, I love noir, I love movies based off real events. But this was awful story telling, ridiculous plot, horrible editing. Such a disappointment for such a fascinating LA murder.

    I wanted to like this. I love murder mysteries, I love noir, I love movies based off real events. But this was awful story telling, ridiculous plot, horrible editing. Such a disappointment for such a fascinating LA murder.

  • Avatar
    Alec B Super Reviewer
    Jul 30, 2016

    The cinematography is undeniably beautiful, but there are about three different incoherent movies stuffed into this mess.

    The cinematography is undeniably beautiful, but there are about three different incoherent movies stuffed into this mess.