Certified Copy (Copie Conforme) Reviews

  • Nov 06, 2018

    This film was amazing!

    This film was amazing!

  • Jul 30, 2018

    Elle (Juliet Binoche), an art expert, seems to be a single mother living in Italy attends a book review of James MIller (William Shinell) who has been recognized for his work surrounding art copies. We soon find out that Elle and James have been or are currently married and have a 15 year history together. What ensues is a day long gallop through the beautiful back streets and cafe houses of a Tuscany village. On the outset this seems to be a generic love story about two people working through there marriage. Generic it is not, as the discussion continue and more and more of the marriage history comes out we find a woman who loves a man but is difficult to love herself. Miller is somewhat of an emotionless clod while Elle is desperate for the companionship she believes should come with being married. Miller refuses to come to terms throughout the movie and we are left with the image of a man not interested in a movie. But is that what happened? Binoche is usually brilliant and this time is no different. The biggest drawback to this movie is that sometimes the dialogue makes no sense. The movie switches between English, French and Italian at an almost frenetic pace so perhaps there where instances where the ideas and thoughts are lost in translation. The director liberally uses mirror shots, as you are viewing the speaker there is a mirror near where one can see what the speaker sees, this makes for some interesting views. Not your typical romance story and if you don't like sometimes witty, sometimes not dialogue this movie is not for you. But if the idea of strolling around in Tuscany is your version of heaven, with or without the subtitles, this movie is worth a watch.

    Elle (Juliet Binoche), an art expert, seems to be a single mother living in Italy attends a book review of James MIller (William Shinell) who has been recognized for his work surrounding art copies. We soon find out that Elle and James have been or are currently married and have a 15 year history together. What ensues is a day long gallop through the beautiful back streets and cafe houses of a Tuscany village. On the outset this seems to be a generic love story about two people working through there marriage. Generic it is not, as the discussion continue and more and more of the marriage history comes out we find a woman who loves a man but is difficult to love herself. Miller is somewhat of an emotionless clod while Elle is desperate for the companionship she believes should come with being married. Miller refuses to come to terms throughout the movie and we are left with the image of a man not interested in a movie. But is that what happened? Binoche is usually brilliant and this time is no different. The biggest drawback to this movie is that sometimes the dialogue makes no sense. The movie switches between English, French and Italian at an almost frenetic pace so perhaps there where instances where the ideas and thoughts are lost in translation. The director liberally uses mirror shots, as you are viewing the speaker there is a mirror near where one can see what the speaker sees, this makes for some interesting views. Not your typical romance story and if you don't like sometimes witty, sometimes not dialogue this movie is not for you. But if the idea of strolling around in Tuscany is your version of heaven, with or without the subtitles, this movie is worth a watch.

  • May 09, 2018

    Certified Copy is a film all about perception and reality, threatening to undo itself with its slow pace and stubborn ambiguity but masterfully elevated by Binoche and Kiarostami

    Certified Copy is a film all about perception and reality, threatening to undo itself with its slow pace and stubborn ambiguity but masterfully elevated by Binoche and Kiarostami

  • Jul 23, 2017

    Kiarostami reflects on love in a horrifyingly genuine fashion, that basically says deep social bonding is an illusion created by insecurity, minutes all the cheap, romantic cliches.

    Kiarostami reflects on love in a horrifyingly genuine fashion, that basically says deep social bonding is an illusion created by insecurity, minutes all the cheap, romantic cliches.

  • Jul 12, 2017

    4/5 Certified Copy provided me with food for thought like no other film or director has, but I cant help but feel that the two brilliant characters that provide the dissertations are not much else but a wonderfully crafted platform that isn't fully sewn together with the underlying themes, in many moments making it almost two movies in one.

    4/5 Certified Copy provided me with food for thought like no other film or director has, but I cant help but feel that the two brilliant characters that provide the dissertations are not much else but a wonderfully crafted platform that isn't fully sewn together with the underlying themes, in many moments making it almost two movies in one.

  • May 30, 2017

    Whatever was good about this movie was over my head....avoid this movie.

    Whatever was good about this movie was over my head....avoid this movie.

  • Apr 26, 2017

    Like Before Sunrise but deeper, more mature, more philosophical. And you never know which is the true explanation of the plot- just like he was saying there is no difference between an original piece of art and a good replica, you can never tell which one is the truer form.

    Like Before Sunrise but deeper, more mature, more philosophical. And you never know which is the true explanation of the plot- just like he was saying there is no difference between an original piece of art and a good replica, you can never tell which one is the truer form.

  • Jan 30, 2017

    A middle-aged version of Before Sunset? I just can't get that.

    A middle-aged version of Before Sunset? I just can't get that.

  • Jan 13, 2017

    I really like french/italian dramas, but somehow this cold-marriage never gets warm. A great flick in the first half, fooling us, subtlety revealing its true self, yet Binoche is sweet, it still lacking something.

    I really like french/italian dramas, but somehow this cold-marriage never gets warm. A great flick in the first half, fooling us, subtlety revealing its true self, yet Binoche is sweet, it still lacking something.

  • Jan 04, 2017

    Relying on the intelligence of the script and the talent of the leads, Abbas Kiarostami's Certified Copy is a profoundly constructed look at relationships with a very human core that is missing in many movies attempting to accomplish the same thing.

    Relying on the intelligence of the script and the talent of the leads, Abbas Kiarostami's Certified Copy is a profoundly constructed look at relationships with a very human core that is missing in many movies attempting to accomplish the same thing.