The Conversation 1974

The Conversation

Critics Consensus

This tense, paranoid thriller presents Francis Ford Coppola at his finest -- and makes some remarkably advanced arguments about technology's role in society that still resonate today.

96%

TOMATOMETER

Total Count: 55

90%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 35,148

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Movie Info

Surveillance expert Harry Caul (Gene Hackman) is hired by a mysterious client's brusque aide (Harrison Ford) to tail a young couple, Mark (Frederic Forrest) and Ann (Cindy Williams). Tracking the pair through San Francisco's Union Square, Caul and his associate Stan (John Cazale) manage to record a cryptic conversation between them. Tormented by memories of a previous case that ended badly, Caul becomes obsessed with the resulting tape, trying to determine if the couple are in danger.

Cast & Crew

Gene Hackman
Harry Caul
Allen Garfield
William P. "Bernie" Moran
Michael Higgins
Paul
Teri Garr
Amy Fredericks
Harrison Ford
Martin Stett
Mark Wheeler
Receptionist
Bill Butler
Cinematographer
Richard Chew
Film Editor
Dean Tavoularis
Production Design
David Shire
Original Music
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News & Interviews for The Conversation

Critic Reviews for The Conversation

All Critics (55) | Top Critics (8) | Fresh (53) | Rotten (2)

  • Thanks to Walter Murch's keen, intuitive sound montage and Hackman's clammy, subtle performance, the movie captures [an] elusive and universal fear-that of losing the power to respond, emotionally and morally, to the evidence of one's own senses.

    August 15, 2016 | Full Review…
  • A major artistic asset to the film -- besides script, direction and the top performances -- is supervising editor Walter Murch's sound collage and re-recording.

    October 18, 2008 | Full Review…

    Variety Staff

    Variety
    Top Critic
  • Coppola manages to turn an expert thriller into a portrayal of the conflict between ritual and responsibility without ever letting the levels of tension subside or the complicated plot get muddled.

    August 12, 2007 | Full Review…
  • A bleak and devastatingly brilliant film.

    February 9, 2006 | Full Review…
    Time Out
    Top Critic
  • Haunting and bothersome.

    May 21, 2003 | Rating: 3/5
  • The Conversation is an intricate and unsettlingly subtle character study, with a very strong performance from Hackman.

    March 4, 2002 | Rating: 5/5 | Full Review…

    Nick Hilditch

    BBC.com
    Top Critic

Audience Reviews for The Conversation

  • Mar 05, 2016
    The Conversation is definitely one of Francis Ford Coppola's best work as well as being very psychological and scary.
    Mr N Super Reviewer
  • Oct 05, 2015
    Between The Godfather and The Godfather Part II Francis Ford Coppola made a film developed from an idea he had almost a decade earlier. Ironically, the main idea behind the film (tape recording) would be the focal point of one of the worst scandals in American history that was going down as this film was being produced and released. The Conversation is about surveillance expert Harry Caul (Gene Hackman), who is a legend in his field, but has skeletons in his closet. Supported by his assistant Stan (the always great John Cazale) Harry has been hired to record and report on a couple (Cindy Williams and Fredrick Forrest) by a man only known as The Director (Robert Duvall). As the job progresses Harry begins to worry about what the consequences of the information he's about to deliver will have on the parties lives based on an incident from his past that still haunts him. Hackman plays Caul as a very low key individual that doesn't want any attention, yet is the center of attention in his little world of watching and listening. He's an anxious little man that knows his business and understands who to operate his personal life to keep it out of his work life. Hackman had hit it big by this point and The Conversation really is a change of pace compared to some of hos other work, mainly looking at The French Connection. The other surprising standout in the film is Harrison Ford as Martin Stett, the threatening thug like individual that is the barrier between the world and The Director. Ford's performance is very confrontational, but he doesn't really do anything to give you a reason to fear him. It's all in your head. The main theme of The Conversation is paranoia. The thing is that the paranoia belongs to Harry Caul. He's the one that's watching people, but he's the most fearful in the film. From the early moments of the movie you see how Harry dictates his entire life to maintain his privacy and you get to the point that you wonder if maybe some of this fear is in his head, held up by Harry having some delusions leading him to fear that history was going to repeat itself. Where the two Godfather films were expansive films traveling over thousands of miles and involving decades. they're open and airy and give you plenty of room to breathe. The Conversation is the opposite. It's a claustrophobic film that has you breathing heavy from the fear of what's closing in on us. The stinger on all of this is that even though there is no one nearby, you are being held close with the technology that lets you see and hear from elsewhere, which ironically has become even more prevalent forty years later with our advances in tech. The film itself serves as another Coppola classic from his prime era in the 1970's It's a great film that kind of gets pushed away due to the Godfather films. 70's grit at its finest, almost symbolizing the greatness of the cinema of the era.
    Chris G Super Reviewer
  • Apr 22, 2015
    A sophisticated and taut narrative in which Coppola does with sound what Antonioni had done with image in his Blow-up, following a paranoid man unable to open up to anybody and trying desperately to put the pieces together of something that he cannot understand.
    Carlos M Super Reviewer
  • Aug 26, 2013
    The narrative is as meticulous and paranoid as the central character (played by Gene Hackman in arguably his best performance), with every person and object in it exuding a kind of unsettling menace. Even if the surveillance equipment displayed here is dated, the technophobia at the film's heart isn't and I suspect that it will never be.
    Alec B Super Reviewer

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