Crooked Arrows Reviews

  • Apr 07, 2019

    The film is too long, lasts 1 hour and a half when it could be summarized in 30 minutes. It's so boring that it's not surprising that Brandon Routh's acting career has ended so quickly if he chose movies like this one and Superman Returns.

    The film is too long, lasts 1 hour and a half when it could be summarized in 30 minutes. It's so boring that it's not surprising that Brandon Routh's acting career has ended so quickly if he chose movies like this one and Superman Returns.

  • Jan 20, 2016

    Morning Sis, can u do me a big favor and send me a video birthday wish to Kirk n Ivolyn. Someone ask me to do a video slideshow for them and I'm using Kirk birthday pictures to practice. Thanks in advance

    Morning Sis, can u do me a big favor and send me a video birthday wish to Kirk n Ivolyn. Someone ask me to do a video slideshow for them and I'm using Kirk birthday pictures to practice. Thanks in advance

  • Jul 31, 2015

    Conceptually well established movie but lacks any effort from fellow actors

    Conceptually well established movie but lacks any effort from fellow actors

  • Mar 27, 2015

    this is a GREAT movie. enjoyable for all ages

    this is a GREAT movie. enjoyable for all ages

  • Mar 10, 2015

    As lacrosse becomes an always growing sport, the need for a movie to bring attention to it was desperately needed. Crooked Arrows does a good job of showing the audience the history and the tradition of the sport, but lacks in a sound plot and strong characters. The underdog story of the less equipped Native American team against the private schools, seems like too predictable of an outcome. Although the moves and dodges the teams perform are exciting, the movie's games seem to miss showing the fast pace of a real lacrosse game. The acting talent of the team and coaches just make the movie seem to go even slower. It has its comedic moments but they seem forced and played only for laughs.

    As lacrosse becomes an always growing sport, the need for a movie to bring attention to it was desperately needed. Crooked Arrows does a good job of showing the audience the history and the tradition of the sport, but lacks in a sound plot and strong characters. The underdog story of the less equipped Native American team against the private schools, seems like too predictable of an outcome. Although the moves and dodges the teams perform are exciting, the movie's games seem to miss showing the fast pace of a real lacrosse game. The acting talent of the team and coaches just make the movie seem to go even slower. It has its comedic moments but they seem forced and played only for laughs.

  • Sep 18, 2014

    Upon watching Steve Rash's 2012 film Crooked Arrows, I was blown away. More specifically, I was shocked by how awful this movie was. For trying to sell itself as an original movie about a less than mainstream sport, the sole fragment of originality is that it's the only recent large scale movie about lacrosse. With a variety of shoddy characteristics, a cliché storyline, and derogatory stereotypical racism, Crooked Arrows does not live up to its expectations. Set in present day New York, the heart of lacrosse country, a falling apart Native American based high school team appears to have no way to climb out of the depths of their dismal start to the season. In a (much) less than surprising turn of events (dare I warn you with a spoiler alert?), the team starts to find success. Examining the elements of this film, the acting, line delivery, and script all leave much to be desired. Seemingly out of place expressions and sloppy timing are rampant, and combining the two with a basic and cheesy script certainly does not disguise the subpar acting. What could have been an enthralling and powerful storyline is instead received less than half-heartedly as a shallow and ironic joke. Everything that is intended to be serious and filled with emotion comes off as empty and unintentionally laughable. Additionally, just when you think this movie can't possibly get any more clichéd, it does. There are three different instances of "unexpected" heroins; the interest conflicted coach, weak-link player, and impossibly dilapidated team that all exemplify the overused and groan worthy triumph that is the zero-to-hero. If you just cannot get enough of the rags-to-riches or worst-to-first storyline, this movie is for you. In many ways this film resembles a lacrosse version of Remember The Titans or We Are Marshall, except worse. I could manage to bear a cliché filled movie if it was at least presented in a creative and compelling way like those two films. As far as direction is concerned, a dismal performance is more than a compliment. Not only is the opening scene of ancestral Native American lacrosse a poor representation of that culture, its oversimplification for the movie's purposes serves more as an insult to Native American people than as a bridge to the rest of the film. No, Steve Rash, simply dressing a few actors with war paint on their faces and sending them howling after a ball is not a very effective transition scene, especially when the players' devotion throughout the rest of the movie is disposed towards honoring their own people's history. Throughout the movie typical stereotypes are presented, from Maug, described as a savage that can "catch and eat a deer with his bare hands", to the wise elder stereotype with character Crooked Arrow. The offensive oversimplification of important history and unoriginality of not even slightly moving away from the most common stereotypes does not impress. If you could not already tell, I would not highly recommend this film. Poor movie characteristics and a superficially clichéd plot combined with racism towards Native Americans do not make a recipe for success, and is especially not worthy of your valuable 105 minutes. Take your time elsewhere, anywhere else.

    Upon watching Steve Rash's 2012 film Crooked Arrows, I was blown away. More specifically, I was shocked by how awful this movie was. For trying to sell itself as an original movie about a less than mainstream sport, the sole fragment of originality is that it's the only recent large scale movie about lacrosse. With a variety of shoddy characteristics, a cliché storyline, and derogatory stereotypical racism, Crooked Arrows does not live up to its expectations. Set in present day New York, the heart of lacrosse country, a falling apart Native American based high school team appears to have no way to climb out of the depths of their dismal start to the season. In a (much) less than surprising turn of events (dare I warn you with a spoiler alert?), the team starts to find success. Examining the elements of this film, the acting, line delivery, and script all leave much to be desired. Seemingly out of place expressions and sloppy timing are rampant, and combining the two with a basic and cheesy script certainly does not disguise the subpar acting. What could have been an enthralling and powerful storyline is instead received less than half-heartedly as a shallow and ironic joke. Everything that is intended to be serious and filled with emotion comes off as empty and unintentionally laughable. Additionally, just when you think this movie can't possibly get any more clichéd, it does. There are three different instances of "unexpected" heroins; the interest conflicted coach, weak-link player, and impossibly dilapidated team that all exemplify the overused and groan worthy triumph that is the zero-to-hero. If you just cannot get enough of the rags-to-riches or worst-to-first storyline, this movie is for you. In many ways this film resembles a lacrosse version of Remember The Titans or We Are Marshall, except worse. I could manage to bear a cliché filled movie if it was at least presented in a creative and compelling way like those two films. As far as direction is concerned, a dismal performance is more than a compliment. Not only is the opening scene of ancestral Native American lacrosse a poor representation of that culture, its oversimplification for the movie's purposes serves more as an insult to Native American people than as a bridge to the rest of the film. No, Steve Rash, simply dressing a few actors with war paint on their faces and sending them howling after a ball is not a very effective transition scene, especially when the players' devotion throughout the rest of the movie is disposed towards honoring their own people's history. Throughout the movie typical stereotypes are presented, from Maug, described as a savage that can "catch and eat a deer with his bare hands", to the wise elder stereotype with character Crooked Arrow. The offensive oversimplification of important history and unoriginality of not even slightly moving away from the most common stereotypes does not impress. If you could not already tell, I would not highly recommend this film. Poor movie characteristics and a superficially clichéd plot combined with racism towards Native Americans do not make a recipe for success, and is especially not worthy of your valuable 105 minutes. Take your time elsewhere, anywhere else.

  • Apr 04, 2014

    A movie about lacrosse? Well u get what u expect a boring waste of time

    A movie about lacrosse? Well u get what u expect a boring waste of time

  • Mar 21, 2014

    One to forget and not to buy !

    One to forget and not to buy !

  • Jan 08, 2014

    Entirely watchable and feel-good, even though it's predictable.

    Entirely watchable and feel-good, even though it's predictable.

  • Dec 28, 2013

    It's a formula sports movie but I enjoyed learning about the cultural history of lacrosse and it was fun to watch. I'd have to give the coach extra points for his creative term for a V-Cut!

    It's a formula sports movie but I enjoyed learning about the cultural history of lacrosse and it was fun to watch. I'd have to give the coach extra points for his creative term for a V-Cut!