Dhoom: 2 Reviews

  • 2d ago

    Hrithik super roshan rocks

    Hrithik super roshan rocks

  • Oct 01, 2019

    Dance ... Action... Thrill everything is best Bollywood ka fast and furious ..

    Dance ... Action... Thrill everything is best Bollywood ka fast and furious ..

  • Jun 01, 2019

    why the movie starting

    why the movie starting

  • Nov 16, 2018

    Dhoom 2 is a Bollywood action thriller film, starring a star-studded cast of Hrithik Roshan, Uday Chopra, Abishek Bachan, Aishayan Rai, and Bipasha Basu. The protagonist of the film, Mr. A (Hrithik Roshan) is a highly skilled internationally renowned thief. From the onset, the cleverness and skill of "A" is demonstrated. The film begins with Mr. "A", an internationally renowned criminal, stealing the crown of England from a heavily secured train through disguise. This thievery triggers the events of the movie by causing officers Ali Khan (Uday Chopra) and Jai Dixit (Abhishek Bachchan) to be assigned to investigate the case. Although Mr. "A" is painted as a protagonist, it is never really clear who the clear cut "villians" are in the movie. The officers serve as opposing forces to Mr. A, yet, even the "officers" are painted as good guys through their goofiness and dialogue. This is marked contrast from traditional Bollywood "villians". As Rosie Thomas writes, Hindi "screen villians represent the antithesis of all that is valued in the moral order". It is evident though that this is not the case with the officers- we certainly sympathize with Jai Dixit for having to deal with the moodiness of his pregnant wife. In watching the movie, the viewer must be cognizant of the intended Bollywood audience. Those familiar with Western movies will have a hard time adjusting to the theatrics and length of Dhoom 2. At no point in the movie does Dhoom 2 try to maintain realism. In a similiar vein to Bollywood movies such as Kabhie Kushie Kabhi Gham, the film accepts and even embraces its silliness with overly cheesy lines ("Are you like....checking me out?") and impossible human feats. Viewers must maintain a suspension of disbelief for the duration of the film, and not judge the movie for its lack of realism. The choreography thus must be judged through different lenses. Through our Western lenses, the action and fight scenes might seem poorly executed, but the cheesy fight scenes are intentional by adding to the overall goofiness of Dhoom 2. More damning however is the lack of sophisticaion present through the movie. Unlike other silly Bollywood movies that either present a moral lesson or address a societal issue, Dhoom 2's sole mission is to sastify a viewer's primal desire for fast-paced action and attractive people. For a movie with such a star-studded cast, the lack of any redeeming intellectual qualities is a clear waste of talent. Although it is clearly evident the intended audience is different than say for example, that of Mother India, movies such as Main Hoon Na have shown that even cheesy action movies can be infused with sophistication and depth. Ultimately, this lack of sophistication manifests in a feeling of emptiness after 2 hours and 32 minutes of mindless watching. After watching, one must think to themselves if those 2 hours and 32 minutes could've been better spent doing something else.

    Dhoom 2 is a Bollywood action thriller film, starring a star-studded cast of Hrithik Roshan, Uday Chopra, Abishek Bachan, Aishayan Rai, and Bipasha Basu. The protagonist of the film, Mr. A (Hrithik Roshan) is a highly skilled internationally renowned thief. From the onset, the cleverness and skill of "A" is demonstrated. The film begins with Mr. "A", an internationally renowned criminal, stealing the crown of England from a heavily secured train through disguise. This thievery triggers the events of the movie by causing officers Ali Khan (Uday Chopra) and Jai Dixit (Abhishek Bachchan) to be assigned to investigate the case. Although Mr. "A" is painted as a protagonist, it is never really clear who the clear cut "villians" are in the movie. The officers serve as opposing forces to Mr. A, yet, even the "officers" are painted as good guys through their goofiness and dialogue. This is marked contrast from traditional Bollywood "villians". As Rosie Thomas writes, Hindi "screen villians represent the antithesis of all that is valued in the moral order". It is evident though that this is not the case with the officers- we certainly sympathize with Jai Dixit for having to deal with the moodiness of his pregnant wife. In watching the movie, the viewer must be cognizant of the intended Bollywood audience. Those familiar with Western movies will have a hard time adjusting to the theatrics and length of Dhoom 2. At no point in the movie does Dhoom 2 try to maintain realism. In a similiar vein to Bollywood movies such as Kabhie Kushie Kabhi Gham, the film accepts and even embraces its silliness with overly cheesy lines ("Are you like....checking me out?") and impossible human feats. Viewers must maintain a suspension of disbelief for the duration of the film, and not judge the movie for its lack of realism. The choreography thus must be judged through different lenses. Through our Western lenses, the action and fight scenes might seem poorly executed, but the cheesy fight scenes are intentional by adding to the overall goofiness of Dhoom 2. More damning however is the lack of sophisticaion present through the movie. Unlike other silly Bollywood movies that either present a moral lesson or address a societal issue, Dhoom 2's sole mission is to sastify a viewer's primal desire for fast-paced action and attractive people. For a movie with such a star-studded cast, the lack of any redeeming intellectual qualities is a clear waste of talent. Although it is clearly evident the intended audience is different than say for example, that of Mother India, movies such as Main Hoon Na have shown that even cheesy action movies can be infused with sophistication and depth. Ultimately, this lack of sophistication manifests in a feeling of emptiness after 2 hours and 32 minutes of mindless watching. After watching, one must think to themselves if those 2 hours and 32 minutes could've been better spent doing something else.

  • Nov 16, 2018

    Action, suspense, comedy, love- whatever you're in for, Dhoom 2 is sure to make you have a blast. The star-filled thriller costars Abhishek Bachchan (Jai), Uday Chopra (Ali), Hrithik Roshan (Mr. A) and Aishwaria Rai (Sunehri) amongst others, and the plot revolves around the classic "chor-police" or "thief and police" theme with an interesting twist. The movie starts off with Mr. A, the smartest thief and king of deception, stealing the crown from the Queen. Soon it transitions to Jai, the smartest cop and the king of investigation, finding the patterns of Mr. A and predicting his next heist. This two and a half hour long action-packed movie brings you along for a ride that embodies crime, heroism, betrayal and romance. My favorite aspect of the movie were the song and dance sequences starring Hrithik and Aishwaria. They glided across the dance floor with smooth moves, poise and charisma delineating their confidence, flirtatiousness and sexuality. The complex moral universe of characters' leads to every character having multiple levels of ethics and personality. This is perfectly summed up by Sunehri's conversation with Jai, when she describes Mr. A as an honorable thief, and Jai as a dishonorable police officer. This complicates things for the audience, and adds a twist to the "chor-police" theme since the audience does not know who to root for. As Ashish Nandy writes, in Bollywood, any character having mixture of good and evil traits has to be eventually shown as "essentially good," a side of Mr. A that the audience witnesses in his personal moments with Sunehri, as well as other small moments throughout the film. This is comparable to Vijay (Amitabh Bachchan) in Dewaar, where the audience see's the love for his mother as the trait that makes him "essentially good," despite him being a criminal. This dichotomy is integral to the core plot of the film, and generates a sense of positivity for the audience who look past the flaws of characters. The action-packed movie is filled with stunts, dances and so much entertainment. The only criticisms for me, however, is that the plot has many gaps, and there is not a clear moral code. This is a family movie, but heists are normalized and Mr. A is portrayed as a protagonist, which could have a negative impact on impressionable children watching the film. Nevertheless, even with the mix-ups and conundrums, Dhoom 2 is not a movie one should miss. It truly encapsulates over-dramatization, as well as elements of romance and music characteristic of Bollywood, coupled with slick, modern and well directed action-packed sequences.

    Action, suspense, comedy, love- whatever you're in for, Dhoom 2 is sure to make you have a blast. The star-filled thriller costars Abhishek Bachchan (Jai), Uday Chopra (Ali), Hrithik Roshan (Mr. A) and Aishwaria Rai (Sunehri) amongst others, and the plot revolves around the classic "chor-police" or "thief and police" theme with an interesting twist. The movie starts off with Mr. A, the smartest thief and king of deception, stealing the crown from the Queen. Soon it transitions to Jai, the smartest cop and the king of investigation, finding the patterns of Mr. A and predicting his next heist. This two and a half hour long action-packed movie brings you along for a ride that embodies crime, heroism, betrayal and romance. My favorite aspect of the movie were the song and dance sequences starring Hrithik and Aishwaria. They glided across the dance floor with smooth moves, poise and charisma delineating their confidence, flirtatiousness and sexuality. The complex moral universe of characters' leads to every character having multiple levels of ethics and personality. This is perfectly summed up by Sunehri's conversation with Jai, when she describes Mr. A as an honorable thief, and Jai as a dishonorable police officer. This complicates things for the audience, and adds a twist to the "chor-police" theme since the audience does not know who to root for. As Ashish Nandy writes, in Bollywood, any character having mixture of good and evil traits has to be eventually shown as "essentially good," a side of Mr. A that the audience witnesses in his personal moments with Sunehri, as well as other small moments throughout the film. This is comparable to Vijay (Amitabh Bachchan) in Dewaar, where the audience see's the love for his mother as the trait that makes him "essentially good," despite him being a criminal. This dichotomy is integral to the core plot of the film, and generates a sense of positivity for the audience who look past the flaws of characters. The action-packed movie is filled with stunts, dances and so much entertainment. The only criticisms for me, however, is that the plot has many gaps, and there is not a clear moral code. This is a family movie, but heists are normalized and Mr. A is portrayed as a protagonist, which could have a negative impact on impressionable children watching the film. Nevertheless, even with the mix-ups and conundrums, Dhoom 2 is not a movie one should miss. It truly encapsulates over-dramatization, as well as elements of romance and music characteristic of Bollywood, coupled with slick, modern and well directed action-packed sequences.

  • Nov 11, 2018

    Dhoom 2 is an epic film which follows the struggle between the thief Mr. A played by Hrithik Roshan and the two policemen from Bombay, Jai Dixit and Ali Akbar Fateh Khan played by Abishek Bachchan and Uday Chopra, respectively. It appears to draw heavily from Hollywood action films, yet also manages to weave in the charming characteristics of Bollywood cinema. Starting with what I personally enjoyed about the film, the aspects that were most enjoyable were the introductions of each of the characters and the development of the relationship between Hrithik Roshan and Aishwarya Rai's characters. Expanding more on the first point, the introduction that particularly stood out was that of Rai's character, Sunehri. Beginning with an over-the-top disrobing and concluding with the iconic quote, "Are you like... checking me out?", Rai's character is fun, flirty, and embodies the adventurous nature of the film with open arms. A parallel to classic female characters in spy films, Sunehri puts a refreshing twist on what may be normally expected from a stereotypical representation. As for the development between Mr. A and Sunehri, what begins as a one-sided yearning from the side of Sunehri eventually develops into a kind of love that those familiar with Bollywood cinema would come to expect. Similar to the relationship between Aamir Khan and Juhi Chawla in Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak, what Roshan and Rai's characters have is a true love, one that has the implicit support of the moral universe and finds itself unyielding even in the face of death. My least favorite part of the film would have to be the repetitive sequences, specifically near the end of the film when Roshan's character passes a gun between him and Rai, ordering her to shoot him and himself to shoot her. Though it appears to be an extreme example of love-demonstration and the power it holds, it's presented in a jarring and incongruous way with respect to the entirety of the film. Furthermore, there is a lack of the traditional "parent" aspect to the relationship. According to Rachel Dwyer on Romance and Marriage in Contemporary Hindi Cinema, "Hindi cinema operates in a melodramatic mode where the sacred is displaced onto the family and the nation, and the hero negotiates a space for himself and his love within the family." (65)1 Throughout Dhoom 2, there is no "negotiation of space" nor family within the context of the film. The love is purely of and for the self, and makes no attempt at connecting it to a larger frame. Personally, I believe it would have served to strengthen the kinship between the two lovers had there been not only a moral and ethical quandary, but also one of familial significance. However, it was overall enjoyable and I would definitely recommend it as a first movie to those unacquainted with the Bollywood genre.

    Dhoom 2 is an epic film which follows the struggle between the thief Mr. A played by Hrithik Roshan and the two policemen from Bombay, Jai Dixit and Ali Akbar Fateh Khan played by Abishek Bachchan and Uday Chopra, respectively. It appears to draw heavily from Hollywood action films, yet also manages to weave in the charming characteristics of Bollywood cinema. Starting with what I personally enjoyed about the film, the aspects that were most enjoyable were the introductions of each of the characters and the development of the relationship between Hrithik Roshan and Aishwarya Rai's characters. Expanding more on the first point, the introduction that particularly stood out was that of Rai's character, Sunehri. Beginning with an over-the-top disrobing and concluding with the iconic quote, "Are you like... checking me out?", Rai's character is fun, flirty, and embodies the adventurous nature of the film with open arms. A parallel to classic female characters in spy films, Sunehri puts a refreshing twist on what may be normally expected from a stereotypical representation. As for the development between Mr. A and Sunehri, what begins as a one-sided yearning from the side of Sunehri eventually develops into a kind of love that those familiar with Bollywood cinema would come to expect. Similar to the relationship between Aamir Khan and Juhi Chawla in Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak, what Roshan and Rai's characters have is a true love, one that has the implicit support of the moral universe and finds itself unyielding even in the face of death. My least favorite part of the film would have to be the repetitive sequences, specifically near the end of the film when Roshan's character passes a gun between him and Rai, ordering her to shoot him and himself to shoot her. Though it appears to be an extreme example of love-demonstration and the power it holds, it's presented in a jarring and incongruous way with respect to the entirety of the film. Furthermore, there is a lack of the traditional "parent" aspect to the relationship. According to Rachel Dwyer on Romance and Marriage in Contemporary Hindi Cinema, "Hindi cinema operates in a melodramatic mode where the sacred is displaced onto the family and the nation, and the hero negotiates a space for himself and his love within the family." (65)1 Throughout Dhoom 2, there is no "negotiation of space" nor family within the context of the film. The love is purely of and for the self, and makes no attempt at connecting it to a larger frame. Personally, I believe it would have served to strengthen the kinship between the two lovers had there been not only a moral and ethical quandary, but also one of familial significance. However, it was overall enjoyable and I would definitely recommend it as a first movie to those unacquainted with the Bollywood genre.

  • Oct 02, 2016

    As is usually the case, the sequel is not as good as the original; in this case, the original was no masterpiece, either.

    As is usually the case, the sequel is not as good as the original; in this case, the original was no masterpiece, either.

  • May 05, 2016

    The songs are nice and catchy, the story is different and Hrithik does a good job as the thief, but the stupid mistakes in the movie make the movie annoying, and so does the unnecessary roles of some characters, on top that the ending feels as if it was written in the last minute.

    The songs are nice and catchy, the story is different and Hrithik does a good job as the thief, but the stupid mistakes in the movie make the movie annoying, and so does the unnecessary roles of some characters, on top that the ending feels as if it was written in the last minute.

  • Jul 18, 2015

    Entertaining action ridiculousness.

    Entertaining action ridiculousness.

  • Jan 04, 2015

    ONE OF MY FAVORITE MOVIES OF ALL TIME

    ONE OF MY FAVORITE MOVIES OF ALL TIME