The Doors Reviews

  • Jul 02, 2020

    Good music. Messed up movie. No clear narrative direction. Seems like it's just made up of snippets from his life. Well, it IS an Oliver Stone movie! It's not NOT entertaining, but it could be so much more captivating.

    Good music. Messed up movie. No clear narrative direction. Seems like it's just made up of snippets from his life. Well, it IS an Oliver Stone movie! It's not NOT entertaining, but it could be so much more captivating.

  • Apr 07, 2020

    Not knowing much of the story, I have learned quite a bit with this. Glad he didn't die of an overdose. He comes out as quite an irresponsible guy, drunk and high most of the time. The other band members are the ones that made Jim pallatable. Long film and the tomatometer says the film missed the circus around him? Could there be enough material for a miniserie?

    Not knowing much of the story, I have learned quite a bit with this. Glad he didn't die of an overdose. He comes out as quite an irresponsible guy, drunk and high most of the time. The other band members are the ones that made Jim pallatable. Long film and the tomatometer says the film missed the circus around him? Could there be enough material for a miniserie?

  • Feb 03, 2020

    I guess I'm just saying this because I'm not into poetry but I think that Morrison's poetry was kind of pretentious. Seeing Val Kilmer in a wow, it's kind of hard to take it seriously. It seems that Stone is trying to get across that Morrison was kind of a misunderstood mysterious shy guy. I think one of the best things to watch was how the bandmates would all play off each other and watch how they came up with the ideas that made some of their best songs. I will say Oliver Stone seems to have gone too edgy in this movie. Morrison's comfortability at breaking the boundaries and following his own rules seems to be the things that pushed him forward into being the icon that he was. Morrison seemed to have figures that followed him in his life, Native Americans that sort of sent him messages. If the movie portrays it right, it seems like Morrison was always fucked up on something whether it be drugs or alcohol or both. That Andy Warhol party was fucking weird. Tranny's and shit and the way everyone acted was so weird. Morrison's problem was that he dwelled in the abyss for too long. He didn't really tackle his problems of upbringing. Deep down inside he was a dark guy who thought about death frequently. His past kept haunting him. I like how death was personified as that tall bald guy. He was with Jim everywhere he went. I can't help but feel that Stone was portraying The Doors as kind of like a cult. Not the best biographical music movie but it was entertaining to watch and a trip at times. Kilmer killed it portraying Morrison. I wish the movie weren't so bombastic and edgy and could have focused more on Morrison's childhood and upbringing and could have shed more light as to why Morrison was so reckless with his life. We caught a glimpse, but we could have seen more. Nevertheless, it was a great watch.

    I guess I'm just saying this because I'm not into poetry but I think that Morrison's poetry was kind of pretentious. Seeing Val Kilmer in a wow, it's kind of hard to take it seriously. It seems that Stone is trying to get across that Morrison was kind of a misunderstood mysterious shy guy. I think one of the best things to watch was how the bandmates would all play off each other and watch how they came up with the ideas that made some of their best songs. I will say Oliver Stone seems to have gone too edgy in this movie. Morrison's comfortability at breaking the boundaries and following his own rules seems to be the things that pushed him forward into being the icon that he was. Morrison seemed to have figures that followed him in his life, Native Americans that sort of sent him messages. If the movie portrays it right, it seems like Morrison was always fucked up on something whether it be drugs or alcohol or both. That Andy Warhol party was fucking weird. Tranny's and shit and the way everyone acted was so weird. Morrison's problem was that he dwelled in the abyss for too long. He didn't really tackle his problems of upbringing. Deep down inside he was a dark guy who thought about death frequently. His past kept haunting him. I like how death was personified as that tall bald guy. He was with Jim everywhere he went. I can't help but feel that Stone was portraying The Doors as kind of like a cult. Not the best biographical music movie but it was entertaining to watch and a trip at times. Kilmer killed it portraying Morrison. I wish the movie weren't so bombastic and edgy and could have focused more on Morrison's childhood and upbringing and could have shed more light as to why Morrison was so reckless with his life. We caught a glimpse, but we could have seen more. Nevertheless, it was a great watch.

  • Nov 07, 2019

    zero stars. The Doors is a fraud. Not a biography. Not a work of art. But a fraud.

    zero stars. The Doors is a fraud. Not a biography. Not a work of art. But a fraud.

  • Nov 03, 2019

    Granted, "The Doors" eschews historical precision for sensory-driven, impressionistic indulgences. This isn't a biographical deep-dive of Jim Morrison's mind, but then again, director Oliver Stone never offered that intention. Even the deepest-thinking rock stars carry a cartoonish projection by virtue of their chosen vocation, and this film's indulgence in dramatized character elements are true to form. Val Kilmer's performance as Morrison remains much maligned, but is absolutely in line with Hollywood's exploitations of rock n roll mythology. Kilmer inhabits the sketch with a contrived detachment directly reflective of what Stone was going for throughout the movie. Shot in the era in which impressionist rock videos reigned supreme, "The Doors" leverages those rich indulgences, and marries it with the band's remarkable, unassailable music catalog. Highly recommended, just not for those who expect to find Jim Morrison pontificating from the psychiatrist's sofa. WATCHED IT? THEN WATCHLIST: "This Is Spinal Tap," "Stadium Anthems," "High Fidelity."

    Granted, "The Doors" eschews historical precision for sensory-driven, impressionistic indulgences. This isn't a biographical deep-dive of Jim Morrison's mind, but then again, director Oliver Stone never offered that intention. Even the deepest-thinking rock stars carry a cartoonish projection by virtue of their chosen vocation, and this film's indulgence in dramatized character elements are true to form. Val Kilmer's performance as Morrison remains much maligned, but is absolutely in line with Hollywood's exploitations of rock n roll mythology. Kilmer inhabits the sketch with a contrived detachment directly reflective of what Stone was going for throughout the movie. Shot in the era in which impressionist rock videos reigned supreme, "The Doors" leverages those rich indulgences, and marries it with the band's remarkable, unassailable music catalog. Highly recommended, just not for those who expect to find Jim Morrison pontificating from the psychiatrist's sofa. WATCHED IT? THEN WATCHLIST: "This Is Spinal Tap," "Stadium Anthems," "High Fidelity."

  • Sep 29, 2019

    I would recommend this movie to anyone who listens to or at least likes classic rock. If you don't know The Doors, what are you doing with your life? To start off, this movie was about 70% accurate to reality. The rest was exaggerated or 1 year behind the actual story line. Sure it was a great film, but I feel like it should have been a tad longer. About 20 minutes to cover the recording of "The End" where after recording "The End," Jim Morrison returned to the studio on LSD and hosed the band's equipment with a fire extinguisher, or the recording f the Break On Through music video, or the famous Doors album billboard. But this movie's from 1991. I guess Oliver Stone did a good job. Overall it was a great film. But I recently heard Ray Manzarek say he wanted to "sock Stone in the face" in an interview. Yikes. 85/100.

    I would recommend this movie to anyone who listens to or at least likes classic rock. If you don't know The Doors, what are you doing with your life? To start off, this movie was about 70% accurate to reality. The rest was exaggerated or 1 year behind the actual story line. Sure it was a great film, but I feel like it should have been a tad longer. About 20 minutes to cover the recording of "The End" where after recording "The End," Jim Morrison returned to the studio on LSD and hosed the band's equipment with a fire extinguisher, or the recording f the Break On Through music video, or the famous Doors album billboard. But this movie's from 1991. I guess Oliver Stone did a good job. Overall it was a great film. But I recently heard Ray Manzarek say he wanted to "sock Stone in the face" in an interview. Yikes. 85/100.

  • Sep 23, 2019

    "Very pretentious, Jim, not easy to follow. A little incoherent. Dancing bears, Nazism, masturbation, what's next?" Jim Morrison... as depicted in this movie... is a pretentious, alcoholic rock god who certainly lived like there's no tomorrow and thusly died at the age of 27. Oliver Stone had a streak like no other between Platoon and Nixon. Just great film after great film. I think it was Siskel or Ebert who said if you take the movies set in the 60s that Stone made in that period you have maybe the best cinematic document on the 1960s anyone's made. I can't argue with that. Even while not liking this movie I can't. But yeah I didn't like this one. I'm not a The Doors fan, really. I like a couple of their songs, LA Woman's a great one... too bad it doesn't get a drop until literally the last scene. But I'm not a guy who think s Jim Morrison was some kind of genius and The Doors were anywhere close to the best musical act to come out of the 60s. I think the best use of The Doors is and always will be how Coppola used The End in Apocalypse Now... something the band had nothing to do with. This movie... treats The Doors like they WERE the best musical act to come out of the 60s. And by the end of the movie I was simple not convinced. There's movies like Once Upon a Time in Hollywood that make the 60s look fantastic and make me wish I was there.... and then there's movies like this that make me glad I missed it. This is a misstep by Oliver Stone in many ways. It's not poorly made, actually the direction and acting is excellent. It's just just not engaging on the level of other movies Stone made in that period. Like it's an hour shorter than JFK and feels an hour longer, that's no good. This movie didn't feel like it had a point, it was just an aimless and meandering telling of how The Doors got started, got famous and eventually ended with Morrison's death. But it's not a fun kind of musical biopic where I end up liking the band when the movie's over. Straight Outta Compton was such a fun movie I ended up becoming a fan of NWA when it was over. But this movie... much like Jim Morrison's character in the movie... comes off as so pretentious acting like The Doors were the best thing the 60s ever produced.... and I don't see it. Right off the bat we see Morrison in UCLA Film School where he shows a short film he made of him reading poetry and the class mocks him for how pretentious it is and all I could think was "Yeah... this is exactly my reaction to this man, too." But the performances were great. Val Kilmer, a great actor in the right role is outstanding as Morrison and I mean... it's gotta be the most uncanny resemblance an actor has had to the person they're portraying in movie history. But Kilmer wasn't given much to do here other than be drunk for 2 hours and 20 minutes. Morrison never has a moment where he's coherent or likable. Kinda reminds me of Rami Malek in Bohemian Rhapsody, a movie I was sadly reminded of throughout as an example of the bad kind of musical biopic. Kyle Machlachlan astonishingly plays the most down to earth character in the movie and how many times can you say that about his work? I thought he was great as the keyboardist for The Doors. It was weird how a band you'd think would be high on mushrooms their whole waking lives... actually in this movie it's kinda just Morrison and the other guys were the straight men as it were. Kathleen Quinlan's a favorite character actress of mine and I thought she was great as this hypersexual witch-like journalist that has an affair with Morrison. There's no bad actor in the movie. Oliver Stone himself shows up as Morrison's film school teacher and he hits the nail right on the head talking about the entire movie when he's criticizing Morrison's short film: "Very pretentious, Jim, not easy to follow. A little incoherent. Dancing bears, Nazism, masturbation, what's next?" I've seen better and worse musical biopics and I've seen way better Oliver Stone movies. This one's a swing and a miss.

    "Very pretentious, Jim, not easy to follow. A little incoherent. Dancing bears, Nazism, masturbation, what's next?" Jim Morrison... as depicted in this movie... is a pretentious, alcoholic rock god who certainly lived like there's no tomorrow and thusly died at the age of 27. Oliver Stone had a streak like no other between Platoon and Nixon. Just great film after great film. I think it was Siskel or Ebert who said if you take the movies set in the 60s that Stone made in that period you have maybe the best cinematic document on the 1960s anyone's made. I can't argue with that. Even while not liking this movie I can't. But yeah I didn't like this one. I'm not a The Doors fan, really. I like a couple of their songs, LA Woman's a great one... too bad it doesn't get a drop until literally the last scene. But I'm not a guy who think s Jim Morrison was some kind of genius and The Doors were anywhere close to the best musical act to come out of the 60s. I think the best use of The Doors is and always will be how Coppola used The End in Apocalypse Now... something the band had nothing to do with. This movie... treats The Doors like they WERE the best musical act to come out of the 60s. And by the end of the movie I was simple not convinced. There's movies like Once Upon a Time in Hollywood that make the 60s look fantastic and make me wish I was there.... and then there's movies like this that make me glad I missed it. This is a misstep by Oliver Stone in many ways. It's not poorly made, actually the direction and acting is excellent. It's just just not engaging on the level of other movies Stone made in that period. Like it's an hour shorter than JFK and feels an hour longer, that's no good. This movie didn't feel like it had a point, it was just an aimless and meandering telling of how The Doors got started, got famous and eventually ended with Morrison's death. But it's not a fun kind of musical biopic where I end up liking the band when the movie's over. Straight Outta Compton was such a fun movie I ended up becoming a fan of NWA when it was over. But this movie... much like Jim Morrison's character in the movie... comes off as so pretentious acting like The Doors were the best thing the 60s ever produced.... and I don't see it. Right off the bat we see Morrison in UCLA Film School where he shows a short film he made of him reading poetry and the class mocks him for how pretentious it is and all I could think was "Yeah... this is exactly my reaction to this man, too." But the performances were great. Val Kilmer, a great actor in the right role is outstanding as Morrison and I mean... it's gotta be the most uncanny resemblance an actor has had to the person they're portraying in movie history. But Kilmer wasn't given much to do here other than be drunk for 2 hours and 20 minutes. Morrison never has a moment where he's coherent or likable. Kinda reminds me of Rami Malek in Bohemian Rhapsody, a movie I was sadly reminded of throughout as an example of the bad kind of musical biopic. Kyle Machlachlan astonishingly plays the most down to earth character in the movie and how many times can you say that about his work? I thought he was great as the keyboardist for The Doors. It was weird how a band you'd think would be high on mushrooms their whole waking lives... actually in this movie it's kinda just Morrison and the other guys were the straight men as it were. Kathleen Quinlan's a favorite character actress of mine and I thought she was great as this hypersexual witch-like journalist that has an affair with Morrison. There's no bad actor in the movie. Oliver Stone himself shows up as Morrison's film school teacher and he hits the nail right on the head talking about the entire movie when he's criticizing Morrison's short film: "Very pretentious, Jim, not easy to follow. A little incoherent. Dancing bears, Nazism, masturbation, what's next?" I've seen better and worse musical biopics and I've seen way better Oliver Stone movies. This one's a swing and a miss.

  • Aug 30, 2019

    An insane acid trip of a biopic! Oliver Stone takes the drug fueled, poetic heart, and rambling mind of Jim Morrison and brings him to life in his music biopic simply entitled The Doors (1991). It is certainly slow, long, and meandering, but The Doors also captures Jim Morrison's earnest poetry, his electric presence, captivating frontman persona, passionate moody singer, and crazed recklessness. I love The Doors for their creative spark, impressive technical prowess, poetic lyrics, sincere groundbreaking, and complete originality. The film absolutely holds you in its magnetic grip, gazing into the dilated eyes of a strung out Morrison as he gazes back at you deep into your soul. Stone's writing implies that Morrison was hurting constantly, hating life, and desiring death, but I think there was also a brilliant artist. Morrison wrote amateur poetry as he clearly wanted so desperately to be a real poet, but his real eternal poetry lies in his visceral lyrics. The music of The Doors will last forever as a testament to a time of drug indulgence, erratic behavior, free love, and inspiring creativity. The film The Doors manages to construct a fairly believable persona of what Jim Morrison was like as a person thanks to Val Kilmer's uncanny resemblance, real singing, and hypnotic gravitas. Kilmer transforms himself into a magician of musical bliss, intrigue, mystique, and aimless nihilism. If Morrison really wanted to die, he certainly lived his life with no restraints. He was a man shouting into the ether of the universe begging for attention, validation, and comfort. I wonder if he found any peace ever? Oliver Stone's direction recreates America during 1965 through 1971 with a careful eye. The outfits, buildings, music, celebrities, attitudes, drugs, parties, concerts, and speech all feel genuine to the era. You are riveted by the story of The Doors and held in suspense waiting for Jim Morrison to die. I just wish that there were more attention given to the fascinating band members of The Doors, instead of solely focusing on the legendary frontman Jim Morrison. Stone's editing choices obviously were intentional to simulate a peyote or an acid trip, which makes The Doors a transcendent film, and an annoying one at times. Just when you understand how broken and destructive Morrison was, you get little of The Doors' career as a group. The major concerts and infamous incidents are covered, but not more intimate moments between the band. I wanted more of the latter and less of the former for a more coherent story. The drug induced atmosphere is intense and an experience all its own, but Oliver Stone went overboard in his dedication to harnessing The Doors' psychedelic magic power. In addition to Val Kilmer's iconic performance as Jim Morrison, The Doors contains several sublime supporting roles. Meg Ryan captures the flower child, drug addict, free lover Pamela Courson with a mesmerizing presence all her own. Kyle MacLachlan depicts legendary organist Ray Manzarek with an earnest sympathy for his struggle of coping with his friend Morrison unravelling as well as fame and family. Manzarek was the steadfast leader of The Doors as a band and a voice of conscience clearly desperate to save his friend. MacLachlan was inspired casting, much like Kilmer as Morrison. Furthermore, Frank Whaley is perfect as unique lead guitarist Robby Krieger. His sweet hippie friend to Morrison is touching as he simply desired to make music with his friends. Whaley's portrayal of Robby Krieger really captures his dour guitar playing and bursts of energy in his dreamy guitar playing. Whaley involves you to demonstrate what a genius Robby Krieger was at his instrument. Krieger captured a blend of blues and Spanish guitar styles alongside Ray Manzarek's classical organ, John Densmore's jazz drumming, and Jim Morrison poetic lyrics with his melancholic blues rock singing for a genuinely original sound for The Doors. Kevin Dillon is fierce as Densmore and brings an energy to his portrayal and drumming. Otherwise, Michael Wincott's gravelly voice as Paul Rothchild is distinct and even reaches sincere heights as he begs Morrison not to overdose like Janis Joplin. It's too bad Morrison never listened to Rothschild, Manzarek, Krieger, or Densmore or he might have had a longer life. Michael Madsen plays a drunken actor pal of Morrison's bent on aiding Morrison's quest of self-destruction. Kathleen Quinlan is hypnotizing as the alluring Patricia Kennealy, who Jim Morrison had an affair with much to the dismay of Meg Ryan's increasingly delirious Pam. The Doors just keeps delivers cool cameos left and right from Kelly Hu as Dorothy to Wes Studi as an Indian in the desert. Even Crispin Glover appears as a wide eyed Andy Warhol. In all, Oliver Stone's The Doors is not immaculate in its execution or editing, it is ambitious and earnest in its depiction of The Doors. I wish the rest of the band had more screen time, but Val Kilmer is such an all encompassing actor here that you might not even notice. The Doors is a classic biopic despite its flaws.

    An insane acid trip of a biopic! Oliver Stone takes the drug fueled, poetic heart, and rambling mind of Jim Morrison and brings him to life in his music biopic simply entitled The Doors (1991). It is certainly slow, long, and meandering, but The Doors also captures Jim Morrison's earnest poetry, his electric presence, captivating frontman persona, passionate moody singer, and crazed recklessness. I love The Doors for their creative spark, impressive technical prowess, poetic lyrics, sincere groundbreaking, and complete originality. The film absolutely holds you in its magnetic grip, gazing into the dilated eyes of a strung out Morrison as he gazes back at you deep into your soul. Stone's writing implies that Morrison was hurting constantly, hating life, and desiring death, but I think there was also a brilliant artist. Morrison wrote amateur poetry as he clearly wanted so desperately to be a real poet, but his real eternal poetry lies in his visceral lyrics. The music of The Doors will last forever as a testament to a time of drug indulgence, erratic behavior, free love, and inspiring creativity. The film The Doors manages to construct a fairly believable persona of what Jim Morrison was like as a person thanks to Val Kilmer's uncanny resemblance, real singing, and hypnotic gravitas. Kilmer transforms himself into a magician of musical bliss, intrigue, mystique, and aimless nihilism. If Morrison really wanted to die, he certainly lived his life with no restraints. He was a man shouting into the ether of the universe begging for attention, validation, and comfort. I wonder if he found any peace ever? Oliver Stone's direction recreates America during 1965 through 1971 with a careful eye. The outfits, buildings, music, celebrities, attitudes, drugs, parties, concerts, and speech all feel genuine to the era. You are riveted by the story of The Doors and held in suspense waiting for Jim Morrison to die. I just wish that there were more attention given to the fascinating band members of The Doors, instead of solely focusing on the legendary frontman Jim Morrison. Stone's editing choices obviously were intentional to simulate a peyote or an acid trip, which makes The Doors a transcendent film, and an annoying one at times. Just when you understand how broken and destructive Morrison was, you get little of The Doors' career as a group. The major concerts and infamous incidents are covered, but not more intimate moments between the band. I wanted more of the latter and less of the former for a more coherent story. The drug induced atmosphere is intense and an experience all its own, but Oliver Stone went overboard in his dedication to harnessing The Doors' psychedelic magic power. In addition to Val Kilmer's iconic performance as Jim Morrison, The Doors contains several sublime supporting roles. Meg Ryan captures the flower child, drug addict, free lover Pamela Courson with a mesmerizing presence all her own. Kyle MacLachlan depicts legendary organist Ray Manzarek with an earnest sympathy for his struggle of coping with his friend Morrison unravelling as well as fame and family. Manzarek was the steadfast leader of The Doors as a band and a voice of conscience clearly desperate to save his friend. MacLachlan was inspired casting, much like Kilmer as Morrison. Furthermore, Frank Whaley is perfect as unique lead guitarist Robby Krieger. His sweet hippie friend to Morrison is touching as he simply desired to make music with his friends. Whaley's portrayal of Robby Krieger really captures his dour guitar playing and bursts of energy in his dreamy guitar playing. Whaley involves you to demonstrate what a genius Robby Krieger was at his instrument. Krieger captured a blend of blues and Spanish guitar styles alongside Ray Manzarek's classical organ, John Densmore's jazz drumming, and Jim Morrison poetic lyrics with his melancholic blues rock singing for a genuinely original sound for The Doors. Kevin Dillon is fierce as Densmore and brings an energy to his portrayal and drumming. Otherwise, Michael Wincott's gravelly voice as Paul Rothchild is distinct and even reaches sincere heights as he begs Morrison not to overdose like Janis Joplin. It's too bad Morrison never listened to Rothschild, Manzarek, Krieger, or Densmore or he might have had a longer life. Michael Madsen plays a drunken actor pal of Morrison's bent on aiding Morrison's quest of self-destruction. Kathleen Quinlan is hypnotizing as the alluring Patricia Kennealy, who Jim Morrison had an affair with much to the dismay of Meg Ryan's increasingly delirious Pam. The Doors just keeps delivers cool cameos left and right from Kelly Hu as Dorothy to Wes Studi as an Indian in the desert. Even Crispin Glover appears as a wide eyed Andy Warhol. In all, Oliver Stone's The Doors is not immaculate in its execution or editing, it is ambitious and earnest in its depiction of The Doors. I wish the rest of the band had more screen time, but Val Kilmer is such an all encompassing actor here that you might not even notice. The Doors is a classic biopic despite its flaws.

  • Aug 12, 2019

    Before "Bohemian Rhapsody," there was a film which is nearly two-and-a-half hours of the ever-poetic "Jim Morrison" getting wasted by sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll. Excellent movie from start to finish.

    Before "Bohemian Rhapsody," there was a film which is nearly two-and-a-half hours of the ever-poetic "Jim Morrison" getting wasted by sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll. Excellent movie from start to finish.

  • Aug 09, 2019

    Amazing rock biopic. They literally don't make them like this anymore. You can tell this was a passion project for director Oliver Stone, who apparently has Doors music forever integrated in his mind with respect to his military experience in Vietnam. He painstakingly recreates the mood and aesthetic of the late 60's psychedelic period, moving the story along quickly and stylistically, steadfastly focused on his protagonist Jim Morrison's' journey as enigmatic rock super god whose burning bright flame died out tragically too soon at the age of 27. The low tomatometer on this site is proof positive that critics are just dickheads.

    Amazing rock biopic. They literally don't make them like this anymore. You can tell this was a passion project for director Oliver Stone, who apparently has Doors music forever integrated in his mind with respect to his military experience in Vietnam. He painstakingly recreates the mood and aesthetic of the late 60's psychedelic period, moving the story along quickly and stylistically, steadfastly focused on his protagonist Jim Morrison's' journey as enigmatic rock super god whose burning bright flame died out tragically too soon at the age of 27. The low tomatometer on this site is proof positive that critics are just dickheads.