Dracula - Dead and Loving It (1995) - Rotten Tomatoes

Dracula - Dead and Loving It (1995)

Dracula - Dead and Loving It (1995)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Dracula - Dead and Loving It Photos

Movie Info

The legend of Dracula and its numerous film adaptations provide the basis for this largely unsuccessful parody. The famous count, who here happens to be remarkably klutzy, faces off against determined vampire hunter Van Helsing against a background of broadly humorous gags and slapstick comedy.
Rating:
PG-13
Genre:
Comedy
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:
WARNER BROTHERS PICTURES

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Cast

Leslie Nielsen
as Dracula
Peter MacNicol
as Renfield
Steven Weber
as Harker
Harvey Korman
as Dr. Seward
Mel Brooks
as Professor Van Helsing
Chuck McCann
as Innkeeper
Avery Schreiber
as Peasant in Coach
Cherie Franklin
as Peasant in Coach
Ezio Greggio
as Coach Driver
Leslie S. Sachs
as Usherette
Matthew Porretta
as Handsome Lieutenant at Ball
Darla Haun
as Brunette Vampire
Karen Roe
as Blond Vampire
Maud Winchester
as Ballroom Guest
Charlie Callas
as Man in Straight Jacket
Phillip Connery
as Ship Captain
Tony Griffin
as Crewman
Casey King
as Crewman
Nick Rempel
as Crewman
Zale Kessler
as Orchestra Leader
Barbaree Earl
as Ballroom Guest
Carol Arthur
as Villager
Maura Nielsen Kaplan
as Ballroom Guest
Thea Nielsen Disney
as Ballroom Guest
Robin Shepard
as Ballroom Guest
Elaine Ballace
as Ballroom Guest
Shirley Kirkes
as Ballroom Dancer
Maude Winchester
as Ballroom Guest
Manette LaChance
as Ballroom Dancer
Lisa Cordray
as Hat Check Girl
Cindy Marshall-Day
as Young Lover at Picnic
Stan Mazin
as Ballroom Dancer
Jody Peterson
as Ballroom Dancer
Benjamin Livingston
as Young Lover at Picnic
Gregg Binkley
as Woodbridge
Alton Ruff
as Ballroom Dancer
Anne Bancroft
as Gypsy Woman
David DeLuise
as Intern
Tommy Koenig
as Intern
Audrey Baranishyn
as Ballroom Dancer
Vince Grant
as Intern
Jeffrey Broadhurst
as Ballroom Dancer
Ric Coy
as Intern
Kevin Scott Crawford
as Ballroom Dancer
Carol DeLuise
as Villager
Sonje Fortag
as Villager
Henry Kaiser
as Villager
Loraine Shields
as Villager
John Frayer
as Ballroom Dancer
Ira Miller
as Villager
Kathleen Kane
as Villager
Ben Livingston
as Young Lover at Picnic
David Savoy
as Specialty Dancer
Sharon Savoy
as Specialty Dancer
Tricia McFarlin-Mattson
as Ballroom Dancer
Anne McVey
as Ballroom Dancer
Delores Nemiro
as Ballroom Dancer
Jim Peace
as Ballroom Dancer
Dennon Rawles
as Ballroom Dancer
Sandra Rovetta
as Ballroom Dancer
Blane Savage
as Ballroom Dancer
Ted Sprague
as Ballroom Dancer
Jude Van Wormer
as Ballroom Dancer
Alan Walls
as Ballroom Dancer
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Critic Reviews for Dracula - Dead and Loving It

All Critics (36) | Top Critics (11)

Either this is the lamest Mel Brooks comedy ever or it's too close to other contenders to make much difference.

Full Review… | October 20, 2009
Chicago Reader
Top Critic

The only real sparks are set off by MacNicol as Renfield, the solicitor who develops a taste for flies and spiders after being bitten by Dracula.

Full Review… | March 26, 2009
Variety
Top Critic

Brooks, as Van Helsing, is one of the more successful aspects, but he hasn't imbued in his stock company a similar ability to rise above their underwritten roles.

Full Review… | January 26, 2006
Time Out
Top Critic

Slight but amusing.

May 20, 2003
New York Times
Top Critic

Not to venture forth some sort of radical idea, but aren't comedies supposed to have jokes?

Full Review… | August 15, 2002
Los Angeles Times
Top Critic

It's a toothless parody that misses more often than it hits.

Full Review… | January 1, 2000
ReelViews
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Dracula - Dead and Loving It

Another dodgy film title and arguably Mel Brooks last decent spoof after a long career in film led to a brief spell in the theatre as things started to wind down. In fact this was Brooks last major film in which he starred and directed. Now I must admit that when I first saw the film I didn't really like it much, the whole thing looked cheap, tacky and wasn't overly funny. But the strangest thing, like with other Brooks films, I have found myself appreciating it a lot more over the years. Like his other spoofs this has pot shots at various classic vampire films over the years but the main target is of course the Lugosi gem. Its a real blend of styles which kinda works and kinda doesn't. Naturally the film is created with an old time appearance reminiscent of the 1931 film, but at the same time it has those great cheesy cardboard cutout visuals of Hammer horrors. I personally think the film has a lot in common with 'Spaceballs' in the fact that it looks hammy but at the same time it also has some neat effects. The main negative aspect of the film in my opinion was most of the sets are obviously sets which is a bit off putting I can't deny and there is a distinct lack of scenic spooky landscapes or creepy castles which is a real shame. I realise the film is suppose to be low rent as it were but all Dracula flicks need some nice eerie real locations and spooky castles. Despite that there are some nice touches here and there, the low budget bat transformations of Dracula are kinda cute, lots of little homages and visual gags, everything has been over done, forced and blown out of proportions on purpose which is amusing, costumes are suitably stuffy and set the mood well, plus the casting is actually quite good. Now I know you can't expect top rate acting in a Brooks spoof but there are still some nice little performances here. The best for me being MacNicol as the whimpering stir crazy Renfield. The character does get a bit too loony tunes as the film progresses but initially I really like his stiff upper lipped Englishman when he first travels to see Dracula. The best scene must be when Renfield sits down with Dr Seward for tea and ends up eating bugs. Not only that but the pronunciation of raspberries by Harvey korman in this sequence is hilarious. Even though he has top billing the late great Nielsen wasn't the best thing here (the combination of him and Brooks together in films came too late in the day unfortunately). Bottom line Nielsen is miscast as Dracula, he doesn't look the part and he doesn't sound the part, but that's why he is perfect in the role. The fact he's completely wrong for the role makes it work, its just funny that he doesn't come across as a Dracula kind of guy and I think Nielsen knows that and uses it. Whilst watching I can't help but think Leslie is actually trying in certain scenes bless him, he does appear to actually go for it and really put on his best Lugosi/Dracula performance just for the hell of it, he's enjoying his chance in the role. End of the day only Nielsen could get away with this kind of deliberate miscasting, he was (and still is) such a popular lovable guy. Brooks himself enters the fray as Van Helsing and fits the role pretty well with his mock German, Jewish accent. In a sense he's playing the same characters as President Skroob and Frederick Bronski with similar facial hair but not as dumb. Yeah sure we've seen it all before with Brooks but if you're a fan then you won't complain. His best scene must be the stake through the heart sequence, simple but effective. I do get the impression that Brooks is merely working his way through every genre he can and this film simply ticks a box on the list...pretty much like 'Men in Tights'. I also get the feeling he is trying to recapture the same level of success he achieved with 'Young Frankenstein' and the gothic horror genre. To be brutally honest most of the jokes have been used before in previous works but at least its not as childish as 'Men in Tights' and does offer some adult content. I won't say this parody is a great film, it doesn't really come close to previous Brooks films but its still mildly amusing and a must for fanboys.

Phil Hubbs
Phil Hubbs

Super Reviewer

Mel Brooks goes to the old Universal horror franchise and tries for another parody homage like Young Frankenstein, this time with the vampire branch of operations. Strangely though he only chooses unknown actresses for the female leads (except for an uncomfortable cameo by his wife lampooning the great Maria Ouspenkaya) which is a substantial break in the formula. So, while laff-out-loud funny in parts, in other places not so much = an uneven offering. The result is that Peter MacNicol as Renfield is the only one in the cast who seems to know he's in a Mel Brooks comedy. Harvey Korman does a good Brit accent but essentially has nothing to do the whole piece, has only one, count 'em, one joke. A tragic misfire, but not a total loss.

Kevin M. Williams
Kevin M. Williams

Super Reviewer

Marginally funny.

Christian C
Christian C

Super Reviewer

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