Hannah and Her Sisters

Critics Consensus

Smart, tender, and funny in equal measure, Hannah and Her Sisters is one of Woody Allen's finest films.

91%

TOMATOMETER

Reviews Counted: 56

90%
liked it

Audience Score

User Ratings: 31,017

TOMATOMETER

N/A
All Critics | Top Critics
Average Rating: N/A
Reviews Count: 0
Fresh: 0
Rotten: 0

AUDIENCE SCORE

90%
Average Rating: 3.9/5

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Movie Info

A Woody Allen Manhattan mosaic, Hannah and Her Sisters concerns the lives, loves, and infidelities among a tightly-knit artistic clan. Hannah (Mia Farrow) regularly meets with her sisters Holly (Dianne Wiest) and Lee (Barbara Hershey) to discuss the week's events. It's what they don't always tell each other that forms the film's various subplots. Hannah is married to accountant and financial planner Elliot (Michael Caine), who carries a torch for Lee, who in turn lives with pompous Soho artist Frederick (Max Von Sydow). Meanwhile, Holly, a neurotic actress and eternal loser in love, dates TV producer Mickey (Allen), who used to be married to Hannah and spends most of the film convinced that he's about to die. Appearing in supporting parts are Lloyd Nolan and Maureen O'Sullivan (Farrow's real mom), as the eternally bickering husband-and-wife acting team who are the parents of Hannah and her sisters. The film begins and ends during the family's traditional Thanksgiving dinner, filmed in Farrow's actual New York apartment. Unbilled cameos are contributed by Sam Waterston as one of Wiest's brief amours and Tony Roberts as one of Allen's friends. Hannah and Her Sisters collected Oscars for Michael Caine, Dianne Wiest, and Woody Allen's screenplay.

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Cast

Mia Farrow
as Hannah
Lloyd Nolan
as Hannah's father
Maureen O'Sullivan
as Hannah's Mother
Max von Sydow
as Frederick
The 39 Steps
as Rock Band
J.T. Walsh
as Ed Smythe
Allen DeCheser
as Hannah's Twin
Artie DeCheser
as Hannah's Twin
Ira Wheeler
as Dr. Abel
Richard Jenkins
as Dr. Wilkes
Tracy Kennedy
as Brunch Guest
Fred Melamed
as Dr. Grey
Benno Schmidt
as Dr. Smith
Maria Chiara
as Manon Lescaut
Bobby Short
as Himself
Rob Scott
as Drummer
Beverly Peer
as Bass Player
Daisy Previn
as Hannah's Child
Moses Farrow
as Hannah's Child
Paul Bates
as Theater Manager
Carrotte
as Theater Executive
Mary Pappas
as Theater Executive
Bernie Leighton
as Audition Pianist
Ken Costigan
as Father Flynn
Helen Miller
as Mickey's Mother
Leo Postrel
as Mickey's Father
William Sturgis
as Elliot's Analyst
Daniel Haber
as Krishna
John Doumanian
as Thanksgiving Guest
Fletcher Farrow Previn
as Thanksgiving Guest
Irwin Tenenbaum
as Thanksgiving Guest
Amy Greenhill
as Thanksgiving Guest
Dickson Shaw
as Thanksgiving Guest
Marje Sheridan
as Thanksgiving Guest
Ivan Kronenfeld
as Lee's Husband
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Critic Reviews for Hannah and Her Sisters

All Critics (56) | Top Critics (13)

Audience Reviews for Hannah and Her Sisters

What makes this film so special and unforgettable - right there with its flawless structure, impeccable direction, three-dimensional characters and phenomenal dialogue - is how Woody Allen is won over by such a surprising amount of optimism, and the result is just perfection.

Carlos Magalhães
Carlos Magalhães

Super Reviewer

½

The pastiche structure of this film is complex though sometimes unsatisfyingly slow. This dysfunctional literati family struggles with passive-aggressive sororal jealousy and spousal musical chairs. The titular character is the least developed. Hannah's acting talent and togetherness is only talked about through pervasive monologues; her strengths and demons are never really shown. Nice uncredited cameo from caterpillar-browed Sam Waterston from "The Newsroom"!

Alice Shen
Alice Shen

Super Reviewer

It's no Bananas, but really, what is?

Julie B
Julie B

Super Reviewer

Woody Allen skillfully blends comedy and drama in this wonderfully observed portrait of the lives, loves, and issues of a close knit family and their significant others over the course of a couple of years. Hannah (Mia Farrow) is the oldest child of artistic parents. She's a successful, kind, and thoughtful actress, wife, and mother. She's basically the backbone of the family, who both hate and need her. Her two sisters, Holly (Dianne Wiest) and Lee (Barabra Hershey) are more aimless and resent her because of her stable and successful life, yet the rely on her for support so much that they couldn't possibly truly hate her. However, Hannah begins to realize that she's just as lost as the rest of the world when her life starts to unravel due to sibling rivalry and betrayal. This movie has some really serious dramatic moments, but they are nicely balanced out by some terrifically funny stuff involving Woody's character- a hypochondriac in the TV industry who goes through existential and spiritual crises, There's humor with some of the other characters, but the bulk comes from Woody's Mickey. This film has it all: comedy, tragedy, pain, relief, laughs, and tears. It all works wonderfully and reeks of realism and experience. Simply put, this is some truly great writing. The performances are also just terrific. The three ladies playing sisters have a great rapport together, Woody is great as usual doing his trademark shtick, Michael Caine (who, along with Wiest snagged an Oscar for his work here) is quite good as the husband to won sister who has an affair with one of the other two. Showing up in some nice supporting roles are Carrie Fisher and Max von Sydow, both of whom, despite being supporters, do a good job. I also enjoyed seeing Daniel Stern make a brief appearance, as well as Julie Kavner, who I think pretty much stole the few scenes she was in. All in all, this is just an excellent study of human relations, and ranks pretty high as some of Allen's best work. In a way, this almost felt like light opera or super high art, only not as pretentious and more accessible. Even then this won't be for everyone, but if you give it a chance, there's bound to be something here for you to enjoy. Definitely give this one a go.

Chris Weber
Chris Weber

Super Reviewer

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