Hay Foot Reviews

  • Nov 28, 2008

    This short programmer falls second in the series about Sargeant Doubleday (William Tracy). If you're not expecting to be anything other than entertained, then the actors perform an admirable job of elevating basic B material by milking the comedic sequences. Doubleday is booksmart and can remember anything that he reads, but his know-it-all behavior coupled with his lack of shooting ability make him the target of two bullies, Sargeant Ames (Joe Sawyer) and Sargeant Cobb (Noah Beery, Jr.). William Tracy comes off as a comedic, boyish ingenue in the Dick Powell-mode minus any singing, and familiar faces like James Gleason fill the supporting cast. Joe Sawyer shows little fear in making his character look laugh-outloud comedically ridiculous. I was struck by how modern a presence Noah Beery, Jr. seems. I cannot find a credit for Doubleday's handsome dog, but even he brings on the laughs.

    This short programmer falls second in the series about Sargeant Doubleday (William Tracy). If you're not expecting to be anything other than entertained, then the actors perform an admirable job of elevating basic B material by milking the comedic sequences. Doubleday is booksmart and can remember anything that he reads, but his know-it-all behavior coupled with his lack of shooting ability make him the target of two bullies, Sargeant Ames (Joe Sawyer) and Sargeant Cobb (Noah Beery, Jr.). William Tracy comes off as a comedic, boyish ingenue in the Dick Powell-mode minus any singing, and familiar faces like James Gleason fill the supporting cast. Joe Sawyer shows little fear in making his character look laugh-outloud comedically ridiculous. I was struck by how modern a presence Noah Beery, Jr. seems. I cannot find a credit for Doubleday's handsome dog, but even he brings on the laughs.