I'm Going Home Reviews

  • May 28, 2018

    There's some eternal wisdom perceptible in this movie, wisdom of a man who has lived long enough to possess something to share it with the world, but I'm sure you have to watch this movie multiple times to fully comprehend this wisdom to benefit profoundly from it. It is a very thoughtful cinema.

    There's some eternal wisdom perceptible in this movie, wisdom of a man who has lived long enough to possess something to share it with the world, but I'm sure you have to watch this movie multiple times to fully comprehend this wisdom to benefit profoundly from it. It is a very thoughtful cinema.

  • Jun 11, 2012

    Heart-wrenchingly slow... I did not find it enjoyable to watch.

    Heart-wrenchingly slow... I did not find it enjoyable to watch.

  • Nov 05, 2011

    This movie might be slow (for some people), but the fact is this movie brings the whole lot more meaning of life after somebody we loved the most gone. This is story about Gilbert Valence. Portrayed by le plus magnifique et là (C)gendaire Michel Piccoli, is an aging but highly respected actor who has just lost his wife, daughter and her husband in a road accident. What's left for him is just his only grandson, who is the only reason he get through his days as he tries to live without his loved ones.

    This movie might be slow (for some people), but the fact is this movie brings the whole lot more meaning of life after somebody we loved the most gone. This is story about Gilbert Valence. Portrayed by le plus magnifique et là (C)gendaire Michel Piccoli, is an aging but highly respected actor who has just lost his wife, daughter and her husband in a road accident. What's left for him is just his only grandson, who is the only reason he get through his days as he tries to live without his loved ones.

  • May 29, 2011

    I'm Going Home spends the far majority of its run time tracking its central character--an aging theater actor--out and about or at work on the stage. Gifted and energetic, the man lives by routine--watching his grandson leave for school, enjoying a cup of coffee in his favorite cafe, or delivering memorized lines night after night for his current production. However, when the routine is threatened, Oliveira delivers a poignant finale about the limitations (self-imposed and otherwise) of aging.

    I'm Going Home spends the far majority of its run time tracking its central character--an aging theater actor--out and about or at work on the stage. Gifted and energetic, the man lives by routine--watching his grandson leave for school, enjoying a cup of coffee in his favorite cafe, or delivering memorized lines night after night for his current production. However, when the routine is threatened, Oliveira delivers a poignant finale about the limitations (self-imposed and otherwise) of aging.

  • Jan 17, 2011

    Nothing to say about it, really. It's Oliveira.

    Nothing to say about it, really. It's Oliveira.

  • Jun 05, 2010

    A very, very wonderful film that's extremely touching and engaging. Manoel de Oliveria (who is now 102 years of age and just released his latest film at Cannes) breaks so many storytelling rules it's not even funny and that's what made this movie so damn good. This tells the story of older actor Gilbert Valence, a thespian who has devoted his life to theater and Shakespeare. After one of his latest performances, he is informed by his agent that his wife, daughter, and son-in-law have been killed in a car accident. Instead of following the character to hear what has happened and to see his reaction, we stay on his fellow actors who discuss to happenings. Then, the character rushes back into the room and exits. Cut to some time later where he's living his life with his grandson Serge who he barely sees and his nanny/housekeeper. Gilbert has started a new play. This is where I feel Gilbert's emotions about what happened truly show through. He puts it all into the characters he plays. In this film, it's as if the inciting event doesn't incite shit. Awful things happen and life goes on. However, towards the end, Gilbert starts to crack. It's very beautiful, moving, and poignant. Michel Piccoli puts in a hell of a performance that's muted and perfect for the part. Search this out, friends. You won't regret it.

    A very, very wonderful film that's extremely touching and engaging. Manoel de Oliveria (who is now 102 years of age and just released his latest film at Cannes) breaks so many storytelling rules it's not even funny and that's what made this movie so damn good. This tells the story of older actor Gilbert Valence, a thespian who has devoted his life to theater and Shakespeare. After one of his latest performances, he is informed by his agent that his wife, daughter, and son-in-law have been killed in a car accident. Instead of following the character to hear what has happened and to see his reaction, we stay on his fellow actors who discuss to happenings. Then, the character rushes back into the room and exits. Cut to some time later where he's living his life with his grandson Serge who he barely sees and his nanny/housekeeper. Gilbert has started a new play. This is where I feel Gilbert's emotions about what happened truly show through. He puts it all into the characters he plays. In this film, it's as if the inciting event doesn't incite shit. Awful things happen and life goes on. However, towards the end, Gilbert starts to crack. It's very beautiful, moving, and poignant. Michel Piccoli puts in a hell of a performance that's muted and perfect for the part. Search this out, friends. You won't regret it.

  • Jan 17, 2010

    Manoel de Oliveira is the oldest living active filmmaker (over 107 years old and STILL WORKING!). It's high time I see one of his films. This is one of his more recent ones. It's a sweet comedy-drama about a stage actor who loses his wife, daughter and son-in-law in a tragic car accident and has to care for his 9 year old grandson. Sweet, quiet and poignant with a great performance by Michel Piccoli. The film does tend to drag a bit though.

    Manoel de Oliveira is the oldest living active filmmaker (over 107 years old and STILL WORKING!). It's high time I see one of his films. This is one of his more recent ones. It's a sweet comedy-drama about a stage actor who loses his wife, daughter and son-in-law in a tragic car accident and has to care for his 9 year old grandson. Sweet, quiet and poignant with a great performance by Michel Piccoli. The film does tend to drag a bit though.

  • Jul 14, 2009

    Pretentious twaddle. Piccoli great.

    Pretentious twaddle. Piccoli great.

  • Feb 05, 2009

    J' ai manqué le bateau sur celui-ci.

    J' ai manqué le bateau sur celui-ci.

  • Nov 17, 2008

    An unforgettable performance by Michel Piccoli in this touching de Oliveira film about getting old. I found it deeply emotional, but somehow clear, rational, "distant" and with a touch of humour - it reminded me of some Chabrol's movies. As in most of the director's work, it is filled with quotes from great literature, from Shakespeare to Joyce in this case, and through the interpretation of this work de Oliveira is able to speak at every single person in the world.

    An unforgettable performance by Michel Piccoli in this touching de Oliveira film about getting old. I found it deeply emotional, but somehow clear, rational, "distant" and with a touch of humour - it reminded me of some Chabrol's movies. As in most of the director's work, it is filled with quotes from great literature, from Shakespeare to Joyce in this case, and through the interpretation of this work de Oliveira is able to speak at every single person in the world.