Internal Affairs Reviews

  • Oct 06, 2020

    Wow this film is dark...a seemingly straight forward story went to some very lowly depths...I found the characters of Andy Garcia and Richard Gere very interesting...but in the end this movie was just too strange to rate any higher

    Wow this film is dark...a seemingly straight forward story went to some very lowly depths...I found the characters of Andy Garcia and Richard Gere very interesting...but in the end this movie was just too strange to rate any higher

  • Sep 29, 2020

    Disappointing ending, full justice was not done!

    Disappointing ending, full justice was not done!

  • Jul 11, 2020

    You have seen it before but it is well done.

    You have seen it before but it is well done.

  • May 08, 2020

    2 great performances from Gere and Garcia. Really entertaining.

    2 great performances from Gere and Garcia. Really entertaining.

  • Jan 13, 2020

    Internal affairs is the most important division in the Los Angeles police force The officers get the respect but one cop in particular decides to go deep with it Richard Gere is a cop Dennis Peck willing to do whatever it takes to bring down the baddies, Andy Garcia plays Raymond who's just joined the IA but a murder puts him and his wife at risk Van Stretch played by Billy Baldwin is Pecks partner but he's more chiseled considering he abuses drugs, uses excessive force, and physically abuses his wife with their children So Raymond and his partner Wallace played by Laurie Metcalf try to determine what course of action should be taken to keep Van Stretch in line Raymond and Peck aren't exactly the best buds when they meet so of course there's a lot of tension while this investigation is underway There's so much corruption and dirty politics involved given what lengths Peck goes to achieving his own ends It's pretty shocking seeing Gere play a villain for a change, nothing phases him and he continues to push particularly Raymond for sticking his nose where he shouldn't The tone of the film is disturbing, the music is very unsettling, Gere and Garcia make awesome polar opposing forces, and then ending is what you'd expect after so much turmoil that's taken place Sure it's underwhelming by the time the credits roll but this is a scary turn by Gere than we're used to seeing him

    Internal affairs is the most important division in the Los Angeles police force The officers get the respect but one cop in particular decides to go deep with it Richard Gere is a cop Dennis Peck willing to do whatever it takes to bring down the baddies, Andy Garcia plays Raymond who's just joined the IA but a murder puts him and his wife at risk Van Stretch played by Billy Baldwin is Pecks partner but he's more chiseled considering he abuses drugs, uses excessive force, and physically abuses his wife with their children So Raymond and his partner Wallace played by Laurie Metcalf try to determine what course of action should be taken to keep Van Stretch in line Raymond and Peck aren't exactly the best buds when they meet so of course there's a lot of tension while this investigation is underway There's so much corruption and dirty politics involved given what lengths Peck goes to achieving his own ends It's pretty shocking seeing Gere play a villain for a change, nothing phases him and he continues to push particularly Raymond for sticking his nose where he shouldn't The tone of the film is disturbing, the music is very unsettling, Gere and Garcia make awesome polar opposing forces, and then ending is what you'd expect after so much turmoil that's taken place Sure it's underwhelming by the time the credits roll but this is a scary turn by Gere than we're used to seeing him

  • Jan 11, 2020

    During a drug bust, LAPD patrolmen Dennis Peck (Richard Gere) and Van Stretch (William Baldwin) assault a dealer and his girlfriend. Outside, fellow patrolman Dorian Fletcher (Michael Beach) shoots a man running towards him, only to discover that he was unarmed. While Fletcher is distraught by the incident, Peck plants a knife on the body to get Fletcher off the hook. Soon afterwards, Raymond Avila (Andy Garcia) joins the LAPD's Internal Affairs Division (IAD) and is assigned to investigate the drug bust with partner Amy Wallace (Laurie Metcalf). The investigation reveals that Stretch abuses drugs, has a history of excessive force, uses racist language even during a formal questioning by IAD, and may be corrupt. Unbeknownst to Avila and Wallace at that point, Stretch is also abusive to his wife, who he suspects of infidelity, and has a deeply subservient friendship with Peck. Avila eventually begins to look into Peck, who is held up as a role model for the LAPD but is regarded with distaste by other officers over his brutal techniques and has a lifestyle (including paying spousal support for a string of ex-wives) that is hard to justify with a patrolman's salary alone. Avila unsuccessfully pressures Stretch to provide evidence against Peck in return for immunity from prosecution. Fletcher, who has gotten into an altercation with Peck, agrees to help Avila's investigation. Avila's marriage starts to wilt due to his increased obsession with the case, and Peck insinuates he will make advances on Avila's wife, Kathleen (Nancy Travis). When Stretch makes it known that he will testify, Peck (who is having an affair with Stretch's wife) resolves to have him murdered. During a routine patrol in Huntington Park, Stretch is shot through the chest in a hit staged by Peck. After Peck murders the hitman, he sees the blue van used in the hit speeding away, indicating a witness to the crime. When Stretch is revealed to be alive, Peck strangles him but makes it look as though he's holding a dead friend when his partners arrive. Avila and Wallace set up a sting to catch the witness, but two SWAT units arrive on the scene after the sting is leaked. Fletcher and the witness are killed in the resulting shootout. As he dies in Avila's arms, he identifies Peck as Stretch's killer... Mike Figgis "Internal Affairs" was the big comeback for Richard Gere in 1990 and this great intense dark thriller might not have a unique storyline, but two great characters going against eachother. Gere and Garcia are here what Pacino and De Niro was in "Heat" five years later. Gere is in great form as the corrupt psychopathic cop Dennis Peck and Garcia is on fire as the hotheaded Internal Affairs investigator Raymond Avilla. I love Nancy Travis and AnnaBella Sciorra. Richard Gere and Andy Garcia reportedly did not get along during filming. Some of the scenes in which they were required to hit each other, particularly the confrontation in the elevator, were allegedly for real. Garcia subsequently refused to attend the wrap party. And this goes through the screen for sure. "Internal Affairs" stands out due to great performances from Gere and Garcia.

    During a drug bust, LAPD patrolmen Dennis Peck (Richard Gere) and Van Stretch (William Baldwin) assault a dealer and his girlfriend. Outside, fellow patrolman Dorian Fletcher (Michael Beach) shoots a man running towards him, only to discover that he was unarmed. While Fletcher is distraught by the incident, Peck plants a knife on the body to get Fletcher off the hook. Soon afterwards, Raymond Avila (Andy Garcia) joins the LAPD's Internal Affairs Division (IAD) and is assigned to investigate the drug bust with partner Amy Wallace (Laurie Metcalf). The investigation reveals that Stretch abuses drugs, has a history of excessive force, uses racist language even during a formal questioning by IAD, and may be corrupt. Unbeknownst to Avila and Wallace at that point, Stretch is also abusive to his wife, who he suspects of infidelity, and has a deeply subservient friendship with Peck. Avila eventually begins to look into Peck, who is held up as a role model for the LAPD but is regarded with distaste by other officers over his brutal techniques and has a lifestyle (including paying spousal support for a string of ex-wives) that is hard to justify with a patrolman's salary alone. Avila unsuccessfully pressures Stretch to provide evidence against Peck in return for immunity from prosecution. Fletcher, who has gotten into an altercation with Peck, agrees to help Avila's investigation. Avila's marriage starts to wilt due to his increased obsession with the case, and Peck insinuates he will make advances on Avila's wife, Kathleen (Nancy Travis). When Stretch makes it known that he will testify, Peck (who is having an affair with Stretch's wife) resolves to have him murdered. During a routine patrol in Huntington Park, Stretch is shot through the chest in a hit staged by Peck. After Peck murders the hitman, he sees the blue van used in the hit speeding away, indicating a witness to the crime. When Stretch is revealed to be alive, Peck strangles him but makes it look as though he's holding a dead friend when his partners arrive. Avila and Wallace set up a sting to catch the witness, but two SWAT units arrive on the scene after the sting is leaked. Fletcher and the witness are killed in the resulting shootout. As he dies in Avila's arms, he identifies Peck as Stretch's killer... Mike Figgis "Internal Affairs" was the big comeback for Richard Gere in 1990 and this great intense dark thriller might not have a unique storyline, but two great characters going against eachother. Gere and Garcia are here what Pacino and De Niro was in "Heat" five years later. Gere is in great form as the corrupt psychopathic cop Dennis Peck and Garcia is on fire as the hotheaded Internal Affairs investigator Raymond Avilla. I love Nancy Travis and AnnaBella Sciorra. Richard Gere and Andy Garcia reportedly did not get along during filming. Some of the scenes in which they were required to hit each other, particularly the confrontation in the elevator, were allegedly for real. Garcia subsequently refused to attend the wrap party. And this goes through the screen for sure. "Internal Affairs" stands out due to great performances from Gere and Garcia.

  • Jul 14, 2019

    It started getting tedious and boringly predictable towards the end.

    It started getting tedious and boringly predictable towards the end.

  • Feb 12, 2019

    A good movie. Gere is good at playing a sub-human vermin creature.

    A good movie. Gere is good at playing a sub-human vermin creature.

  • Jan 10, 2019

    If you said some movie is perfect, this one deserves to be above them.

    If you said some movie is perfect, this one deserves to be above them.

  • Sep 28, 2017

    Easily one of the best Gere flicks, also of García's.

    Easily one of the best Gere flicks, also of García's.