Jewel Robbery Reviews

  • May 27, 2019

    Neat little movie, early on in the talking pictures era with Wm. Powell at his best, aided by lovely young Kay Francis as "the little rich girl' who falls for this jewel thief. Easy to watch and easy to enjoy. A flashy picture for its time period.

    Neat little movie, early on in the talking pictures era with Wm. Powell at his best, aided by lovely young Kay Francis as "the little rich girl' who falls for this jewel thief. Easy to watch and easy to enjoy. A flashy picture for its time period.

  • Antonius B Super Reviewer
    Oct 29, 2018

    This film is entertaining enough and has its moments. Kay Francis plays a rich woman who enjoys being pampered by her servants and expensive jewelry from her husband. While she's at a jewelers picking up her latest bauble (a 28 carat diamond ring), William Powell strolls in with his crew to lead a very leisurely, dignified robbery. Naturally, the pair make goo-goo eyes at each other, and she's happy when he's not caught. One of the amusing little pre-code laughs is Powell doling out marijuana cigarettes, not referred to by name, but which after a few puffs leave those partaking to get quite silly (and Powell warning that they'll be hungry afterwards). There's also a fair bit of playful innuendo mixed in, one example of which is her friend telling her of a robbery in which a woman was "stripped right down to her teddies," and that if it happened to her, she would "let the train go on," because "When I'm travelling at the rate of 80 miles per hour, I'm not responsible for my actions." It's made clear that Francis has just broken off one affair, and she says she leads a boring, shallow life in which her schedule is "In the morning a cocktail. In the afternoon a man." And Powell all but propositions Francis when he wants to hide out in her bedroom for an evening, saying that in the morning they'll have a "secret behind them." It's all very light though, and while director William Dieterle creates a near Lubitschean feel in the playfulness of it all, there's something a bit awkward and off in the film's pacing, and the dynamic between Powell and Francis. They're certainly better together in 'One Way Passage' from the same year, but this one's passable.

    This film is entertaining enough and has its moments. Kay Francis plays a rich woman who enjoys being pampered by her servants and expensive jewelry from her husband. While she's at a jewelers picking up her latest bauble (a 28 carat diamond ring), William Powell strolls in with his crew to lead a very leisurely, dignified robbery. Naturally, the pair make goo-goo eyes at each other, and she's happy when he's not caught. One of the amusing little pre-code laughs is Powell doling out marijuana cigarettes, not referred to by name, but which after a few puffs leave those partaking to get quite silly (and Powell warning that they'll be hungry afterwards). There's also a fair bit of playful innuendo mixed in, one example of which is her friend telling her of a robbery in which a woman was "stripped right down to her teddies," and that if it happened to her, she would "let the train go on," because "When I'm travelling at the rate of 80 miles per hour, I'm not responsible for my actions." It's made clear that Francis has just broken off one affair, and she says she leads a boring, shallow life in which her schedule is "In the morning a cocktail. In the afternoon a man." And Powell all but propositions Francis when he wants to hide out in her bedroom for an evening, saying that in the morning they'll have a "secret behind them." It's all very light though, and while director William Dieterle creates a near Lubitschean feel in the playfulness of it all, there's something a bit awkward and off in the film's pacing, and the dynamic between Powell and Francis. They're certainly better together in 'One Way Passage' from the same year, but this one's passable.

  • Dec 17, 2014

    Jewel Robbery is a decent film. It is about a gentleman thief charms a Viennese baron's wife and also conducts a daring daylight robbery of a jewellers. William Powell and Kay Francis give good performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. William Dieterle did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the romance and mystery.

    Jewel Robbery is a decent film. It is about a gentleman thief charms a Viennese baron's wife and also conducts a daring daylight robbery of a jewellers. William Powell and Kay Francis give good performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. William Dieterle did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the romance and mystery.

  • Nov 14, 2014

    A bored Baroness discovers love & excitement when she gets seduced by a gallant jewel thief. This is one of the raciest films of the 1930's... And you thought old movies were stuffy--Stylish, zesty, sassy, and fun...pure high entertainment... A Viennese Bonbon!!

    A bored Baroness discovers love & excitement when she gets seduced by a gallant jewel thief. This is one of the raciest films of the 1930's... And you thought old movies were stuffy--Stylish, zesty, sassy, and fun...pure high entertainment... A Viennese Bonbon!!

  • Aug 30, 2014

    A simple little film that moves fast & has some good little twists & turns. A solid early 1930's from Warner Bros. The story of charismatic Jewel Thief pulling off an incredible heist at Vienna's most renown Jewellery Store. Some of the acting is irritable but at screen length of 68 mins it packs a nice tight story. The are some extraordinary pieces of jewellery on screen that are shot to perfection in crisp B&W...

    A simple little film that moves fast & has some good little twists & turns. A solid early 1930's from Warner Bros. The story of charismatic Jewel Thief pulling off an incredible heist at Vienna's most renown Jewellery Store. Some of the acting is irritable but at screen length of 68 mins it packs a nice tight story. The are some extraordinary pieces of jewellery on screen that are shot to perfection in crisp B&W...

  • Jun 16, 2014

    "I've never seen you before." "That is why I'm presenting my credentials. I had been guarding the National Bank." "That's not such a fine recommendation." "My contract said I was to watch out for burglars, not directors." "You use what weapons you can to get money: against a rich man, a revolver; against a poor one, his poverty." "No bankruptcy lawyer ever cleared out a place more tidily." "None of you should find it difficult to be calm with my revolver pointed at you." "I don't fancy your method of buying the authorities." "That's a lie!" "Come now, Baron, we know that you bankers keep governments in your waistcoat pockets." "You're a communist!" "No, I'm not a communist. [....] No, the present order of society is entirely satisfactory to me. You think I should do as well for myself under communism? What should I steal? Power plants? Grain elevators?" "International finance takes brains. [....] If you're so clever why not come 'round to my office some day and I'll try you out." "I couldn't take that chance. You're a banker. You might not be honest with me." "Well then come with me, I'll drop you somewhere in the suburbs, untouched." "Untouched in the suburbs?! Oh no! No, that doesn't intrigue me at all!"

    "I've never seen you before." "That is why I'm presenting my credentials. I had been guarding the National Bank." "That's not such a fine recommendation." "My contract said I was to watch out for burglars, not directors." "You use what weapons you can to get money: against a rich man, a revolver; against a poor one, his poverty." "No bankruptcy lawyer ever cleared out a place more tidily." "None of you should find it difficult to be calm with my revolver pointed at you." "I don't fancy your method of buying the authorities." "That's a lie!" "Come now, Baron, we know that you bankers keep governments in your waistcoat pockets." "You're a communist!" "No, I'm not a communist. [....] No, the present order of society is entirely satisfactory to me. You think I should do as well for myself under communism? What should I steal? Power plants? Grain elevators?" "International finance takes brains. [....] If you're so clever why not come 'round to my office some day and I'll try you out." "I couldn't take that chance. You're a banker. You might not be honest with me." "Well then come with me, I'll drop you somewhere in the suburbs, untouched." "Untouched in the suburbs?! Oh no! No, that doesn't intrigue me at all!"

  • Apr 01, 2014

    Jewel Robbery (1932) William Powell is his handsome, debonaire self as a jewell thief who has a way with people, with the help of those marijuana cigarettes. ;-) Kay Francis (fresh from their "One Way Passage" movie) is back as the bored Baroness Teri von Hornhenfels on the make, who is infatuated with this bad boy. This Hayes Office pre-code movie shows off a hedonistic Vienna along the same lines as the Ernst Lubitsch comedies. All the idle rich married people are sleeping around in their evening gowns. I wonder how the depression era movie-goers liked this? I enjoyed watching it, even without top hat and tails. Baroness Teri is delightfully sexy, sneaking away from rich hubby, Baron Franz (Henry Kolker) to have fun with anybody who can keep her entertained. If you're a Kay Francis fan, you're going to love her in this. Powell's jewell thief is more a lovable rogue than a dangerous criminal, saying that he's apposed to the American school of banditry, although he is there to clean out every jewelry store he can get into, and especially in the Baroness's bedroom. The writing is great. There's plenty of double entendres and some things that are plenty blatant for adults to enjoy. If you get a chance to see this, please do.

    Jewel Robbery (1932) William Powell is his handsome, debonaire self as a jewell thief who has a way with people, with the help of those marijuana cigarettes. ;-) Kay Francis (fresh from their "One Way Passage" movie) is back as the bored Baroness Teri von Hornhenfels on the make, who is infatuated with this bad boy. This Hayes Office pre-code movie shows off a hedonistic Vienna along the same lines as the Ernst Lubitsch comedies. All the idle rich married people are sleeping around in their evening gowns. I wonder how the depression era movie-goers liked this? I enjoyed watching it, even without top hat and tails. Baroness Teri is delightfully sexy, sneaking away from rich hubby, Baron Franz (Henry Kolker) to have fun with anybody who can keep her entertained. If you're a Kay Francis fan, you're going to love her in this. Powell's jewell thief is more a lovable rogue than a dangerous criminal, saying that he's apposed to the American school of banditry, although he is there to clean out every jewelry store he can get into, and especially in the Baroness's bedroom. The writing is great. There's plenty of double entendres and some things that are plenty blatant for adults to enjoy. If you get a chance to see this, please do.

  • Sep 30, 2013

    Totally not as good as Trouble in Paradise, but more pre-Code, if you know what I mean: bubble baths, backless outfits, "cigarette" smoking, extramarital affairs, and charming gentlemen robbers. And Kay Francis! And William Powell! If that means something to you, this is a must-see.

    Totally not as good as Trouble in Paradise, but more pre-Code, if you know what I mean: bubble baths, backless outfits, "cigarette" smoking, extramarital affairs, and charming gentlemen robbers. And Kay Francis! And William Powell! If that means something to you, this is a must-see.

  • May 05, 2013

    Simply splendid! Gotta love those cigarettes!

    Simply splendid! Gotta love those cigarettes!

  • Aug 21, 2012

    It was cute. Its not as comedic as I had expected but it was still well done. I did quite enjoy the magic cigarettes lol. Never would have thought that a movie from the 30`s would be showing people getting high. This was quite a clever ploy though in order for the robber to escape unscathed.....getting the policeman and houseguests high.

    It was cute. Its not as comedic as I had expected but it was still well done. I did quite enjoy the magic cigarettes lol. Never would have thought that a movie from the 30`s would be showing people getting high. This was quite a clever ploy though in order for the robber to escape unscathed.....getting the policeman and houseguests high.