The Landlord Reviews

  • Apr 09, 2019

    this is an OK film but not really the sort of thing i go crazy for

    this is an OK film but not really the sort of thing i go crazy for

  • Feb 01, 2019

    The best comedy movie ever made!

    The best comedy movie ever made!

  • Aug 31, 2017

    Black Comedy with an Abstract 60's Painting of White Guilt. I adore Beau though.

    Black Comedy with an Abstract 60's Painting of White Guilt. I adore Beau though.

  • Nov 26, 2014

    Groundbreaking and timeless romance exploring issues of racism and class privilege. From the director of Harold and Maude Hal Ashby.

    Groundbreaking and timeless romance exploring issues of racism and class privilege. From the director of Harold and Maude Hal Ashby.

  • Oct 05, 2014

    Scattershot, bizarre, but at times brilliant, inter-racial comedy of sorts. The visual style and editing is really distinctive and Hal Ashby here found his groove immediately on this striking, debut film.

    Scattershot, bizarre, but at times brilliant, inter-racial comedy of sorts. The visual style and editing is really distinctive and Hal Ashby here found his groove immediately on this striking, debut film.

  • Aug 04, 2014

    Unassuming but brilliant little comedy drama about an aimless rich kid, Beau Bridges, who decides to "run away from home" and busy an apartment building with the plan of evicting the tenants and renovating the building to suit his own liking. However, Bridges finds himself bonding with the racially, culturally and politically diverse tenants and things change. The film gets even more fun when Bridges' wealthy family is pulling into the apartment building and meeting his new acquaintances. The was director Hal Ashby's directorial debut and he does a fabulous job of populating a film of likable and entertaining characters, including Lee Grant as Bridges' mom, Pearl Bailey, Louis Gossett, Jr. and Hector Elizondo and building tenants and you can never go wrong with anything that Robert Klein does. Highly enjoyable and a film that I'd never even heard of until I listed to a Mark Maron podcast where Leonard Malton mentioned this as one of his favorite films of the 1970s. Luckily, TCM happened to be showing this film.

    Unassuming but brilliant little comedy drama about an aimless rich kid, Beau Bridges, who decides to "run away from home" and busy an apartment building with the plan of evicting the tenants and renovating the building to suit his own liking. However, Bridges finds himself bonding with the racially, culturally and politically diverse tenants and things change. The film gets even more fun when Bridges' wealthy family is pulling into the apartment building and meeting his new acquaintances. The was director Hal Ashby's directorial debut and he does a fabulous job of populating a film of likable and entertaining characters, including Lee Grant as Bridges' mom, Pearl Bailey, Louis Gossett, Jr. and Hector Elizondo and building tenants and you can never go wrong with anything that Robert Klein does. Highly enjoyable and a film that I'd never even heard of until I listed to a Mark Maron podcast where Leonard Malton mentioned this as one of his favorite films of the 1970s. Luckily, TCM happened to be showing this film.

  • Apr 25, 2014

    Hal Ashby's directorial debut. The studio didn't know quite what to do with it but it's well worth seeking out. You won't be sorry.

    Hal Ashby's directorial debut. The studio didn't know quite what to do with it but it's well worth seeking out. You won't be sorry.

  • Jul 19, 2013

    Beau Bridges stars as a spoiled rich kid who wants to renovate slum apartments for himself, that is until he meets the tenants. A winning debut from director Hal Ashby. A biting comedy-drama that says a lot more about race and race relations than the way too late "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner". Nice performances all around. May not be for every taste (especially those who are just used to today's movies) but those who find themselves attuned to it will find themselves rewarded.

    Beau Bridges stars as a spoiled rich kid who wants to renovate slum apartments for himself, that is until he meets the tenants. A winning debut from director Hal Ashby. A biting comedy-drama that says a lot more about race and race relations than the way too late "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner". Nice performances all around. May not be for every taste (especially those who are just used to today's movies) but those who find themselves attuned to it will find themselves rewarded.

  • Jun 01, 2013

    The Super was better.

    The Super was better.

  • Apr 09, 2013

    You look like a racist to me. You've got funny eyes. Elgar is a twenty-nine year old rich white kid who recently acquired a rental property in the ghetto. He serves as the landlord and initially plans to tear the property down and build a house; however, after getting to know the residents, he has some hesitancy to build his dream home. Will Elgar give in to peer pressure of his friends of family or keep the property as is? "You know what NAACP stands for? Nigers ain't always colored people." Hal Ashby, director of Harold and Maude, The Last Detail, Coming Home, Being There, Shampoo, and The Slugger's Wife, delivers The Land Lord. The storyline for this picture is entertaining and fun to watch unfold but not overly original or unique. The characters are fascinating and the script is fairly well written. The cast delivers fun performances and includes Beau Bridges, Lee Grant, Diana Sands, Louis Gossett, and Marki Bey. "I think you have a castration complex." I saw a preview for this film while flicking through the channels randomly and decided to give it a shot. I did find this movie entertaining and fun to watch unfold but some scenes were cheesy, some were interesting, and some were funny. This movie was worth watching once but I wouldn't say it was culture changing or worth watching in the classroom. "You lazy, no good, liberal." Grade: B-

    You look like a racist to me. You've got funny eyes. Elgar is a twenty-nine year old rich white kid who recently acquired a rental property in the ghetto. He serves as the landlord and initially plans to tear the property down and build a house; however, after getting to know the residents, he has some hesitancy to build his dream home. Will Elgar give in to peer pressure of his friends of family or keep the property as is? "You know what NAACP stands for? Nigers ain't always colored people." Hal Ashby, director of Harold and Maude, The Last Detail, Coming Home, Being There, Shampoo, and The Slugger's Wife, delivers The Land Lord. The storyline for this picture is entertaining and fun to watch unfold but not overly original or unique. The characters are fascinating and the script is fairly well written. The cast delivers fun performances and includes Beau Bridges, Lee Grant, Diana Sands, Louis Gossett, and Marki Bey. "I think you have a castration complex." I saw a preview for this film while flicking through the channels randomly and decided to give it a shot. I did find this movie entertaining and fun to watch unfold but some scenes were cheesy, some were interesting, and some were funny. This movie was worth watching once but I wouldn't say it was culture changing or worth watching in the classroom. "You lazy, no good, liberal." Grade: B-