Lost in America Reviews

  • Jun 14, 2020

    Great movie. Funny, fast-paced, still relevant today!

    Great movie. Funny, fast-paced, still relevant today!

  • Jun 10, 2020

    Swapping out hippies for yuppies, tie-dye for neckties, and Harley-Davidsons for a Winnebago—though based on Albert Brooks' frenetic performance, one expects they kept most of the cocaine—this is EASY RIDER for the Reagan era, with an emphasis on the uneasy easiness of bourgeois America.

    Swapping out hippies for yuppies, tie-dye for neckties, and Harley-Davidsons for a Winnebago—though based on Albert Brooks' frenetic performance, one expects they kept most of the cocaine—this is EASY RIDER for the Reagan era, with an emphasis on the uneasy easiness of bourgeois America.

  • Jun 03, 2020

    I'm a big fan of Albert Brooks and admire his comedy Style. Although this movie does have some decent moments I wouldn't say it's a comedy I would watch over and over. It's a bit tedious and long

    I'm a big fan of Albert Brooks and admire his comedy Style. Although this movie does have some decent moments I wouldn't say it's a comedy I would watch over and over. It's a bit tedious and long

  • Apr 08, 2020

    Even though it’s slow in some parts, there are scenes of comedic genius are so potent that they go down as classic. And, there’s enough of them to get a laugh throughout the whole film. Best line, the guy from the Temp Agency, “Oh, I’m sorry let me just get my list of $100,000 jobs.”

    Even though it’s slow in some parts, there are scenes of comedic genius are so potent that they go down as classic. And, there’s enough of them to get a laugh throughout the whole film. Best line, the guy from the Temp Agency, “Oh, I’m sorry let me just get my list of $100,000 jobs.”

  • Mar 16, 2020

    Albert Brooks stars and directs along with Julie Hagerty they play a married couple both striving for change from their usual lifestyle; the husband, David is dying for a promotion at his ad agency, the wife, Linda hopes to move into a new house not having to do retail anymore problem is he doesn't get the job and ultimately gets fired scolding at his boss so the new plan now is to 'get lost' in the beauty of America during a road trip while driving in an RV they have no destination in mind, not a care in the world, no giant goals to think about Freaking love Albert Brooks and Julie Hagerty. Clever satire of the American dream dropping all worries and responsibilities. Could've used more destination hopping but the epilogue was quite funny. Lots of us want to see the true face of what the nation's made us being so confined and suffocated in our daily routines but there's always a chance to start over and go beyond it all.

    Albert Brooks stars and directs along with Julie Hagerty they play a married couple both striving for change from their usual lifestyle; the husband, David is dying for a promotion at his ad agency, the wife, Linda hopes to move into a new house not having to do retail anymore problem is he doesn't get the job and ultimately gets fired scolding at his boss so the new plan now is to 'get lost' in the beauty of America during a road trip while driving in an RV they have no destination in mind, not a care in the world, no giant goals to think about Freaking love Albert Brooks and Julie Hagerty. Clever satire of the American dream dropping all worries and responsibilities. Could've used more destination hopping but the epilogue was quite funny. Lots of us want to see the true face of what the nation's made us being so confined and suffocated in our daily routines but there's always a chance to start over and go beyond it all.

  • Feb 01, 2019

    The best comedy movie ever made!

    The best comedy movie ever made!

  • Jan 31, 2019

    Doesn't hold up to modern comedy standards. Drags on. This is an example of a film that would do better as a featurette.

    Doesn't hold up to modern comedy standards. Drags on. This is an example of a film that would do better as a featurette.

  • Sep 16, 2018

    Albert Brooks is one of the most irritating actors around. We rented this movie to watch with a group of friends and none of us could stand it for more than 15 minutes. We should’ve guessed that it was going to be downhill from the minute he was whining in bed to his wife about how they shouldn’t have bought their house.

    Albert Brooks is one of the most irritating actors around. We rented this movie to watch with a group of friends and none of us could stand it for more than 15 minutes. We should’ve guessed that it was going to be downhill from the minute he was whining in bed to his wife about how they shouldn’t have bought their house.

  • Aug 22, 2017

    97% Tomatoes? What's the big deal with this snoozer from the Reagan era? You'll need to be a huge Albert Brooks fan to find funny in this very average road/buddy (wife, in this case) movie. And who's an Albert Brooks fan? Goofy from one end to the mercifully short other (at 1:30 in length). | - Norm de Guerre

    97% Tomatoes? What's the big deal with this snoozer from the Reagan era? You'll need to be a huge Albert Brooks fan to find funny in this very average road/buddy (wife, in this case) movie. And who's an Albert Brooks fan? Goofy from one end to the mercifully short other (at 1:30 in length). | - Norm de Guerre

  • Aug 07, 2017

    Albert Brooks excels at using the neurotic and pathetic rant for comedic purposes. It's the comedy of pain, I guess - not slapstick but emotional pain. And it's all the more excruciating because the character Brooks plays almost always brings the pain on himself through his own actions. Except in Lost in America, Julie Hagerty, playing his wife, also contributes to the pain (and Brooks can't handle it). The film basically moves from comedic set-piece - a social interaction gone so wrong (forcing your boss to fire you), for example - to comedic set-piece, another social interaction gone wrong (e.g., punched in the face by a murderous ex-convict - funnier than it sounds). You watch these interactions unfold and they keep going until you almost can't stand it anymore (but Brooks doesn't know when to stop). But, oh yes, the plot: Brooks loses his job as a highly-paid advertising executive and, with his wife, decides to drop out of society a la Easy Rider (to the strains of "Born to be Wild"). Being yuppies they cash in all their assets, buy a giant RV, and set off to find themselves and the real America. But first they hit Las Vegas to get re-married and it all goes downhill from there. Director Garry Marshall has a great cameo as a casino boss. Music and editing are used expertly to keep things perfectly paced (and also to bring on the laughs) across a swift 90 minutes shot mostly on location. If only Brooks would return to making films like this.

    Albert Brooks excels at using the neurotic and pathetic rant for comedic purposes. It's the comedy of pain, I guess - not slapstick but emotional pain. And it's all the more excruciating because the character Brooks plays almost always brings the pain on himself through his own actions. Except in Lost in America, Julie Hagerty, playing his wife, also contributes to the pain (and Brooks can't handle it). The film basically moves from comedic set-piece - a social interaction gone so wrong (forcing your boss to fire you), for example - to comedic set-piece, another social interaction gone wrong (e.g., punched in the face by a murderous ex-convict - funnier than it sounds). You watch these interactions unfold and they keep going until you almost can't stand it anymore (but Brooks doesn't know when to stop). But, oh yes, the plot: Brooks loses his job as a highly-paid advertising executive and, with his wife, decides to drop out of society a la Easy Rider (to the strains of "Born to be Wild"). Being yuppies they cash in all their assets, buy a giant RV, and set off to find themselves and the real America. But first they hit Las Vegas to get re-married and it all goes downhill from there. Director Garry Marshall has a great cameo as a casino boss. Music and editing are used expertly to keep things perfectly paced (and also to bring on the laughs) across a swift 90 minutes shot mostly on location. If only Brooks would return to making films like this.