Madadayo Reviews

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    Kyle M Super Reviewer
    Jun 17, 2016

    3.5-4. A nice little serene film. Very likable despite its simple, rather eventless plot. I liked it and everything in it is good, but I ultimately did not find it as moving or engaging as 'Rhapsody in August.'

    3.5-4. A nice little serene film. Very likable despite its simple, rather eventless plot. I liked it and everything in it is good, but I ultimately did not find it as moving or engaging as 'Rhapsody in August.'

  • Sep 25, 2014

    Enjoyable as a series of rambling comic monologues by the Sensei, though by the halfway point the absurd amount of hero-worshipping started to get on my nerves (the moustache-twirler who tried to buy the block of land was one big eye-roll). It's nice as the sentimental final film of a very old man, but if someone else had made this movie I don't think anybody would have even noticed it existed.

    Enjoyable as a series of rambling comic monologues by the Sensei, though by the halfway point the absurd amount of hero-worshipping started to get on my nerves (the moustache-twirler who tried to buy the block of land was one big eye-roll). It's nice as the sentimental final film of a very old man, but if someone else had made this movie I don't think anybody would have even noticed it existed.

  • Jun 09, 2013

    Tatsuo Matsumura's work in "Madadayo" is one of the greatest performances of any Akira Kurosawa actor; he plays the real life professor Hyakken Uchida before, during and after World War II. The story doesn't concern war, but the love and relation former students have with their professor. This is one of Kurosawa's most tender pictures, it shows us how and why former students are so keen on helping the professor in old age; Uchida is an instructor of German, but rarely is the subject referred to, the film rather showcases what kind of man he is which includes his love for a cat, how he and his wife have to move to a different home, how everyone respects him so much and his modest nature which incorporates tremendous wit and self-deprecating humor. I have seen "Kagemusha" and "Dreams," but this film in particular made me realize he has one of the most memorable dream sequences (there is only one in "Madadayo") in cinema, still we don't really find him synonymous with dreams. Also, there are striking resemblances to the works of Ozu; this might be the most "Japanese" film Kurosawa has made and it was his last, including a ray of patriotism in some scenes which I found surprising. I wouldn't place it among his four or five great films but it's definitely a must watch!

    Tatsuo Matsumura's work in "Madadayo" is one of the greatest performances of any Akira Kurosawa actor; he plays the real life professor Hyakken Uchida before, during and after World War II. The story doesn't concern war, but the love and relation former students have with their professor. This is one of Kurosawa's most tender pictures, it shows us how and why former students are so keen on helping the professor in old age; Uchida is an instructor of German, but rarely is the subject referred to, the film rather showcases what kind of man he is which includes his love for a cat, how he and his wife have to move to a different home, how everyone respects him so much and his modest nature which incorporates tremendous wit and self-deprecating humor. I have seen "Kagemusha" and "Dreams," but this film in particular made me realize he has one of the most memorable dream sequences (there is only one in "Madadayo") in cinema, still we don't really find him synonymous with dreams. Also, there are striking resemblances to the works of Ozu; this might be the most "Japanese" film Kurosawa has made and it was his last, including a ray of patriotism in some scenes which I found surprising. I wouldn't place it among his four or five great films but it's definitely a must watch!

  • Jan 05, 2013

    Could have benefitted from a little editing.

    Could have benefitted from a little editing.

  • Dec 24, 2012

    This is the motto this world.

    This is the motto this world.

  • Dec 22, 2012

    sans the overstretched nora episode this movie is pure gold as its protagonist

    sans the overstretched nora episode this movie is pure gold as its protagonist

  • Jun 14, 2012

    Nice film... fun to watch, funny and sad.....

    Nice film... fun to watch, funny and sad.....

  • G S Super Reviewer
    Dec 26, 2011

    The perfect last film for Kurosawa to make in my mind. The professor never seems to shrink away from living his life despite his age and not really having any solid goals to fulfill in retirement. The main character is absolutely endearing because he never runs out of funny things to say and is amiably eccentric. The film suffers from being a bit overlong, a little too much group singing to transition to different points, and is somewhat sentimentalized at points. These faults that would've made another directors film unbearable are but mere blemishes on this film. The 60th birthday party for the professor is a terrific and fun sequence which shows such great camaraderie between all the students and the professor. The missing cat subplot was hard to get into because it was difficult to relate to the importance of the cat despite the film's attempts to explain the significance of the cat to the professor. The film did succeed in showing that the professor was indeed deeply invested in the cat emotionally. This film is great because it illustrated for me the pleasure in friendship and the importance of allowing yourself to enjoy life without trying to force anything.

    The perfect last film for Kurosawa to make in my mind. The professor never seems to shrink away from living his life despite his age and not really having any solid goals to fulfill in retirement. The main character is absolutely endearing because he never runs out of funny things to say and is amiably eccentric. The film suffers from being a bit overlong, a little too much group singing to transition to different points, and is somewhat sentimentalized at points. These faults that would've made another directors film unbearable are but mere blemishes on this film. The 60th birthday party for the professor is a terrific and fun sequence which shows such great camaraderie between all the students and the professor. The missing cat subplot was hard to get into because it was difficult to relate to the importance of the cat despite the film's attempts to explain the significance of the cat to the professor. The film did succeed in showing that the professor was indeed deeply invested in the cat emotionally. This film is great because it illustrated for me the pleasure in friendship and the importance of allowing yourself to enjoy life without trying to force anything.

  • Dec 13, 2011

    seems like Kurosawa wanted to send his same message even in his last movie. it looks old, in a good way. indeed, a very ironic theme for a swan song.

    seems like Kurosawa wanted to send his same message even in his last movie. it looks old, in a good way. indeed, a very ironic theme for a swan song.

  • Aug 28, 2011

    Kurosawa's film about a teacher, slightly sentimental, slightly foolish, slightly childish, and with lots of delicate humour, who survives through the history's storms and is supported by his former admiring student.

    Kurosawa's film about a teacher, slightly sentimental, slightly foolish, slightly childish, and with lots of delicate humour, who survives through the history's storms and is supported by his former admiring student.