A Man Called Horse Reviews

  • May 30, 2020

    Movie have draw - see man tortured. Blobbo see at show then forget. (Now, want forget again.)

    Movie have draw - see man tortured. Blobbo see at show then forget. (Now, want forget again.)

  • Apr 28, 2020

    The late Richard Harris stars in a movie we've all become familiar with  A more civilized being is captured by local natives and then treated like less than a man  The tribes here consist of the Sioux Indians in 1825 with John Morgan being the last hunter in their territory after everyone else is taken out  He also befriends a fellow prisoner named Batise, they both make an exchange to help one another escape  It isn't until later they start to understand Morgan's just a man and begins to assimilate into their culture  Not only that but he falls in love with a female member of the tribe, a matriarchy of sorts Morgan is determined to be a chief which of course leads to a very infamous ritual scene where he must scar his body as well as be accustomed to the pain for the rite of passage  Morgan also wants little to do with his British aristocratic ways after learning so much with the indigenous peoples even facing a warring tribe shifts his views entirely if these people are to to continue  Again this film is along the lines of ‘Dances with Wolves', ‘Last Samurai', and ‘Pocahontas' but it keeps the viewer engaged with its richness in cinematography, the action scenes, and the powerhouse performance of Harris a different kind of Western without the usual gunfights, bar scenes, or cookie cutter bad guys you're used to seeing plus there's good looking at the human condition as well as going on a spiritual journey of your own the viewer definitely grows to like this tribe as much as Morgan because they just want to be understood and show they have a place to belong among other men a movie that's now 50 years old yet is carried tremendously by the late actor Harris next to the Sioux Indians whom are painted as respectfully as can be

    The late Richard Harris stars in a movie we've all become familiar with  A more civilized being is captured by local natives and then treated like less than a man  The tribes here consist of the Sioux Indians in 1825 with John Morgan being the last hunter in their territory after everyone else is taken out  He also befriends a fellow prisoner named Batise, they both make an exchange to help one another escape  It isn't until later they start to understand Morgan's just a man and begins to assimilate into their culture  Not only that but he falls in love with a female member of the tribe, a matriarchy of sorts Morgan is determined to be a chief which of course leads to a very infamous ritual scene where he must scar his body as well as be accustomed to the pain for the rite of passage  Morgan also wants little to do with his British aristocratic ways after learning so much with the indigenous peoples even facing a warring tribe shifts his views entirely if these people are to to continue  Again this film is along the lines of ‘Dances with Wolves', ‘Last Samurai', and ‘Pocahontas' but it keeps the viewer engaged with its richness in cinematography, the action scenes, and the powerhouse performance of Harris a different kind of Western without the usual gunfights, bar scenes, or cookie cutter bad guys you're used to seeing plus there's good looking at the human condition as well as going on a spiritual journey of your own the viewer definitely grows to like this tribe as much as Morgan because they just want to be understood and show they have a place to belong among other men a movie that's now 50 years old yet is carried tremendously by the late actor Harris next to the Sioux Indians whom are painted as respectfully as can be

  • Oct 02, 2018

    Perfect for a rainy Sunday afternoon.

    Perfect for a rainy Sunday afternoon.

  • Jan 19, 2015

    good bio pic of sorts

    good bio pic of sorts

  • Jun 13, 2014

    An English lord who comes to the Wild West for sport is abducted and humbled. Only when he proves his worth does he earn his "freedom". The sun sacrifice was the most interesting aspect. But this is presented in a realistic way without subtitles. It is a little harsh, but still interesting.

    An English lord who comes to the Wild West for sport is abducted and humbled. Only when he proves his worth does he earn his "freedom". The sun sacrifice was the most interesting aspect. But this is presented in a realistic way without subtitles. It is a little harsh, but still interesting.

  • Mar 22, 2014

    This movie is one of the very best I've ever seen.

    This movie is one of the very best I've ever seen.

  • Jan 10, 2014

    I just saw this film, now 44 years after it's premiere. Perhaps for its time, it was a unique enough story: the good, smart and refined white man is attacked by brutish Indians. Over time, he overcomes the suffering at the hands of the noble savages and because of his bravery is accepted as a member of the tribe. Part of that bravery is enduring the pain of being pierced through the skin over his pectorals and being lifted up in some type of large lodge which would have been more suitable to the taste of the Wichitas than to the Sioux. Indeed, some Lakota is spoken, but the constant imploring of "Wakantanka" instead of to "Tunkashila" is not quite right. The headdresses are fancifully imagined and the gesticulations and grunts do not add to any authenticity. On a positive note, I thought Dame Judith Anderson's acting as the mother was actually quite good and, at times, humorous. Why the Shoshone were depicted as the enemy is really beyond me, but then what does real history have to do with this film? As for the lauded sundance in the film, it is a holy, sacred and spiritual ritual - indeed, the most holy of the seven Lakota rites. I would venture to say that using the sundance in this way in order to accept a person into the tribe because of his or her ability to withstand pain is utter nonsense. The "hunka" ceremony is the L/N/Dakota ritual for adoption. The sundance is about personal sacrifice for one's people and oneself. I find this rendering of the ceremony very belittling and it shows that the writers obviously didn't care enough about the Sioux (Lakota/Nakota/Dakota) people to actually find out what it is all about.

    I just saw this film, now 44 years after it's premiere. Perhaps for its time, it was a unique enough story: the good, smart and refined white man is attacked by brutish Indians. Over time, he overcomes the suffering at the hands of the noble savages and because of his bravery is accepted as a member of the tribe. Part of that bravery is enduring the pain of being pierced through the skin over his pectorals and being lifted up in some type of large lodge which would have been more suitable to the taste of the Wichitas than to the Sioux. Indeed, some Lakota is spoken, but the constant imploring of "Wakantanka" instead of to "Tunkashila" is not quite right. The headdresses are fancifully imagined and the gesticulations and grunts do not add to any authenticity. On a positive note, I thought Dame Judith Anderson's acting as the mother was actually quite good and, at times, humorous. Why the Shoshone were depicted as the enemy is really beyond me, but then what does real history have to do with this film? As for the lauded sundance in the film, it is a holy, sacred and spiritual ritual - indeed, the most holy of the seven Lakota rites. I would venture to say that using the sundance in this way in order to accept a person into the tribe because of his or her ability to withstand pain is utter nonsense. The "hunka" ceremony is the L/N/Dakota ritual for adoption. The sundance is about personal sacrifice for one's people and oneself. I find this rendering of the ceremony very belittling and it shows that the writers obviously didn't care enough about the Sioux (Lakota/Nakota/Dakota) people to actually find out what it is all about.

  • Apr 07, 2013

    Great story, fantastic stunts, super violent.

    Great story, fantastic stunts, super violent.

  • Jan 01, 2013

    My favorite of all Richard Harris movies. Another tear-jerker...but boy, I like them

    My favorite of all Richard Harris movies. Another tear-jerker...but boy, I like them

  • Dec 28, 2012

    I love this movie as a child, as well as Little Big Man and Soldier Blue. I haven't seen any of them in a very long while but will gladly expand my library to include them one day.

    I love this movie as a child, as well as Little Big Man and Soldier Blue. I haven't seen any of them in a very long while but will gladly expand my library to include them one day.