Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (1983) - Rotten Tomatoes

Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (1983)

Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (1983)

TOMATOMETER

——

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Monty Python's The Meaning of Life Photos

Movie Info

The Meaning of Life is without a doubt the most tasteless of the Monty Python feature films; it also happens to be one of the funniest. Life's questions are "answered" in a series of outrageous vignettes, beginning with a pre-credits sequence at a staid London insurance company which transforms before our eyes into a pirate ship. One of our favorite bits involve the National Health doctors who try to claim a healthy liver from a still-living donor, pointing out that there's nothing in his contract preventing this. And of course, there's the scene with the world's most voracious glutton, who brings the art of vomiting to new heights before his spectacular demise. Be warned: though hilarious, this may be the grossest bit of comedy filmmaking ever conceived (there aren't enough words in the world to describe it in detail!). Loyal Pythonites Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin star in The Meaning of Life and share writing responsibilities, while Jones is in the director's chair this time out. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi
Rating:
R
Genre:
Comedy , Musical & Performing Arts , Science Fiction & Fantasy
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:
Universal Pictures

Watch it now

Cast

Graham Chapman
as Chairman/Fish #1/Doctor/Harry Blackitt/Wymer/Hordern
John Cleese
as Fish #2/Dr. Spencer/Humphrey Williams/Sturridge/Ainsworth
Terry Gilliam
as Howard, Window Washer/Fish #4/Walters/Middle of the Film Announcer, Max, Private Walters, Donor, Third Fish
Eric Idle
as Gunther/Fish #3/Mr. Moore/Mrs. Blackitt/Watson/Blackitt
Terry Jones
as Bert/Fish #6/Mum/Priest/Biggs/Sergeant/Man with Bendy Arms
Michael Palin
as Window Washer/Harry/Fish #5/Mr. Pycroft/Dad/Chaplain/Carter
Carol Cleveland
as Beefeater Waitress/Wife of Guest 1/Leaf Mother/Leaf Daughter
Patricia Quinn
as Mrs. Williams
Judy Loe
as Nurse #1
Simon Jones
as Chadwick/Jeremy Portland-Smythe
Andrew MacLachlan
as Groom/Wycliff/Victim #1/Guest #3
Valerie Whittington
as Mrs. Moore
Mark Holmes
as Victim #2/Troll Waiter/Guest #2
Peter Lovstrom
as Brown's Son
George Silver
as Diner Eating Howard the Fish
Angela Mann
as Wife of Guest #2
Show More Cast

Critic Reviews for Monty Python's The Meaning of Life

All Critics (30)

Despite its obvious shortcomings, The Meaning of Life also happens to be devastatingly funny at times, hitting a few beats of silliness with traditional Python precision.

Full Review… | November 23, 2013
Blu-ray.com

The skits range from hilarious to humdrum.

Full Review… | November 6, 2013
Creative Loafing

It's a weird kind of fun.

Full Review… | October 9, 2013
Movie Chambers

Edgy Python schtick better for older viewers.

Full Review… | January 1, 2011
Common Sense Media

Perfect Python!

November 5, 2004
7M Pictures

Prime Monty Python, primo laughs.

October 15, 2004
Kansas City Kansan

Audience Reviews for Monty Python's The Meaning of Life

This was the last movie to feature all the original Python's together before the death of Graham Chapman, it was also the groups last movie altogether, there were no more after this unfortunately. Clearly the decision was also made to go back to their roots with this movie. The more coherent story angle that was used in their previous two films was jettisoned and their good old fashioned collection of surreal sketches was used as the main basis. The main big difference this time was the added bonus that the movie was in fact more of a musical number, albeit a more twisted dark musical of course ([i]South Park[/i] eat your heart out). Now when I say the movie goes back to their old routine of surreal sketches, they do...but the sketches aren't exactly the same as their old work. Oh no, in this movie the individual sketches are actually much longer and are almost micro movies within the movie, they have their own beginning, middle and end...almost. Of course the quality of these sketches is much greater, they are much more elaborate, more in depth and like I said, actually have mini plots, none of them are just throw away quickies. Being a big-ish movie things have to appear much smoother and slicker than their TV days (or since their first sketch movie 'And Now for Something Completely Different'), and it is. Like their previous two excellent historical comedies proved, the combined skills and talents of the troupe, gelled with a solid budget, and you have gold. From start to finish the film consists of reasonable sized skits, mostly original, although some ring a few bells, and some with pretty impressive musical song and dance numbers. Surprisingly there is little to no twisted animation from Gilliam, it kinda feels like there was supposed to be but they decided to turn them into live action sequences instead (my thoughts). Some of the smaller sketches certainly seem like they could of been animated, it felt very odd seeing a Python movie that didn't have their unique classic animations, a Python sketch movie that is. Its also quite stunning that the song and dance sequences are so good, you'd never expect it. The first big number we see is set in Yorkshire and has a distinct [i]Oliver Twist[/i] vibe to it in terms of visuals, choreography and the music, not to mention the actual size of the whole thing. That's not even the only dance number, there's another big one towards the finale, and another classic Eric Idle song in the middle too. The movie is actually chopped up into chapters, chapters based on our progression through life, birth, middle age and death being obvious. Naturally there are some more silly chapters snuck in which are clearly there just for a stupid laugh, live organ transplants? Each of these chapters tends to have one main little sketch/story that runs for its short length, but there are the odd brief quickfire moments in between which are purely independent from the main little story. For example, with birth the main story is about a Yorkshireman (Palin) and his wife (Jones) who can't stop having kids because their faith won't allow him to use a condom. So he decides to sell all his kids (he and his wife have about 50 kids) for scientific experiments. Middle age is mainly based around an innocent yet dumb American couple (Palin and Idle) on vacation, they go to a fancy restaurant and order a conversation (not food) from the waiter (Cleese). Death, as you might have guessed, is all about a group of stuffy British people having a bit of a do (with yet more Americans on holiday I might add), when Death turns up and takes them all to the afterlife. In between these chapters are a few sub-chapters that deal with things like growing up, war etc... Now these little sketches were always a mixed bag for me, some hit and some miss. The film initially starts off with a mock movie complete with its own credits, 'The Crimson Permanent Insurance'. Now this short introduction is a gem, absolutely brilliant and very dark. Its all about a group of elderly office clerks working for a major accounting firm, they are treated like slaves by the younger fitter suits. When one of them gets fired they revolt, kill all the young suits and then...errmmm...set sail as if the whole building was some kind of old galleon. They all dress like pirates using office equipment, run the building as if it were a ship and 'sail' to big cities and bring down their major finance corporations by attacking their skyscrapers, or 'boarding' them, and killing all the young suits within. It sounds completely insane, and it is, what do you expect from Monty Python. Thing is, its so well filmed, it looks great visually...effects wise, its imaginative and I believe could be an actual full length movie in its own right (think 'Pirates of the Caribbean'...with OAP's, and good). The same can't be said for all of the content of course, some is just weak and not particularly funny (the middle aged American couple) whilst other bits are just disturbing (again...live organ transplants?). But one such highlight that must be mentioned is of course Mr Creosote, the enormous fat bloke who goes into a restaurant and eats so much that he explodes in a shower of innards and bodily fluids. Its definitely a more adult movie from the Python troupe this time. Previous movies were always cheeky with the quick blink and you'll miss it bit of nudity perhaps, the odd swear word, the odd hint of gore etc...but mostly things were more suggested or simply sexual innuendos which the kids wouldn't understand. In this film there is quite a bit of blood on show, some profanity and a lot of nudity! Hell I remember watching some scenes with my parents and being really embarrassed, all the sexy girls running with their boobs out, or Cleese teaching his class sex education by actually having sex in front of them! Twas so awkward and naughty for the time. Yet seeing this at a young age (dad is a fan) and I do recall not understanding things, not getting the meanings. Watching now as an adult it is very different and opens up the film so much more, being able to understand all the dirty adult stuff, plus all the nudity is now so tame. Its not quite as good as I remember it to be frank, plus of course its dated pretty badly now. Its generally like all of the Python work, some of it is brilliantly funny, brilliantly written and brilliantly performed, whilst some of it just misses the target badly and would fall on flat ears. I do enjoy the film, it is engaging and it offers some nuggets of comedy gold without a doubt. I just kinda think at times it doesn't feel like a Python movie, it feels too slick, too flashy, you tend to expect the cheapness of the TV series or the earlier movies that just looked cheap. At times it feels like a compilation of clips from other movies, you half expect to see something from 'Time Bandits' pop up. Its a strong movie, I just feel it could of been better, it isn't a patch on the two movies they made before this, one featured a bloke named Arthur, the other a bloke named Brian.

Phil Hubbs
Phil Hubbs

Super Reviewer

Monty Python discusses life, from the sanctity of every sperm to the rudeness of the Grim Reaper, in a series of sketches. Unlike the team's story-based feature movies, this one resembles a big-budget episode of the TV show with R-rated jokes (including the infamously sickening exploding glutton); it's still an irreverent classic, though.

Greg S
Greg S

Super Reviewer

½

Humphrey: What's wrong with a kiss, boy? Hmm? Why not start her off with a nice kiss? You don't have to go leaping straight for the clitoris like a bull at a gate. Give her a kiss, boy.  "It took God six days to create the earth, and Monty Python just 90 minutes to screw it all up." The Meaning of Life is the first Monty Python film I have the pleasure of watching, so I can't put any emphasis on comparing this to any of the others. That may actually be a good thing because I've heard the others are better. Overall, The Meaning of Life is a funny movie from the opening short film through to the feature presentation starting with Part 1- The Miracle of Birth to the last part, Death. Now some parts were great and some were not so great.  There's definitely a weirdly intelligent humor level in all of this despite just how stupid and ridiculous it all is. The wacky imagination of these guys is something of a mystery to me, but come on; it's impossible to not say their geniuses. The humor at work here may be unflattering, at times gross, and at other times just obscene, but there's a level of genius, and not just comedic genius, in it all.  Some of my favorite scenes were the sex-ed class, the whole Miracle of Birth, part one and two, and the Death scenes. The Middle Age part was kind of lazy and the whole Autumn years thing had its moments, but wasn't particularly satisfying. The Meaning of Life is definitely worth a look. These guys are extremely funny and their jokes in this one work more often then they don't. And of course you get to find out the actual meaning of life at the end. It's pretty profound too, so give it a look.

Melvin White
Melvin White

Super Reviewer

Monty Python's The Meaning of Life Quotes

Discussion Forum

Discuss Monty Python's The Meaning of Life on our Movie forum!

News & Features