Murder by Television Reviews

  • Oct 04, 2012

    Dreadful post Dracula star vehicle for Bela Lugosi. Unengaging and little to hold interest. The one star is for Lugosi and particularly his closing lines which are majestically delivered.

    Dreadful post Dracula star vehicle for Bela Lugosi. Unengaging and little to hold interest. The one star is for Lugosi and particularly his closing lines which are majestically delivered.

  • Aj V Super Reviewer
    Sep 03, 2010

    Although the way the murder is committed is interesting, the rest of the movie isn't. It's short and gets to the end quick. Plus, it makes some silly plot twists.

    Although the way the murder is committed is interesting, the rest of the movie isn't. It's short and gets to the end quick. Plus, it makes some silly plot twists.

  • Apr 21, 2010

    Everyone at a 1935 party seems to have a scientific marvel that even today's world has not seen. Inventions like wireless TV that doesn't need wires or cameras or anything, a brain scanner that can tell a man's potential for murder and of course a F-ing DEATH RAY. And just to make it more dumbfounded a SECOND Bela Lugosi shows up at the party equipped with the same undecipherable accent. GAH

    Everyone at a 1935 party seems to have a scientific marvel that even today's world has not seen. Inventions like wireless TV that doesn't need wires or cameras or anything, a brain scanner that can tell a man's potential for murder and of course a F-ing DEATH RAY. And just to make it more dumbfounded a SECOND Bela Lugosi shows up at the party equipped with the same undecipherable accent. GAH

  • Mar 25, 2010

    A death ray? Really?

    A death ray? Really?

  • Nov 09, 2009

    From a historical standpoint it?s a fascinating curio, as a story however, it is lacking. Very low budget, fair acting but it did hold my interest.

    From a historical standpoint it?s a fascinating curio, as a story however, it is lacking. Very low budget, fair acting but it did hold my interest.

  • Nov 09, 2009

    From a historical standpoint it’s a fascinating curio, as a story however, it is lacking. Very low budget, fair acting but it did hold my interest.

    From a historical standpoint it’s a fascinating curio, as a story however, it is lacking. Very low budget, fair acting but it did hold my interest.

  • Jan 16, 2006

    Murder By Television (aka The Houghland Murder Case) Starring: Bela Lugosi, Charles Hill Mailes, and Huntley Gordon Director: Clifford Sanforth In the mid-30s, the promise of television had captivated the imagination of Americans. Experimental broadcasts were being conducted, and science fiction and fantasy writers of all stripes were inventing all sorts of adventures about the wonders and dangers that this amazing new media would present. And that brings us to "Murder By Television", the second out-of-time techno-thriller I've watched that uses the fantastic new medium of televison as its jumping-off point. Sadly, this one isn't anywhere near as good as "Trapped By Television" ([URL=http://www.rottentomatoes.com/vine/journal_view.php?journalid=245672&entryid=248618&view=public]reviewed here[/URL]), despite a promising premise and the presence of some noted mystery/sci-fi genre players. In "Murder By Television", independently wealthy, eccentric, and independent-minded inventor James Houghland (Mailes) has created the perfect television broadcast system. Every corporation that has has been working to commercialize the new technology, and an array of governments ranging from the United States to certain sinister foreign powers want to have control of Houghland's wondrous invention, but he has rebuffed them all. The air is thick with plots and schemes as Houghland gathers friends and fellow inventors--among them criminologist and medical pioneer Dr. Scofield (Gordon)--demonstrates the power of his creation by receiving and rebroadcasting images from around the world, without the use of broadcast towers. His triumphant demonstration is cut short, however, as he is murdered during his live broadcast, for all viewers to see. It seems one of the many factions trying to get their hands on the invention deciced to end the compeition by eliminating the prize. As a police commissioner who had been among Houghland's guests investigates the murder--which is made all the more mysterious by the fact that Houghland simply dropped dead--all suspicion stars to fall on Arthur Perry, Houghland's newly hired assistant (Lugosi). But when Perry is found murdered, it seems that the detective has been outwitted... at least until members of Houghland's household start seeing Perry's ghost. "Murder By Television" has at its heart a great idea, and it could actually have been a neat cross between a murder mystery and a sci-fi thriller... if only the filmmakers had shown even the slightest idea of how to enliven a film, or perhaps even the slightest grasp of how to approach the visual medium that the story revolves around. Instead of being an exciting , "Murder By Television" plays like a bad radio play that someone made a halfhearted attempt at translating into film. Most of the film consists of the actors standing around delivering bad expository dialogue, and it seems that only the comic relief characters (a wide-eyed black cook/maid (played by future Oscar winner Hattie McDaniel), and a self-parodying Chinese houseboy (with secrets of his own) seem to be the only actors who are putting any energy into their parts. Even Lugosi--who can usually be counted on to chew every bit of scenery into tiny pieces--seems to have phoned in his performance. It also doesn't help the film that one of the story's twists is set up in such a ham-fisted way that it ends up not being a twist at all. I kept hoping for a double-reversal, but it never came. Worse, there's an ongoing nonsensical bit with a comic relief character who is constantly trying to break into the house, but it's never explained why. In fairness to the film, the copy I viewed was severely degraded, with many missing frames and at least one scene that seems to be missing almost entirely. Perhaps that is where the "I've got business in the house" character is explained. But, even allowing for that, "Murder By Television" is a dull, badly done B-movie... and I say this having wanted to like it alot. There was so much potential here, and I think it a shame that it was wasted so badly.

    Murder By Television (aka The Houghland Murder Case) Starring: Bela Lugosi, Charles Hill Mailes, and Huntley Gordon Director: Clifford Sanforth In the mid-30s, the promise of television had captivated the imagination of Americans. Experimental broadcasts were being conducted, and science fiction and fantasy writers of all stripes were inventing all sorts of adventures about the wonders and dangers that this amazing new media would present. And that brings us to "Murder By Television", the second out-of-time techno-thriller I've watched that uses the fantastic new medium of televison as its jumping-off point. Sadly, this one isn't anywhere near as good as "Trapped By Television" ([URL=http://www.rottentomatoes.com/vine/journal_view.php?journalid=245672&entryid=248618&view=public]reviewed here[/URL]), despite a promising premise and the presence of some noted mystery/sci-fi genre players. In "Murder By Television", independently wealthy, eccentric, and independent-minded inventor James Houghland (Mailes) has created the perfect television broadcast system. Every corporation that has has been working to commercialize the new technology, and an array of governments ranging from the United States to certain sinister foreign powers want to have control of Houghland's wondrous invention, but he has rebuffed them all. The air is thick with plots and schemes as Houghland gathers friends and fellow inventors--among them criminologist and medical pioneer Dr. Scofield (Gordon)--demonstrates the power of his creation by receiving and rebroadcasting images from around the world, without the use of broadcast towers. His triumphant demonstration is cut short, however, as he is murdered during his live broadcast, for all viewers to see. It seems one of the many factions trying to get their hands on the invention deciced to end the compeition by eliminating the prize. As a police commissioner who had been among Houghland's guests investigates the murder--which is made all the more mysterious by the fact that Houghland simply dropped dead--all suspicion stars to fall on Arthur Perry, Houghland's newly hired assistant (Lugosi). But when Perry is found murdered, it seems that the detective has been outwitted... at least until members of Houghland's household start seeing Perry's ghost. "Murder By Television" has at its heart a great idea, and it could actually have been a neat cross between a murder mystery and a sci-fi thriller... if only the filmmakers had shown even the slightest idea of how to enliven a film, or perhaps even the slightest grasp of how to approach the visual medium that the story revolves around. Instead of being an exciting , "Murder By Television" plays like a bad radio play that someone made a halfhearted attempt at translating into film. Most of the film consists of the actors standing around delivering bad expository dialogue, and it seems that only the comic relief characters (a wide-eyed black cook/maid (played by future Oscar winner Hattie McDaniel), and a self-parodying Chinese houseboy (with secrets of his own) seem to be the only actors who are putting any energy into their parts. Even Lugosi--who can usually be counted on to chew every bit of scenery into tiny pieces--seems to have phoned in his performance. It also doesn't help the film that one of the story's twists is set up in such a ham-fisted way that it ends up not being a twist at all. I kept hoping for a double-reversal, but it never came. Worse, there's an ongoing nonsensical bit with a comic relief character who is constantly trying to break into the house, but it's never explained why. In fairness to the film, the copy I viewed was severely degraded, with many missing frames and at least one scene that seems to be missing almost entirely. Perhaps that is where the "I've got business in the house" character is explained. But, even allowing for that, "Murder By Television" is a dull, badly done B-movie... and I say this having wanted to like it alot. There was so much potential here, and I think it a shame that it was wasted so badly.