Paper Moon Reviews

  • Jul 30, 2019

    great film. as good today day as it was in 1973. Ryan O'Neal is good but Tatum O'Neal steals the show

    great film. as good today day as it was in 1973. Ryan O'Neal is good but Tatum O'Neal steals the show

  • Feb 02, 2019

    The best comedy movie ever made!

    The best comedy movie ever made!

  • Dec 13, 2018

    Tatum O'Neal's acting debut is undoubtedly impressive, but it's the chemistry between her and her real-life father Ryan O'Neal that just blew me away. Honestly, I couldn't help thinking about Charlie Chaplin and Jack Coogan from The Kid! The ending is a tad bit predictable, though. Nevertheless, the execution is pretty exquisite that kept me from being very sure about how the movie will end. Also, the ending is as heartwarming and sweet as the whole movie. So, it's not really a big problem. What amazed me is how smartly scripted this movie is. The way the problems are solved in the plot is genius. The main characters keep get in troubles a lot through their journey, and they get out of them in a convincing and intelligent way. But it's also silly and ridiculous at the same time to match the nostalgic approach that Peter Bogdanovich took from the get-go. That's really a lesson that many directors and screenwriters should learn nowadays; which is that when they decide to capture the essence of a bygone cinematic era, they have to make their film relevant to a modern audience by making it seem smarter and more sensible, hence more convincing. Every sub-plot is consistent, amusing, and really adds to the characters and the main storyline. The sub-plot of Trixie also has no shortage of brilliance and fun, but I think it didn't need to be that long. It felt like that it was a pitfall that the screenwriter fell into, but didn't want to get out of it in an unconvincing and flimsy way so he had to take his time planning a reasonable and plausible way. That said, I enjoyed every second of this very sub-plot as much as the entire movie. Paper Moon is simply a thoroughly engaging, very moving and touching, quite charming, surprisingly clever and sincere ode to Depression-era road movies. (9/10)

    Tatum O'Neal's acting debut is undoubtedly impressive, but it's the chemistry between her and her real-life father Ryan O'Neal that just blew me away. Honestly, I couldn't help thinking about Charlie Chaplin and Jack Coogan from The Kid! The ending is a tad bit predictable, though. Nevertheless, the execution is pretty exquisite that kept me from being very sure about how the movie will end. Also, the ending is as heartwarming and sweet as the whole movie. So, it's not really a big problem. What amazed me is how smartly scripted this movie is. The way the problems are solved in the plot is genius. The main characters keep get in troubles a lot through their journey, and they get out of them in a convincing and intelligent way. But it's also silly and ridiculous at the same time to match the nostalgic approach that Peter Bogdanovich took from the get-go. That's really a lesson that many directors and screenwriters should learn nowadays; which is that when they decide to capture the essence of a bygone cinematic era, they have to make their film relevant to a modern audience by making it seem smarter and more sensible, hence more convincing. Every sub-plot is consistent, amusing, and really adds to the characters and the main storyline. The sub-plot of Trixie also has no shortage of brilliance and fun, but I think it didn't need to be that long. It felt like that it was a pitfall that the screenwriter fell into, but didn't want to get out of it in an unconvincing and flimsy way so he had to take his time planning a reasonable and plausible way. That said, I enjoyed every second of this very sub-plot as much as the entire movie. Paper Moon is simply a thoroughly engaging, very moving and touching, quite charming, surprisingly clever and sincere ode to Depression-era road movies. (9/10)

  • Kevin M. W Super Reviewer
    Aug 11, 2018

    Tatum O'Neal delivers an Oscar quality performance, stealing every scene she's in, in Bogdanavich's nostalgic evocation of Prohibition-era Depression days as a pair of con artists move through middle American farm country. "Times might've been hard," Bogdanavich seems to imply, "but at least we were together." The best road trips are never over with. Ryan is good in this as well.

    Tatum O'Neal delivers an Oscar quality performance, stealing every scene she's in, in Bogdanavich's nostalgic evocation of Prohibition-era Depression days as a pair of con artists move through middle American farm country. "Times might've been hard," Bogdanavich seems to imply, "but at least we were together." The best road trips are never over with. Ryan is good in this as well.

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    Alec B Super Reviewer
    Jul 22, 2018

    The period details are fantastic, but what's really impressive is how through a few clever camera angles and close-ups Bogdanovich is able to get you entirely invested in Tatum O'Neal's character.

    The period details are fantastic, but what's really impressive is how through a few clever camera angles and close-ups Bogdanovich is able to get you entirely invested in Tatum O'Neal's character.

  • Jul 15, 2018

    A hustler teams up with a little girl to swindle people in an attempt to survive in the great depression. From the sounds of this plot, you would think that its a horrible film. But, the way it was done and because of the chemistry between the hustler and the girl, it was great. I thought there was alot to like about this movie

    A hustler teams up with a little girl to swindle people in an attempt to survive in the great depression. From the sounds of this plot, you would think that its a horrible film. But, the way it was done and because of the chemistry between the hustler and the girl, it was great. I thought there was alot to like about this movie

  • Jun 22, 2018

    Just saw it for the first time on the big screen. Fantastic. Beaut i black and white, funny, unexpected, touching, off beat. One of a kind gem.

    Just saw it for the first time on the big screen. Fantastic. Beaut i black and white, funny, unexpected, touching, off beat. One of a kind gem.

  • Jan 13, 2018

    I could already tell the Bible salesman was two faced. That old factory plant shed has a very intersting architecture about it. Very vintage looking. They really got the setting and the time period nailed. The chemistry between real life father (Ryan O'Neal) and daughter (Tatum O'Neal) is wonderful in this movie. The reveal that shows how much of a con man the bible salesman is, had me surprised. Seeing that little girl smoking had me laughing. That whole money exchange bit was pretty slick. You start to see as the movie progresses how the girl has a good heart and hopefully is teaching the bible salesman some lessons in humanity. The girl is very clever and observant. Love that gum ball machine metaphor that black girl says. She was fucking hilarious, throwing the lady's luggage and things around in the car. When Trixie fell going up the hill and yelled, "Son of a bitch", that had me laughing for like 5 minutes straight. That was some funny shit. Trixie and the bible salesman make a good team too. They were in the movie, What's Up Doc?. That laugh they both did in the car. That one cop was crooked. This movie's almost like Bonnie & Clyde. Overall, really funny movie. Had me laughing a good amount. Really nice to see the whole father daughter dynamic and their adventures.

    I could already tell the Bible salesman was two faced. That old factory plant shed has a very intersting architecture about it. Very vintage looking. They really got the setting and the time period nailed. The chemistry between real life father (Ryan O'Neal) and daughter (Tatum O'Neal) is wonderful in this movie. The reveal that shows how much of a con man the bible salesman is, had me surprised. Seeing that little girl smoking had me laughing. That whole money exchange bit was pretty slick. You start to see as the movie progresses how the girl has a good heart and hopefully is teaching the bible salesman some lessons in humanity. The girl is very clever and observant. Love that gum ball machine metaphor that black girl says. She was fucking hilarious, throwing the lady's luggage and things around in the car. When Trixie fell going up the hill and yelled, "Son of a bitch", that had me laughing for like 5 minutes straight. That was some funny shit. Trixie and the bible salesman make a good team too. They were in the movie, What's Up Doc?. That laugh they both did in the car. That one cop was crooked. This movie's almost like Bonnie & Clyde. Overall, really funny movie. Had me laughing a good amount. Really nice to see the whole father daughter dynamic and their adventures.

  • Dec 20, 2017

    I loved this film growing up. Watched it a lot . Loved Tatum and her father together they have great chemistry. Made me want to love my father too.

    I loved this film growing up. Watched it a lot . Loved Tatum and her father together they have great chemistry. Made me want to love my father too.

  • Sep 02, 2017

    Kansas, 1930s. 9-year old Addie Loggins's mother has just died, leaving her alone (she never knew her father). Moses Pray is a con man and initially uses Addie's misfortune to make some money off a third party. With that done, he tries to pack her off on a train to her aunt in Missouri, but Addie won't have any of that. They set off for her aunt's place by car, with neither having much time for the other, initially... Wonderful movie, directed by Peter Bogdanovich and based on the novel "Addie Pray" by Joe David Brown. Solid, evolving broad plot and great detail too. The cons the two pull are fantastic in their concept and execution. Quite funny, with many amusing adventures and conspiracies. Very engaging - the main characters and their interaction absolutely pull you in. Very emotional ending. Great work by Ryan O'Neal as Moses. Tatum O'Neal, his daughter, is superb as Addie and well-deserved her Best Supporting Actress Oscar. Her playing of the street-smart, wise-beyond-her-years Addie is spot-on and a sight to behold. Tatum is still the youngest ever winner of a competitive Oscar, winning at only 10 years old. Good work too from Madeline Kahn, who got a Best Supporting Actress nomination for her efforts.

    Kansas, 1930s. 9-year old Addie Loggins's mother has just died, leaving her alone (she never knew her father). Moses Pray is a con man and initially uses Addie's misfortune to make some money off a third party. With that done, he tries to pack her off on a train to her aunt in Missouri, but Addie won't have any of that. They set off for her aunt's place by car, with neither having much time for the other, initially... Wonderful movie, directed by Peter Bogdanovich and based on the novel "Addie Pray" by Joe David Brown. Solid, evolving broad plot and great detail too. The cons the two pull are fantastic in their concept and execution. Quite funny, with many amusing adventures and conspiracies. Very engaging - the main characters and their interaction absolutely pull you in. Very emotional ending. Great work by Ryan O'Neal as Moses. Tatum O'Neal, his daughter, is superb as Addie and well-deserved her Best Supporting Actress Oscar. Her playing of the street-smart, wise-beyond-her-years Addie is spot-on and a sight to behold. Tatum is still the youngest ever winner of a competitive Oscar, winning at only 10 years old. Good work too from Madeline Kahn, who got a Best Supporting Actress nomination for her efforts.