PK Reviews

  • 10h ago

    Hinduphobic but entertaining

    Hinduphobic but entertaining

  • Jun 25, 2019

    Great movie delivering a nice message to society... Amir Khan was just amazing to Act

    Great movie delivering a nice message to society... Amir Khan was just amazing to Act

  • May 21, 2019

    Exploring religious ideas in a country as tight as India is a bold move and combining it with sci-fi genre and comedy made it a good movie. Asking serious questions while making people laugh is not something any movie can pull off but Mr.Hirani did. Watched it five years after release and enjoyed it so much.

    Exploring religious ideas in a country as tight as India is a bold move and combining it with sci-fi genre and comedy made it a good movie. Asking serious questions while making people laugh is not something any movie can pull off but Mr.Hirani did. Watched it five years after release and enjoyed it so much.

  • Apr 13, 2019

    I may not agree with everything about all the religions but the questions he makes you ask are good. Wrong number is a good concept. Always ask questions and follow no man just on his word. Adorable love story. <3

    I may not agree with everything about all the religions but the questions he makes you ask are good. Wrong number is a good concept. Always ask questions and follow no man just on his word. Adorable love story. <3

  • Feb 09, 2019

    A great movie for humanity. Nowdays, people attract to prejudice and wrong religion. They pray wrong Gods that was nevet create. This movie must watch Hindu peoples. It proofs that Islam is True and Allah is right we all should pray Allah

    A great movie for humanity. Nowdays, people attract to prejudice and wrong religion. They pray wrong Gods that was nevet create. This movie must watch Hindu peoples. It proofs that Islam is True and Allah is right we all should pray Allah

  • Feb 06, 2019

    This film is a brave exposition of the conundrum between God and organised religion. The unique approach of couching such a sensitive subject behind a seemingly comedic premise of a visitor from another world, is much to be admired and unexpectedly refreshing. Aamir Khan gave a superb and moving portrayal of a hapless outer space visitor, who had an innate sense of truth and compassion.

    This film is a brave exposition of the conundrum between God and organised religion. The unique approach of couching such a sensitive subject behind a seemingly comedic premise of a visitor from another world, is much to be admired and unexpectedly refreshing. Aamir Khan gave a superb and moving portrayal of a hapless outer space visitor, who had an innate sense of truth and compassion.

  • Jan 22, 2019

    It's very funny but it makes me cry every time I see it that's why I gave it 3.5/5

    It's very funny but it makes me cry every time I see it that's why I gave it 3.5/5

  • Nov 16, 2018

    PK is a fantastic film directed by Rajkumar Hirani and I would recommend it to anyone who wants a Bollywood film filled with rich substance. Firstly, Aamir Khan and Anushka Sharma give an outstanding performance in this film. Aamir Khan plays the role of PK, an alien from a distance planet who's on a quest to find the remote control for his spaceship, so he can go back home. Anushka Sharma, who plays an ambitious reporter, Jaggu, befriends PK and helps him on his journey. Similar to the famous Bollywood love story Veer Zaara, PK promotes secularism, but takes it to a larger level. Like Veer Zaara the main love interest in PK is between a Pakistani boy, Sarfaraz, and Jaggu, a Hindustani. Kavita Daiya in her article "Violent Belongings" talks about how Veer Zaara focuses on people who identify as either Muslim or Hindu and manage to set aside their differences. PK does this on a larger scale. Through PK's quest on finding his remote we get a crash course of the various religions practiced in India. This is unique to PK because viewers are introduced to religions other than Islam, Hinduism and Sikhism which are classically portrayed in Bollywood. PK has all aspects of a Bollywood film, the music, the dance sequences, a heartfelt love story, cheesy humor but it goes the extra mile because teaches its viewers about religious tolerance in a respectful manner and promotes loving others no matter what their identity is, which is why this film is easily one of my favorites. If you like sci-fi, humor, meaningful messages and Aamir Khan, this film is for you.

    PK is a fantastic film directed by Rajkumar Hirani and I would recommend it to anyone who wants a Bollywood film filled with rich substance. Firstly, Aamir Khan and Anushka Sharma give an outstanding performance in this film. Aamir Khan plays the role of PK, an alien from a distance planet who's on a quest to find the remote control for his spaceship, so he can go back home. Anushka Sharma, who plays an ambitious reporter, Jaggu, befriends PK and helps him on his journey. Similar to the famous Bollywood love story Veer Zaara, PK promotes secularism, but takes it to a larger level. Like Veer Zaara the main love interest in PK is between a Pakistani boy, Sarfaraz, and Jaggu, a Hindustani. Kavita Daiya in her article "Violent Belongings" talks about how Veer Zaara focuses on people who identify as either Muslim or Hindu and manage to set aside their differences. PK does this on a larger scale. Through PK's quest on finding his remote we get a crash course of the various religions practiced in India. This is unique to PK because viewers are introduced to religions other than Islam, Hinduism and Sikhism which are classically portrayed in Bollywood. PK has all aspects of a Bollywood film, the music, the dance sequences, a heartfelt love story, cheesy humor but it goes the extra mile because teaches its viewers about religious tolerance in a respectful manner and promotes loving others no matter what their identity is, which is why this film is easily one of my favorites. If you like sci-fi, humor, meaningful messages and Aamir Khan, this film is for you.

  • Nov 16, 2018

    PK is a highly enjoyable and complex film that features great performances by Amir Khan and Anushka Sharma. It manages to discuss complex political issues in a fun and entertaining way, while tying in sci-fi elements flawlessly. It's a great discussion of secularism as an inclusiveness of all religions and nationalities, and provides great insight into relations between India and Pakistan. While the film is comparable to the the 2004 hit Veer-Zaara due to its overarching message about relations between India and Pakistan, it differs from Veer-Zaara by providing an 'outsider's' perspective (in the character of PK, an alien), and is packed full of humor. It's a great film to look at as a continuation of Saba Naqvi Bhaumik's thesis in the article, "Politics of Indian War Films," as the film industry can be seen to be moving in a more secular and inclusive direction over the years. The article demonstrates that from Gadar, to Veer-Zaara, the atmosphere of film has moved from 'othering' Pakistanis and accentuating the divide between India, to discussing secularism in a truly moving way. Now, ten years after Veer-Zaara, PK shows audiences that secularism has increased as international tensions have decreased, and that the deeper issues in the attitudes Pakistan and India can be discussed in a comedic, enjoyable and still thought-provoking way. While Veer-Zaara was a plea for change, PK functions as a celebration of diversity and an encouragement for the continuation of positive change between India and Pakistan, and director Rajkumar Hirani has really done a fantastic job with the film as a whole. On a more personal note, I absolutely loved this film, and think that it really did something special with its combination of sci-fi and humor. It was really powerful, despite the fact that I am not an avid follower of Indian or Pakistani politics. PK was a fabulous character, and highly enjoyable to watch on screen, and the love story between the characters of Jaggu and Sarfaraz made the movie even more compelling to watch. I would highly recommend PK to anyone who wants to laugh a bit while celebrating diversity, true love, and the innocence of extraterrestrials.

    PK is a highly enjoyable and complex film that features great performances by Amir Khan and Anushka Sharma. It manages to discuss complex political issues in a fun and entertaining way, while tying in sci-fi elements flawlessly. It's a great discussion of secularism as an inclusiveness of all religions and nationalities, and provides great insight into relations between India and Pakistan. While the film is comparable to the the 2004 hit Veer-Zaara due to its overarching message about relations between India and Pakistan, it differs from Veer-Zaara by providing an 'outsider's' perspective (in the character of PK, an alien), and is packed full of humor. It's a great film to look at as a continuation of Saba Naqvi Bhaumik's thesis in the article, "Politics of Indian War Films," as the film industry can be seen to be moving in a more secular and inclusive direction over the years. The article demonstrates that from Gadar, to Veer-Zaara, the atmosphere of film has moved from 'othering' Pakistanis and accentuating the divide between India, to discussing secularism in a truly moving way. Now, ten years after Veer-Zaara, PK shows audiences that secularism has increased as international tensions have decreased, and that the deeper issues in the attitudes Pakistan and India can be discussed in a comedic, enjoyable and still thought-provoking way. While Veer-Zaara was a plea for change, PK functions as a celebration of diversity and an encouragement for the continuation of positive change between India and Pakistan, and director Rajkumar Hirani has really done a fantastic job with the film as a whole. On a more personal note, I absolutely loved this film, and think that it really did something special with its combination of sci-fi and humor. It was really powerful, despite the fact that I am not an avid follower of Indian or Pakistani politics. PK was a fabulous character, and highly enjoyable to watch on screen, and the love story between the characters of Jaggu and Sarfaraz made the movie even more compelling to watch. I would highly recommend PK to anyone who wants to laugh a bit while celebrating diversity, true love, and the innocence of extraterrestrials.

  • Nov 16, 2018

    PK was directed by Rajkumar Hirani and written by Hirani and Abhijat Joshi. The film was released in 2014 and became the highest grossing Indian film of all time. It's no wonder the film was so successful as the plot of PK follows a humanoid alien who, upon landing on Earth, has the control to his spaceship stolen. I was worried that I wouldn't like the film because of the alien aspect, but soon I forgot it was about an alien at all. Immediately the viewers are thrown into a lost and found formula, with the stakes raised significantly (across planets and universes). On his search for his controller the alien, PK, encounters the human concept of God. In the hopes of enlisting God's help in retrieving the controls to his spaceship, PK worships God under each of the religions in India. During PK's religious journey he meets a TV journalist, Jaggu, who decides to help him get home. Similar to Veer's trust of the lawyer Saamiya in the film Veer-Zaara, PK chooses to trust Jaggu because she treats him with respect at one of his lowest points. In Veer-Zaara, Veer trusts Saamiya because she uses his true name when interviewing him in his prison cell. Jaggu also meets PK in his prison cell, and PK decides to trust her because she is the first person to spend money on him instead of asking for his own money. This idea of money begins the criticism of religion by PK. PK begins to question why God asks for so many things, like money, but gives no sound advice or returns to His followers. The film concludes with a national questioning of religion and religious boundaries between people. More specifically, Jaggu questions throughout the entire film how religion could keep her and her lover, Sarfaraz, apart. PK's pairing with a strong female character such as Jaggu is not accidental. While PK questions the nation's faith, Jaggu questions the nation's expectation of women. In the article, "Cinema India: The Visual Culture of Hindi Film" written by Rachel Dwyer and Divia Patel, Dwyer and Patel mention the significance of short hair on female characters. Dwyer and Patel state that young women with short hair in Bollywood represent characters who step outside of the norm. Jaggu acts as a strong, independent female character who not only falls in love with a Muslim Pakistani man, but who stands up to her (male) boss in order to help an alien question India's religions. PK does an outstanding job of questioning societal and religious norms while still ending with a heartwarming message. I would recommend this film to any who are interested in stories of religion and epic love stories.

    PK was directed by Rajkumar Hirani and written by Hirani and Abhijat Joshi. The film was released in 2014 and became the highest grossing Indian film of all time. It's no wonder the film was so successful as the plot of PK follows a humanoid alien who, upon landing on Earth, has the control to his spaceship stolen. I was worried that I wouldn't like the film because of the alien aspect, but soon I forgot it was about an alien at all. Immediately the viewers are thrown into a lost and found formula, with the stakes raised significantly (across planets and universes). On his search for his controller the alien, PK, encounters the human concept of God. In the hopes of enlisting God's help in retrieving the controls to his spaceship, PK worships God under each of the religions in India. During PK's religious journey he meets a TV journalist, Jaggu, who decides to help him get home. Similar to Veer's trust of the lawyer Saamiya in the film Veer-Zaara, PK chooses to trust Jaggu because she treats him with respect at one of his lowest points. In Veer-Zaara, Veer trusts Saamiya because she uses his true name when interviewing him in his prison cell. Jaggu also meets PK in his prison cell, and PK decides to trust her because she is the first person to spend money on him instead of asking for his own money. This idea of money begins the criticism of religion by PK. PK begins to question why God asks for so many things, like money, but gives no sound advice or returns to His followers. The film concludes with a national questioning of religion and religious boundaries between people. More specifically, Jaggu questions throughout the entire film how religion could keep her and her lover, Sarfaraz, apart. PK's pairing with a strong female character such as Jaggu is not accidental. While PK questions the nation's faith, Jaggu questions the nation's expectation of women. In the article, "Cinema India: The Visual Culture of Hindi Film" written by Rachel Dwyer and Divia Patel, Dwyer and Patel mention the significance of short hair on female characters. Dwyer and Patel state that young women with short hair in Bollywood represent characters who step outside of the norm. Jaggu acts as a strong, independent female character who not only falls in love with a Muslim Pakistani man, but who stands up to her (male) boss in order to help an alien question India's religions. PK does an outstanding job of questioning societal and religious norms while still ending with a heartwarming message. I would recommend this film to any who are interested in stories of religion and epic love stories.