Prince of Foxes Reviews

  • Feb 18, 2016

    good action/adventure yarn

    good action/adventure yarn

  • Oct 29, 2015

    Death shall not be a burden to the living. A young prince has a supporting princess wife to be and they plan to rule their kingdom and rule it well; however, an associate betrays them and helps an invader trying to take over the kingdom. The prince and princess will need to strategize a plan to overcome impossible odds if they hope to save themselves and their people. "I was thinking." "Good. Practice makes perfect." Henry King, director of Twelve O'clock High, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, The Song of Bernadette, Carousel, The Gunfighter, and The Black Swann (1942), delivers Prince of Foxes. The storyline for this picture felt a little Shakespearian with some solid dialogue and larger than life characters. The action was okay but the acting was excellent. The cast includes Tyrone Power, Orson Welles, Wanda Hendrix, and Everett Sloane. "Have you the stomach for greatness?" "The stomach and the appetite." This was recommended to me by Fios so I DVR'd it off FXM. This was interesting and Power and Welles deliver excellent performances. The conclusion comes together well; however, this isn't as good as similar films released in this era starring Errol Flynn. Overall, this is worth a viewing but not worth adding to your classic film DVD collection unless it's due to the cast. "A wise tongue never needs to repeat itself." Grade: B-

    Death shall not be a burden to the living. A young prince has a supporting princess wife to be and they plan to rule their kingdom and rule it well; however, an associate betrays them and helps an invader trying to take over the kingdom. The prince and princess will need to strategize a plan to overcome impossible odds if they hope to save themselves and their people. "I was thinking." "Good. Practice makes perfect." Henry King, director of Twelve O'clock High, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, The Song of Bernadette, Carousel, The Gunfighter, and The Black Swann (1942), delivers Prince of Foxes. The storyline for this picture felt a little Shakespearian with some solid dialogue and larger than life characters. The action was okay but the acting was excellent. The cast includes Tyrone Power, Orson Welles, Wanda Hendrix, and Everett Sloane. "Have you the stomach for greatness?" "The stomach and the appetite." This was recommended to me by Fios so I DVR'd it off FXM. This was interesting and Power and Welles deliver excellent performances. The conclusion comes together well; however, this isn't as good as similar films released in this era starring Errol Flynn. Overall, this is worth a viewing but not worth adding to your classic film DVD collection unless it's due to the cast. "A wise tongue never needs to repeat itself." Grade: B-

  • Feb 17, 2013

    Pretty good plot. Acting was good, but the costumes could be a little bit better.

    Pretty good plot. Acting was good, but the costumes could be a little bit better.

  • Jan 12, 2013

    Historical swashbuckling joy that is expertly written--Orson Welles & Everett Sloane Revel Amid Medieval Pomp & Panoply!!

    Historical swashbuckling joy that is expertly written--Orson Welles & Everett Sloane Revel Amid Medieval Pomp & Panoply!!

  • Dec 15, 2012

    Loved Orson Welles as Cesare Borgia, and, of course, Everett Sloane makes this picture. The script was such a good adaption of Samuel Shellabarger's book. And Tyrone Power plays his usual confident, cocky, swashbuckling self as the hero, full of charm and wit. Pure entertainment!

    Loved Orson Welles as Cesare Borgia, and, of course, Everett Sloane makes this picture. The script was such a good adaption of Samuel Shellabarger's book. And Tyrone Power plays his usual confident, cocky, swashbuckling self as the hero, full of charm and wit. Pure entertainment!

  • Jan 12, 2012

    A sprawling story of Renaissance politics, betrayal, and love, this epic tale is well-shot and beautifully cast. Tyrone Power plays the spy of the evil duke (Orson Welles), sent into the castle of a small, peaceful village. Love mingles his quest for power, and true loyalty emerges. Tender scenes dot the already breathtaking landscape of on-location European architecture and hillsides. A moving story, and much fulfilling.

    A sprawling story of Renaissance politics, betrayal, and love, this epic tale is well-shot and beautifully cast. Tyrone Power plays the spy of the evil duke (Orson Welles), sent into the castle of a small, peaceful village. Love mingles his quest for power, and true loyalty emerges. Tender scenes dot the already breathtaking landscape of on-location European architecture and hillsides. A moving story, and much fulfilling.

  • Nov 15, 2010

    Prince Of Foxes was released the same year as The Third Man, and in one Orson Welles, as Harry Lime, says "In Italy for thirty years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, bloodshedâ"but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love, 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock." It is the signature moment in the film and sums an ethos that signifies an attitude of self-exalted anarchy embodied by Lime. In Prince Of Foxes Welles plays Cesare Borgia himself and brings pretty much the same crafty-eyed cynicism to the character expressed in the tone of the above stated sentiment. We thought Prince Of Foxes was a reasonably fun film with an good cast, notably a stand-out performance from Everett Sloane. Welles was his usual wicked self, and Tyrone Power gave us some moves we found reminiscent of what he did in Nightmare Alley, and Wanda Hendrix was fine and at times enchanting. We found the story overall to be average in terms of dramatic power, yet informative, with some tasty philosophical reflections and reasonable developments in character and the like, set against actual locations in Italy which gave it a lovely period look. The cinematography had it's fine moments, especially in exploring the features of Sloan's face and the local countryside. Art and artifice are central themes, explored in entertaining ways, and there is some derring-do and swordplay to round it all out. A history lesson? Hardly, but a reasonable evocation of period and some actual characters and, one presumes, a bit of a taste of what life was like back then over there. Too bad we didn't get to see Da Vinci building those catapults they used to attack the castle...

    Prince Of Foxes was released the same year as The Third Man, and in one Orson Welles, as Harry Lime, says "In Italy for thirty years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, bloodshedâ"but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love, 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock." It is the signature moment in the film and sums an ethos that signifies an attitude of self-exalted anarchy embodied by Lime. In Prince Of Foxes Welles plays Cesare Borgia himself and brings pretty much the same crafty-eyed cynicism to the character expressed in the tone of the above stated sentiment. We thought Prince Of Foxes was a reasonably fun film with an good cast, notably a stand-out performance from Everett Sloane. Welles was his usual wicked self, and Tyrone Power gave us some moves we found reminiscent of what he did in Nightmare Alley, and Wanda Hendrix was fine and at times enchanting. We found the story overall to be average in terms of dramatic power, yet informative, with some tasty philosophical reflections and reasonable developments in character and the like, set against actual locations in Italy which gave it a lovely period look. The cinematography had it's fine moments, especially in exploring the features of Sloan's face and the local countryside. Art and artifice are central themes, explored in entertaining ways, and there is some derring-do and swordplay to round it all out. A history lesson? Hardly, but a reasonable evocation of period and some actual characters and, one presumes, a bit of a taste of what life was like back then over there. Too bad we didn't get to see Da Vinci building those catapults they used to attack the castle...

  • Oct 03, 2010

    Errol Flynn may have been the king of swashbucklers during Hollywood's Golden Years, but Tyrone Power was a close second, and as he did in "The Mark of Zorro" and "The Black Swan," he proves it in "Prince of Foxes." It's more of a costumed drama with some good action scenes rather than an all-out swashbuckler, but that's nothing to complain about - especially since it's a well-written, well-acted, well-filmed drama with steady pacing. Based on the novel by Samuel Shellabarger, The movie takes place in the early 1500s in Renaissance Italy, which is fragmented into numerous smaller city-states with their own rule. Cesare Borgia (Orson Welles) or the infamous Borgia family, intends to unite Italy under his banner, and dispatches his most trusted agent, Captain Andrea Orsini (Tyrone Power) to use his gift for cunning and guile to manipulate events to enable Borgia's conquest with minimal effort. However, Orsini has a change of heart, courtesy of a lovely noblewoman (Wanda Hendrix) whose husband he is supposed to betray to Borgia. He ends up turning on Borgia, leading to spectacular battle scenes and a surprising betrayal I did not see coming (I won't tell you who does the betraying or who gets betrayed). Filmed on location in Italy, "Prince of Foxes" is a lavish production, and while I usually have no problem watching movies in black and white, the sets and costumes make me wish I could have seen them in color. As mentioned before, Power performs well here, and Welles makes an imposing villain. The movie benefits from being directed by Henry King, who's no stranger to directing quality movies of this genre. The supporting cast is also strong and compelling, and helps make a solid movie even better. A great movie that I'd definitely see again, and another winner for Tyrone Power.

    Errol Flynn may have been the king of swashbucklers during Hollywood's Golden Years, but Tyrone Power was a close second, and as he did in "The Mark of Zorro" and "The Black Swan," he proves it in "Prince of Foxes." It's more of a costumed drama with some good action scenes rather than an all-out swashbuckler, but that's nothing to complain about - especially since it's a well-written, well-acted, well-filmed drama with steady pacing. Based on the novel by Samuel Shellabarger, The movie takes place in the early 1500s in Renaissance Italy, which is fragmented into numerous smaller city-states with their own rule. Cesare Borgia (Orson Welles) or the infamous Borgia family, intends to unite Italy under his banner, and dispatches his most trusted agent, Captain Andrea Orsini (Tyrone Power) to use his gift for cunning and guile to manipulate events to enable Borgia's conquest with minimal effort. However, Orsini has a change of heart, courtesy of a lovely noblewoman (Wanda Hendrix) whose husband he is supposed to betray to Borgia. He ends up turning on Borgia, leading to spectacular battle scenes and a surprising betrayal I did not see coming (I won't tell you who does the betraying or who gets betrayed). Filmed on location in Italy, "Prince of Foxes" is a lavish production, and while I usually have no problem watching movies in black and white, the sets and costumes make me wish I could have seen them in color. As mentioned before, Power performs well here, and Welles makes an imposing villain. The movie benefits from being directed by Henry King, who's no stranger to directing quality movies of this genre. The supporting cast is also strong and compelling, and helps make a solid movie even better. A great movie that I'd definitely see again, and another winner for Tyrone Power.

  • jay n Super Reviewer
    Jan 11, 2010

    Average costumer with Ty starting off an adventurer looking for the best of it but redeeming himself in the end. Orson in a role that unfortunately is far to small comes off best with an enjoyable mixture of humor and malevolence, some of his outfits though defy understanding!

    Average costumer with Ty starting off an adventurer looking for the best of it but redeeming himself in the end. Orson in a role that unfortunately is far to small comes off best with an enjoyable mixture of humor and malevolence, some of his outfits though defy understanding!

  • Oct 23, 2009

    An all time classic. Superbly acted and directed.

    An all time classic. Superbly acted and directed.