Ramchand Pakistani Reviews

  • Feb 02, 2013

    This was a great movie - coming of age, in jail. The cinematography could have been better. They needed to expand on the story of the mother and the man she was cookin food for. The storyline is based on a true story so was captivating to know that it was real. It leaves you wondering what happened to the real Ramchand though, and all the other prisoners.

    This was a great movie - coming of age, in jail. The cinematography could have been better. They needed to expand on the story of the mother and the man she was cookin food for. The storyline is based on a true story so was captivating to know that it was real. It leaves you wondering what happened to the real Ramchand though, and all the other prisoners.

  • May 26, 2010

    very different movie........it was nice and good performances although screenplay is weak could have been far better....................

    very different movie........it was nice and good performances although screenplay is weak could have been far better....................

  • May 10, 2010

    A technically incompetent execution of a good story. Excellently acted by most of the cast. In fact Nandita looks way too dramatic in an ensemble of mostly natural actors (and non-actors).

    A technically incompetent execution of a good story. Excellently acted by most of the cast. In fact Nandita looks way too dramatic in an ensemble of mostly natural actors (and non-actors).

  • Apr 27, 2010

    Although it drags on for most of its 103 minutes with awkward transitions and scoring, the plight of a family to reconnect is enough to keep you in your seat for the conclusion. The colors are amazing, and most of the scenes are pure eye candy.

    Although it drags on for most of its 103 minutes with awkward transitions and scoring, the plight of a family to reconnect is enough to keep you in your seat for the conclusion. The colors are amazing, and most of the scenes are pure eye candy.

  • Apr 04, 2010

    Pakistani Hindus end up in hot water in India *** This review may contain spoilers *** One of the more unusual films at the Tribeca Film Festival. It's a Pakistani film but it's about a father and 8 year old child, Hindus of an untouchable caste, who wander across the border and are arrested by Indian soldiers. The father and the child end up being imprisoned for five years in India; meanwhile, the child's mother ends up working as an indentured servant but never gives up hope that her husband and child will return. At first, the Indian soldiers appear quite cruel and assume that the father and child are terrorists. The father ends up being tortured but eventually the two are sent to a prison camp for detainees where they receive considerably better treatment. The best thing about Ramchand Pakistani are the talented kids who play the 8 year old child (and later the older 13 year old). The child is rambunctious and comes to be loved by the detainees at the jail. The father keeps getting in trouble when he fights other detainees who he believes are trying to take advantage of his son. Some of the strongest scenes in the film occur between an Indian soldier, a woman who is appointed as the child's matron/teacher. In the beginning, she has contempt for Ramchand (the child) because he's from an untouchable caste; but eventually the child wins her over as he is a charming rake. The film gets a little bogged down when we cut to the scenes with the mother who spends three years paying off her husband's debt to a landlord on a farm. Some of the scenes show her solitary longing for her lost child and husband and those get a little repetitious. There's also a bit of a subplot with the wife becoming attracted to another man but that also is a bit slow-moving. Many of the detainees in the prison camp end up to be lovable losers and are drawn mainly as comic relief. I'm not sure that those characters represent real portraits of prison camp inmates. The film ends on a happy note when Ramchand is paroled and returns to his village and reunites with his mother. We learn later that the husband is released too. This is a colorful and moving film which shows a side of the world which most westerners are not familiar with. It also promotes Pakistani-Indian cooperation which is to be commended.

    Pakistani Hindus end up in hot water in India *** This review may contain spoilers *** One of the more unusual films at the Tribeca Film Festival. It's a Pakistani film but it's about a father and 8 year old child, Hindus of an untouchable caste, who wander across the border and are arrested by Indian soldiers. The father and the child end up being imprisoned for five years in India; meanwhile, the child's mother ends up working as an indentured servant but never gives up hope that her husband and child will return. At first, the Indian soldiers appear quite cruel and assume that the father and child are terrorists. The father ends up being tortured but eventually the two are sent to a prison camp for detainees where they receive considerably better treatment. The best thing about Ramchand Pakistani are the talented kids who play the 8 year old child (and later the older 13 year old). The child is rambunctious and comes to be loved by the detainees at the jail. The father keeps getting in trouble when he fights other detainees who he believes are trying to take advantage of his son. Some of the strongest scenes in the film occur between an Indian soldier, a woman who is appointed as the child's matron/teacher. In the beginning, she has contempt for Ramchand (the child) because he's from an untouchable caste; but eventually the child wins her over as he is a charming rake. The film gets a little bogged down when we cut to the scenes with the mother who spends three years paying off her husband's debt to a landlord on a farm. Some of the scenes show her solitary longing for her lost child and husband and those get a little repetitious. There's also a bit of a subplot with the wife becoming attracted to another man but that also is a bit slow-moving. Many of the detainees in the prison camp end up to be lovable losers and are drawn mainly as comic relief. I'm not sure that those characters represent real portraits of prison camp inmates. The film ends on a happy note when Ramchand is paroled and returns to his village and reunites with his mother. We learn later that the husband is released too. This is a colorful and moving film which shows a side of the world which most westerners are not familiar with. It also promotes Pakistani-Indian cooperation which is to be commended.

  • Dec 10, 2009

    this pakistani movie has given a new life to the industry in pakistan. this movie features some main problems that the people living close to the borders face. it is indeed worth seeing...thumbs up!

    this pakistani movie has given a new life to the industry in pakistan. this movie features some main problems that the people living close to the borders face. it is indeed worth seeing...thumbs up!

  • Apr 19, 2009

    Very emotional story. The fact that such instances are happening in real life takes time to sink in and then you realize the suffering of those who have been jailed for accidentally crossing a "border".

    Very emotional story. The fact that such instances are happening in real life takes time to sink in and then you realize the suffering of those who have been jailed for accidentally crossing a "border".

  • Mar 22, 2009

    Nice story but moves a bit too slowly ..

    Nice story but moves a bit too slowly ..

  • Mar 22, 2009

    A very moving true story that highlights the craziness that exists in the border relations between India and Pakistan. Some good performances by the child actors and the entire supporting cast.

    A very moving true story that highlights the craziness that exists in the border relations between India and Pakistan. Some good performances by the child actors and the entire supporting cast.

  • Mar 11, 2009

    RAMCHAND PAKISTANI is a simple story, a true story in fact, of a kid and his father crossing the LOC and being held captive in an Indian prison. A theme like this ought to be handled with gloves and director Mehreen Jabbar does just that. A sensitively told story that succeeds in making you think of the plight of scores of people who've accidently crossed the border and are, perhaps, still languishing in various jails. The child from Pakistan, aged eight years, learns to cope with the trauma of forced separation from his mother [Nandita Das] while being held prisoner, along with his father in the jail of India. What transpires is the crux of the story. Real life stories are difficult to interpret on reel, but Mehreen Jabbar tries and succeeds. It may not be the most mesmeric tale you've experienced, but the story and how Mehreen and the writers adapt it cinematically makes it a moving experience. RAMCHAND PAKISTANI is also watchable due to the fine performances delivered by just about everyone in its cast. But it works mainly due to Syed Fazal Hussain's sterling act as the young Ramchand. He conveys the pathos and helplessness with aplomb. Even the grown-up Ramchand, Navaid Jabbar, is equally competent. Nandita Das is efficient. Rashid Farooqui [Ramchand's father] is equally competent. Pakistani actors Noman Ijaz, Shahoor and Maria Wasti -- popular names on Pakistani TV circuit - deliver fine performances. On the whole, RAMCHAND PAKISTANI is a simple story well told. Business-wise, the problem is that it faces a strong opposition from two major releases this week. Besides, a film like RAMCHAND PAKISTANI caters to a select audience, which means that it might go unnoticed in the domestic circuit.

    RAMCHAND PAKISTANI is a simple story, a true story in fact, of a kid and his father crossing the LOC and being held captive in an Indian prison. A theme like this ought to be handled with gloves and director Mehreen Jabbar does just that. A sensitively told story that succeeds in making you think of the plight of scores of people who've accidently crossed the border and are, perhaps, still languishing in various jails. The child from Pakistan, aged eight years, learns to cope with the trauma of forced separation from his mother [Nandita Das] while being held prisoner, along with his father in the jail of India. What transpires is the crux of the story. Real life stories are difficult to interpret on reel, but Mehreen Jabbar tries and succeeds. It may not be the most mesmeric tale you've experienced, but the story and how Mehreen and the writers adapt it cinematically makes it a moving experience. RAMCHAND PAKISTANI is also watchable due to the fine performances delivered by just about everyone in its cast. But it works mainly due to Syed Fazal Hussain's sterling act as the young Ramchand. He conveys the pathos and helplessness with aplomb. Even the grown-up Ramchand, Navaid Jabbar, is equally competent. Nandita Das is efficient. Rashid Farooqui [Ramchand's father] is equally competent. Pakistani actors Noman Ijaz, Shahoor and Maria Wasti -- popular names on Pakistani TV circuit - deliver fine performances. On the whole, RAMCHAND PAKISTANI is a simple story well told. Business-wise, the problem is that it faces a strong opposition from two major releases this week. Besides, a film like RAMCHAND PAKISTANI caters to a select audience, which means that it might go unnoticed in the domestic circuit.