Roma Reviews

  • 6d ago

    The amazing director or Gravity and the third Harry Potter film, Alfonso Cuaron gives us another amazing film! It's based on his childhood living in Mexico City, and he tells it in such a beautiful way. The direction and cinematography are absolutely beautiful and so well done, definitely deserving the Oscars that they won! It's a very beautiful and emotional film and it gives us a powerful insight into the life of Alfonso Cuaron.

    The amazing director or Gravity and the third Harry Potter film, Alfonso Cuaron gives us another amazing film! It's based on his childhood living in Mexico City, and he tells it in such a beautiful way. The direction and cinematography are absolutely beautiful and so well done, definitely deserving the Oscars that they won! It's a very beautiful and emotional film and it gives us a powerful insight into the life of Alfonso Cuaron.

  • Jul 04, 2019

    Beautiful and sensitive.

    Beautiful and sensitive.

  • Jul 01, 2019

    What in the world do people see in this movie?! Bored out of my mind, couldn't even finish it. Roma is like watching an uncut 24/7 broadcasting of someone's life. Literally, the first five minutes is a video of water flowing on the floor. I'm so tired of people rating movies well just because they have or were made by excluded races. So rotten.

    What in the world do people see in this movie?! Bored out of my mind, couldn't even finish it. Roma is like watching an uncut 24/7 broadcasting of someone's life. Literally, the first five minutes is a video of water flowing on the floor. I'm so tired of people rating movies well just because they have or were made by excluded races. So rotten.

  • Jun 29, 2019

    Beautiful, thoughtful, historical. Would re-watch.

    Beautiful, thoughtful, historical. Would re-watch.

  • Jun 26, 2019

    I'd give it a 75 %, fresh tomato. It's disappointingly decent. Not at all my favorite film and I won't be deceived by its praise. A masterpiece? Naahhhh, not in my eyes. A Netflix masterpiece, sure. It falls short. In my humble, humble, humble opinions, it's a shock-value story with some astonishing visuals that may force me to re-watch Roma, but I got some bones to pick, 'ight?. K, I give it 3 1/2 stars instead of 2 1/2 because of the way it looks, great casting and its undeniable coolness to watch, HOW-F'ING-EVER, this movie IS the quintessential limitations of a lazy, empathy-addicted, two-hour-long-movie-addicted culture, and I believe Roma's life, probably, deserves much more attention and time on my behalf, in order to work. Roma could easily be used as a lesson against rushed art. Roma should be used for discovering the potential of, perhaps, a 6 hour long movie?, or something, because these embarrassingly emotional/cheesy moments are only ever supported by those extremely pretty pictures, not by a actualized story that truly causes me to recollect these experiences like they might be mine, to experience Roma's REAL phenomena and imbibe her REAL impacts in her life, as does the ingenious literature of Marcel Proust, the homiest of homies. (Gimme that tea, baby!) Great art teaches you how to appreciate it, but this 'ish' be too boring and short for its own good and it's impacts are pithless, awkward and sudden. Kubrik does it better then Cuarón. Instead, I've been rudely tossed into a Mexican-themed time machine, and don't get me wrong, boy, I like time machines and Mexican history, but this time machine a'int even a DeLorean, people, but rather a confusing, nauesating washing machine that I've been crammed into with my cleaning lady, my expensive cleaning lady; dates a guy who, unabashedly, swings rebar around while naked, who rarely cleans, instead she just parents my kids, but whom I guess, I still dearly love despite the rosey fact, and don't get me wrong, Roma, but I'd fire your ass in an instant for leaving that dog poop around when I asked you to pick it up.I felt transported in time viewing Schindler's List, or Lincoln, or Amadeus, only those were DeLoreans and humbler films, in my humble, humble opinions. I did appreciate those moments of ultra-realistic, superb acting cleverly mixed with the matter-of-fact acting, as in the delivery scene (Sorry Roma) or the scene when the mom talks to Roma after 'driving' the car into the garage, (Us women are alone!) those were impactful, but mostly I felt more like I am walking through another highly superfluous, over-hyped, over-priced, racism/caste-themed museum with annoying Rotten Tomato Critics as curators, barking at me to not touch this or that, and to top it all off, Roma left nasty dog poop all over the place for us to step in. Gross! Fine. I do appreciate a few scenes, you got me, like the Doctor coming home in his car was masterful, like a Kubrick film, secretly finding the wedding ring in the drawer was remarkably tense for some subtle reason that I care not to put into words, also the water breaking scene is very intense, I felt like I was about to get shot in the dome, but I think that this whole Roma situation demands much more commitment on MY BEHALF for Cuarón's desired 'beach-scene' impact to ever work, and that scattered 'goofy' tone doesn't help me out. (I'm talking about the silly Sensei standing on one foot / rock & roll dudes.) I see you, Cuarón, but you don't see me. Make this a unique television series and build up to a beach-scene impact instead of just panicking and pushing the big red button, tossing me your beach scene like I'm some sort of dumb a$$. I was completely turned off by that beach scene and at that precise moment I knew I wasted my time, (don't hate me) as though I am not supposed to anticipate those kids being taken away by the rip-tide and myself expected to be orgasmically carried away by the stunning visuals, but you are just sentimental, Cuarón, nobody would ever say what Roma said after saving those kids, its so unrealistic and in my humble opinion, rushed! "I didn't want to have the baby." Is Roma completely air headed? She almost had these two kids DROWN on her watch, why is she randomly talking about her failed pregnancy at that moment. asgnjksagjnianejgio;hjnaegnkia blehhhh!!!!! Roma can't swim to save her own life, like watching a soggy piece of paper trying to save these kids. GET IN THE WATER FOR GOD'S SAKES. RUN! BREAST STROKE!! WTF?! That was all I could think about. Over all, Roma is nothing new, un-impactful, frustrating and does not fully trigger my mnemonic processes, save for perhaps that rich house party scene, it is unsuccessful in the way that it tries so very hard to be. Everything misses for me, the dogs head on the wall seemed random to me, even the intellectually dazzling final cut away scene when she walks up the stairs, although a brilliant way to say goodbye to Roma, guided by metal into a previously soapy sky, it is, once again, too unsupported, save for recalling the very first scene where I'm supposed to say "Now I am no longer looking at a dogshit stained reflection, but at an infinite sky, full of potential." Sigghhh.

    I'd give it a 75 %, fresh tomato. It's disappointingly decent. Not at all my favorite film and I won't be deceived by its praise. A masterpiece? Naahhhh, not in my eyes. A Netflix masterpiece, sure. It falls short. In my humble, humble, humble opinions, it's a shock-value story with some astonishing visuals that may force me to re-watch Roma, but I got some bones to pick, 'ight?. K, I give it 3 1/2 stars instead of 2 1/2 because of the way it looks, great casting and its undeniable coolness to watch, HOW-F'ING-EVER, this movie IS the quintessential limitations of a lazy, empathy-addicted, two-hour-long-movie-addicted culture, and I believe Roma's life, probably, deserves much more attention and time on my behalf, in order to work. Roma could easily be used as a lesson against rushed art. Roma should be used for discovering the potential of, perhaps, a 6 hour long movie?, or something, because these embarrassingly emotional/cheesy moments are only ever supported by those extremely pretty pictures, not by a actualized story that truly causes me to recollect these experiences like they might be mine, to experience Roma's REAL phenomena and imbibe her REAL impacts in her life, as does the ingenious literature of Marcel Proust, the homiest of homies. (Gimme that tea, baby!) Great art teaches you how to appreciate it, but this 'ish' be too boring and short for its own good and it's impacts are pithless, awkward and sudden. Kubrik does it better then Cuarón. Instead, I've been rudely tossed into a Mexican-themed time machine, and don't get me wrong, boy, I like time machines and Mexican history, but this time machine a'int even a DeLorean, people, but rather a confusing, nauesating washing machine that I've been crammed into with my cleaning lady, my expensive cleaning lady; dates a guy who, unabashedly, swings rebar around while naked, who rarely cleans, instead she just parents my kids, but whom I guess, I still dearly love despite the rosey fact, and don't get me wrong, Roma, but I'd fire your ass in an instant for leaving that dog poop around when I asked you to pick it up.I felt transported in time viewing Schindler's List, or Lincoln, or Amadeus, only those were DeLoreans and humbler films, in my humble, humble opinions. I did appreciate those moments of ultra-realistic, superb acting cleverly mixed with the matter-of-fact acting, as in the delivery scene (Sorry Roma) or the scene when the mom talks to Roma after 'driving' the car into the garage, (Us women are alone!) those were impactful, but mostly I felt more like I am walking through another highly superfluous, over-hyped, over-priced, racism/caste-themed museum with annoying Rotten Tomato Critics as curators, barking at me to not touch this or that, and to top it all off, Roma left nasty dog poop all over the place for us to step in. Gross! Fine. I do appreciate a few scenes, you got me, like the Doctor coming home in his car was masterful, like a Kubrick film, secretly finding the wedding ring in the drawer was remarkably tense for some subtle reason that I care not to put into words, also the water breaking scene is very intense, I felt like I was about to get shot in the dome, but I think that this whole Roma situation demands much more commitment on MY BEHALF for Cuarón's desired 'beach-scene' impact to ever work, and that scattered 'goofy' tone doesn't help me out. (I'm talking about the silly Sensei standing on one foot / rock & roll dudes.) I see you, Cuarón, but you don't see me. Make this a unique television series and build up to a beach-scene impact instead of just panicking and pushing the big red button, tossing me your beach scene like I'm some sort of dumb a$$. I was completely turned off by that beach scene and at that precise moment I knew I wasted my time, (don't hate me) as though I am not supposed to anticipate those kids being taken away by the rip-tide and myself expected to be orgasmically carried away by the stunning visuals, but you are just sentimental, Cuarón, nobody would ever say what Roma said after saving those kids, its so unrealistic and in my humble opinion, rushed! "I didn't want to have the baby." Is Roma completely air headed? She almost had these two kids DROWN on her watch, why is she randomly talking about her failed pregnancy at that moment. asgnjksagjnianejgio;hjnaegnkia blehhhh!!!!! Roma can't swim to save her own life, like watching a soggy piece of paper trying to save these kids. GET IN THE WATER FOR GOD'S SAKES. RUN! BREAST STROKE!! WTF?! That was all I could think about. Over all, Roma is nothing new, un-impactful, frustrating and does not fully trigger my mnemonic processes, save for perhaps that rich house party scene, it is unsuccessful in the way that it tries so very hard to be. Everything misses for me, the dogs head on the wall seemed random to me, even the intellectually dazzling final cut away scene when she walks up the stairs, although a brilliant way to say goodbye to Roma, guided by metal into a previously soapy sky, it is, once again, too unsupported, save for recalling the very first scene where I'm supposed to say "Now I am no longer looking at a dogshit stained reflection, but at an infinite sky, full of potential." Sigghhh.

  • Jun 24, 2019

    Nothing happens in the first hour 1/2 of the movie. It's truly horrible, and slow as molasses. Watch the last 45minutes if you must, but I'd rather watch paint dry.

    Nothing happens in the first hour 1/2 of the movie. It's truly horrible, and slow as molasses. Watch the last 45minutes if you must, but I'd rather watch paint dry.

  • Jun 20, 2019

    Any critic who raved about this movie is a one star critic and should be fired immediately. One or two artistic scenes does not make a movie. A real piece of garbage. A complete snore fest!

    Any critic who raved about this movie is a one star critic and should be fired immediately. One or two artistic scenes does not make a movie. A real piece of garbage. A complete snore fest!

  • Jun 18, 2019

    If Trump wasn't president this movie would be laughed at and mocked. After this POS, the director should be cleaning up houses and picking up dog shit.

    If Trump wasn't president this movie would be laughed at and mocked. After this POS, the director should be cleaning up houses and picking up dog shit.

  • Jun 17, 2019

    In specific scenes, there are perfect soundmarks with a story that gives a special distinction like the sound of the balloons, the sound of the man who sharpens knives, and the sound of the garbage truck passing by. This strategy employing sound effects and music allows Cuaron to immerse his audience in his own memories of Mexico. One scene that involves the audience immediately is when Cleo is walking near the sea with the family with whom she is employed. The wind, waves, birds, and people all make distinct sounds that permit the viewer to imagine exactly what it would be like standing there on the beach. Cuaron gives an incredible realism of every scene in the film by using sounds from his own childhood. Cuaron presents Roma as a magnificent and pure piece using contemporary black and white imagery to explain perfectly how Mexico was in the '70s in their most beautiful expression. Roma has a particular way of narration that impressed the audience from beginning to end. Giving a special touch of beauty of every scene to get the message of the film. For example, in the last scene when all the family comes together for a hug with Cleo, a simple housekeeper, they realize what the meaning of family is for them. That scene pictures in black and white give a methodical approach permitting the audience to appreciate its beauty working emotionally too.

    In specific scenes, there are perfect soundmarks with a story that gives a special distinction like the sound of the balloons, the sound of the man who sharpens knives, and the sound of the garbage truck passing by. This strategy employing sound effects and music allows Cuaron to immerse his audience in his own memories of Mexico. One scene that involves the audience immediately is when Cleo is walking near the sea with the family with whom she is employed. The wind, waves, birds, and people all make distinct sounds that permit the viewer to imagine exactly what it would be like standing there on the beach. Cuaron gives an incredible realism of every scene in the film by using sounds from his own childhood. Cuaron presents Roma as a magnificent and pure piece using contemporary black and white imagery to explain perfectly how Mexico was in the '70s in their most beautiful expression. Roma has a particular way of narration that impressed the audience from beginning to end. Giving a special touch of beauty of every scene to get the message of the film. For example, in the last scene when all the family comes together for a hug with Cleo, a simple housekeeper, they realize what the meaning of family is for them. That scene pictures in black and white give a methodical approach permitting the audience to appreciate its beauty working emotionally too.

  • Jun 11, 2019

    Slow, not interesting, waste of time.

    Slow, not interesting, waste of time.