Reviews

  • Apr 09, 2022

    The worst acting ever!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    The worst acting ever!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Mar 17, 2022

    It's easy to forget that at one time, before the controversies of paternity and politics, Jon Voight was considered one of, if not the, greatest actors in the world. The same can be said for Eric Roberts in the era before he was in a movie every single week. Runaway Train is a reminder that just how powerful both men can be. It's also a remembrance that Cannon wasn't just the studio of ninjas and Norris. The script came from director Djordje Milicevic, Paul Zindel and Edward Bunker and it was based on an original screenplay by Akira Kurosawa (who worked on it with Hideo Oguni and Ryuzo Kikushima). That's a real pedigree for any movie, much less one that was produced by Golan and Globus. Kurosawa had read an article in Life magazine about a runaway train and worked up his original script, which he intended to make in 1966 for Embassy Pictures in America, but the money kept falling through and he moved on to make Tora! Tora! Tora! Fifteen years later, the Nippon Herald company owned that script and decided to get it made. They asked Francis Ford Coppola to recommend a director and he suggested Andrei Konchalovsky. Konchalovsky had made Maria's Lovers already for Cannon (he'd also make Duet for One and Shy People for Golan and Globus) and he was able to get the studio on board, as well as Voight, who had aided him in receiving his first U. S. work visa. The result? A Cannon film nominated for three Oscars: Best Film Editing, Best Supporting Actor for Roberts and Best Actor for Voight. Oscar "Manny" Manheim (Voight) is a hero to the men of Alaska's Stonehaven Maximum Security Prison. He's almost escaped numerous times and a three-year bid in solitary hasn't dulled his edge or need to be free. After a court order gets him back in general population, he's targeted by the warden (John P. Ryan, who is also in Cannon's Avenging Force, Death Wish 4: The Crackdown and Delta Force 2: The Colombian Connection). There's an incredible scene set during a boxing match - look for a young Danny Trejo* - when another prisoner tries to stab Manheim under orders. Even as he's knifed and sliced through his hand, Manheim is a feral animal, walking through the gunfire of the guards and demanding that his would-be killer keep coming after him. All of this means that his next escape plan needs to happen now. He works with Buck McGeehy (Roberts) to scale the wall, run through the snow, swim across a frozen river and take a train across the country to freedom. If only it were that simple. What follows is a train - and Manny - out of control, roaring into the snow-strewn world with the cry of a feral beast, challenging man, nature, machine and fate as the convict would rather choose the victory of death than the defeat of being held within prison walls. I was struck by the final shot as he stands atop the ruined lead engine, arms outstretched and howling at destiny. Rebecca De Mornay is also great in this as Sara, one of the few crew members on the train and an example of humanity in the midst of all this rage. Runaway Train is probably the best film that ever came out of Cannon, if not the most successful at the box office. It never lets up and makes you believe and care about its leads unlike any movie I've seen in years. I can only imagine how excited Golan and Globus were to, if only fleetingly, be the producers of a movie that people took seriously. *Trejo was the Narcotics Anonymous sponsor of one of the production assistants on this movie. He was visiting that person when he was offered a job as an extra. Edward Bunker, who wrote Straight Time and Animal Factory - as well as this film - had been in San Quentin with Trejo and got him hired as Roberts' boxing coach. Konchalovskiy was so impressed with Trejo that he gave him his role. Trejo would later say that he was amazed to earn $320 a day, more than any crime had ever made him.

    It's easy to forget that at one time, before the controversies of paternity and politics, Jon Voight was considered one of, if not the, greatest actors in the world. The same can be said for Eric Roberts in the era before he was in a movie every single week. Runaway Train is a reminder that just how powerful both men can be. It's also a remembrance that Cannon wasn't just the studio of ninjas and Norris. The script came from director Djordje Milicevic, Paul Zindel and Edward Bunker and it was based on an original screenplay by Akira Kurosawa (who worked on it with Hideo Oguni and Ryuzo Kikushima). That's a real pedigree for any movie, much less one that was produced by Golan and Globus. Kurosawa had read an article in Life magazine about a runaway train and worked up his original script, which he intended to make in 1966 for Embassy Pictures in America, but the money kept falling through and he moved on to make Tora! Tora! Tora! Fifteen years later, the Nippon Herald company owned that script and decided to get it made. They asked Francis Ford Coppola to recommend a director and he suggested Andrei Konchalovsky. Konchalovsky had made Maria's Lovers already for Cannon (he'd also make Duet for One and Shy People for Golan and Globus) and he was able to get the studio on board, as well as Voight, who had aided him in receiving his first U. S. work visa. The result? A Cannon film nominated for three Oscars: Best Film Editing, Best Supporting Actor for Roberts and Best Actor for Voight. Oscar "Manny" Manheim (Voight) is a hero to the men of Alaska's Stonehaven Maximum Security Prison. He's almost escaped numerous times and a three-year bid in solitary hasn't dulled his edge or need to be free. After a court order gets him back in general population, he's targeted by the warden (John P. Ryan, who is also in Cannon's Avenging Force, Death Wish 4: The Crackdown and Delta Force 2: The Colombian Connection). There's an incredible scene set during a boxing match - look for a young Danny Trejo* - when another prisoner tries to stab Manheim under orders. Even as he's knifed and sliced through his hand, Manheim is a feral animal, walking through the gunfire of the guards and demanding that his would-be killer keep coming after him. All of this means that his next escape plan needs to happen now. He works with Buck McGeehy (Roberts) to scale the wall, run through the snow, swim across a frozen river and take a train across the country to freedom. If only it were that simple. What follows is a train - and Manny - out of control, roaring into the snow-strewn world with the cry of a feral beast, challenging man, nature, machine and fate as the convict would rather choose the victory of death than the defeat of being held within prison walls. I was struck by the final shot as he stands atop the ruined lead engine, arms outstretched and howling at destiny. Rebecca De Mornay is also great in this as Sara, one of the few crew members on the train and an example of humanity in the midst of all this rage. Runaway Train is probably the best film that ever came out of Cannon, if not the most successful at the box office. It never lets up and makes you believe and care about its leads unlike any movie I've seen in years. I can only imagine how excited Golan and Globus were to, if only fleetingly, be the producers of a movie that people took seriously. *Trejo was the Narcotics Anonymous sponsor of one of the production assistants on this movie. He was visiting that person when he was offered a job as an extra. Edward Bunker, who wrote Straight Time and Animal Factory - as well as this film - had been in San Quentin with Trejo and got him hired as Roberts' boxing coach. Konchalovskiy was so impressed with Trejo that he gave him his role. Trejo would later say that he was amazed to earn $320 a day, more than any crime had ever made him.

  • Feb 25, 2022

    Between 2.5 and 3 stars. It tries to be an intelligent thriller, but it is not so astounding.

    Between 2.5 and 3 stars. It tries to be an intelligent thriller, but it is not so astounding.

  • Feb 12, 2022

    This is Jon Voight at his absolute best and this s hands down one of the most under-appreciated movie gems you will ever see.

    This is Jon Voight at his absolute best and this s hands down one of the most under-appreciated movie gems you will ever see.

  • Feb 12, 2022

    The film's gritty action scenes on-board the Runaway Train are well crafted and exciting plus, the stunts are sensational and the ending is thrilling. But the separate story threads taking place in a prison and also in a railway dispatch center are merely perfunctory. As for the performances: Roberts is typically annoying, and De Mornay's character is frankly pointless. Also, although Voight is powerful in many of his scenes, he's over-the-top in others. His characterization may be atypical to his other roles, but that doesn't automatically make it good. On the other hand, the reliable Ryan appears to be having a lot of fun in his villainous role as the obsessed prison warden. However, the most impressive star-turn in the film is that fearsomely massive locomotive uncontrollably hurtling through the raw Alaskan wilderness. The train trip alone is worth the ride!

    The film's gritty action scenes on-board the Runaway Train are well crafted and exciting plus, the stunts are sensational and the ending is thrilling. But the separate story threads taking place in a prison and also in a railway dispatch center are merely perfunctory. As for the performances: Roberts is typically annoying, and De Mornay's character is frankly pointless. Also, although Voight is powerful in many of his scenes, he's over-the-top in others. His characterization may be atypical to his other roles, but that doesn't automatically make it good. On the other hand, the reliable Ryan appears to be having a lot of fun in his villainous role as the obsessed prison warden. However, the most impressive star-turn in the film is that fearsomely massive locomotive uncontrollably hurtling through the raw Alaskan wilderness. The train trip alone is worth the ride!

  • Feb 09, 2022

    When two convicts (Jon Voight, Eric Roberts) escape a maximum-security prison, they board a train and quickly discover that it is barreling out of control through a frozen Alaskan landscape. While the premise is interesting and there are some compelling scenarios faced by the characters, the movie ultimately fails under the weight of its own excesses, which include overwrought performances (yelling constantly does not a good performance make), some ludicrous and laughable dialogue, and the pointless appearance of a stowaway on the train (Rebecca De Mornay), whose character serves no purpose other than to bat her baby blue eyes in times of stress.

    When two convicts (Jon Voight, Eric Roberts) escape a maximum-security prison, they board a train and quickly discover that it is barreling out of control through a frozen Alaskan landscape. While the premise is interesting and there are some compelling scenarios faced by the characters, the movie ultimately fails under the weight of its own excesses, which include overwrought performances (yelling constantly does not a good performance make), some ludicrous and laughable dialogue, and the pointless appearance of a stowaway on the train (Rebecca De Mornay), whose character serves no purpose other than to bat her baby blue eyes in times of stress.

  • Jan 14, 2022

    It goes and goes on and on and you just feel more and more tension. A great movie with great characters that you do care about.

    It goes and goes on and on and you just feel more and more tension. A great movie with great characters that you do care about.

  • Jan 07, 2022

    Fun ride from beginning to end.Dealing with dark,and contrasting themes works well here. The Train is the star,and steals every scene its in.Voight,and Roberts are great together,and the ending makes the film.

    Fun ride from beginning to end.Dealing with dark,and contrasting themes works well here. The Train is the star,and steals every scene its in.Voight,and Roberts are great together,and the ending makes the film.

  • Oct 16, 2021

    Runaway Train could have been a top classic action thriller if only several of the characters weren't so exaggerated and shamed by poor dialogue and overacting. Leading actor Jon Voight is basically credible, convincing and very different as a hardcore convict escapist, but his companion, played by Eric Roberts, is many times over the top, and gets annoying. It's hard to realize that both got Oscar nominations for their roles, but Voight winning a Golden Globe for best male actor is probably deserved. Still, the film as a total is nowhere close, and such nominations says a lot about the level in motion pictures in the mid 1980's. Several of the railway office personnel characters are on the verge of parodic and at least one even just silly, Without any other obvious intension than to create some of the turns in the plot, the characters are made little trustworthy. Pathetic acting and annoying performances are just unessesary, and one of the major dowturns in the film. However, there's enough action scenes and dangerous stunts happening on a fast running train in winter landscape to satisfy most fans of the genre.

    Runaway Train could have been a top classic action thriller if only several of the characters weren't so exaggerated and shamed by poor dialogue and overacting. Leading actor Jon Voight is basically credible, convincing and very different as a hardcore convict escapist, but his companion, played by Eric Roberts, is many times over the top, and gets annoying. It's hard to realize that both got Oscar nominations for their roles, but Voight winning a Golden Globe for best male actor is probably deserved. Still, the film as a total is nowhere close, and such nominations says a lot about the level in motion pictures in the mid 1980's. Several of the railway office personnel characters are on the verge of parodic and at least one even just silly, Without any other obvious intension than to create some of the turns in the plot, the characters are made little trustworthy. Pathetic acting and annoying performances are just unessesary, and one of the major dowturns in the film. However, there's enough action scenes and dangerous stunts happening on a fast running train in winter landscape to satisfy most fans of the genre.

  • Aug 19, 2021

    A great train out of control is a very good if dated Movie!!!

    A great train out of control is a very good if dated Movie!!!