Runaway Train Reviews

  • Dec 06, 2020

    Based on a story by the legendary Akira Kurosawa and directed by Andrei Konchalovsk. Jon Voight, Eric Roberts, and Rebecca DeMornay star in a high speed thriller along the likes of 'Speed' and 'Unstoppable'. In an Alaskan prison called Stone Haven two convicts Manny and Buck are eager to escape. Once they do they board a train hoping to make it scott-free. What they didn't count on what the locomotive having no conductor and it's speeding out of control. So the train is literally a runaway much like them. Manny wishes he could be reformed and he wants Bucky to do the same. Neither of them are sure what to do with their freedom at the moment. A woman named Sara gets caught up in the escapade played by Rebecca DeMornay. She serves as the voice of reason asking these two to work together. Next to that the warden of the prison is hot on their trail but wants to bring them back dead or alive otherwise the prison will be in riot. After all Manny was an idol back in the slammer. The Alaskan setting I like a lot giving you that searing feeling of the cold. You can almost feel the frostbite. The movie has the advantage of constantly moving at break speed so to speak. Exceptional performances by the three leads. It's also very bloody which I was surprised to see. Im pretty amazed how the powerful the music was as well as the ending. Is freedom on the run better than being locked up or dying free? Winning or losing, it's hard to tell the difference. We can act brave but maybe it's only to save face. Despite some implausibilities and logistical issues and some lack of common sense which is funny at times the movie is still intelligent enough to keep you glued to the screen. It's all the characters you see that you care about testing their bravery and redemption. poses some interesting questions about life and humanity, which explore ideas proposed by William Shakespeare to illustrate the thematic concepts. These moments are when Kurosawa's influence really shines. The central characters are animals in many ways, but they aren't without their moments of pity either. Sadly it's another one of those movies that got overlooked in the shuffle but it really needs some reappraisal today because of its exploration of the human condition and the thrilling set pieces.

    Based on a story by the legendary Akira Kurosawa and directed by Andrei Konchalovsk. Jon Voight, Eric Roberts, and Rebecca DeMornay star in a high speed thriller along the likes of 'Speed' and 'Unstoppable'. In an Alaskan prison called Stone Haven two convicts Manny and Buck are eager to escape. Once they do they board a train hoping to make it scott-free. What they didn't count on what the locomotive having no conductor and it's speeding out of control. So the train is literally a runaway much like them. Manny wishes he could be reformed and he wants Bucky to do the same. Neither of them are sure what to do with their freedom at the moment. A woman named Sara gets caught up in the escapade played by Rebecca DeMornay. She serves as the voice of reason asking these two to work together. Next to that the warden of the prison is hot on their trail but wants to bring them back dead or alive otherwise the prison will be in riot. After all Manny was an idol back in the slammer. The Alaskan setting I like a lot giving you that searing feeling of the cold. You can almost feel the frostbite. The movie has the advantage of constantly moving at break speed so to speak. Exceptional performances by the three leads. It's also very bloody which I was surprised to see. Im pretty amazed how the powerful the music was as well as the ending. Is freedom on the run better than being locked up or dying free? Winning or losing, it's hard to tell the difference. We can act brave but maybe it's only to save face. Despite some implausibilities and logistical issues and some lack of common sense which is funny at times the movie is still intelligent enough to keep you glued to the screen. It's all the characters you see that you care about testing their bravery and redemption. poses some interesting questions about life and humanity, which explore ideas proposed by William Shakespeare to illustrate the thematic concepts. These moments are when Kurosawa's influence really shines. The central characters are animals in many ways, but they aren't without their moments of pity either. Sadly it's another one of those movies that got overlooked in the shuffle but it really needs some reappraisal today because of its exploration of the human condition and the thrilling set pieces.

  • Jul 24, 2020

    Words cannot describe how bad Runaway Train is. Absurd overacting by everyone that would make Nicolas Cage's worst moments look like nuanced art: WHY IS EVERYONE SHOUTING EVERY LINE HERE? The so called philosophical threads were utter garbage. I had to fast forward through half of it. With characters we have no need to care for, the only decent thing about this movie is the scenery. I would rather have watched the train movie through icy Alaska alone than suffered the horrific acting and bland story on display here.

    Words cannot describe how bad Runaway Train is. Absurd overacting by everyone that would make Nicolas Cage's worst moments look like nuanced art: WHY IS EVERYONE SHOUTING EVERY LINE HERE? The so called philosophical threads were utter garbage. I had to fast forward through half of it. With characters we have no need to care for, the only decent thing about this movie is the scenery. I would rather have watched the train movie through icy Alaska alone than suffered the horrific acting and bland story on display here.

  • Jul 13, 2020

    The acting is of note the rest isn't.

    The acting is of note the rest isn't.

  • May 27, 2020

    A simple premise elevated by compelling performances from Voight and Roberts, playing 2 fully realized characters in a dangerous predicament that forces them to come to terms with their mortality, face their demons head on, and face potential death no matter how difficult it may be. Runaway Train is a film that gets better as it progresses, both in terms of entertainment and character development. The initial half hour in the prison prior to the escape and 'runaway train' situation is nowhere near as engaging, so perhaps a good 10 or 15 minutes could've been shaved off to make the film a little more well-rounded and condensed. Still, this is a very good film overall that deserves more attention.

    A simple premise elevated by compelling performances from Voight and Roberts, playing 2 fully realized characters in a dangerous predicament that forces them to come to terms with their mortality, face their demons head on, and face potential death no matter how difficult it may be. Runaway Train is a film that gets better as it progresses, both in terms of entertainment and character development. The initial half hour in the prison prior to the escape and 'runaway train' situation is nowhere near as engaging, so perhaps a good 10 or 15 minutes could've been shaved off to make the film a little more well-rounded and condensed. Still, this is a very good film overall that deserves more attention.

  • May 13, 2020

    Runaway Train-Kurosawa>Voight>Roberts, that is a truly a unique combination of ‘talent'. I am certain this movie is the only time these three are mentioned in the same breath. The world building by director Andrei Konchalovsky in the first 15 minutes of this movie is fantastic. The creation of this dystopian like prison in Alaska, with the truly maniacal prison warden, immediately dropped you in world that was both brutal and energizing. Fast forward to the ending which hits a pitch perfect note of defiance and beauty culminating in one of my favorite final shots of all time. Problem is the 125minutes in-between. Kurosawa's screenplay was certainly altered but one can see the moral dramatic interplay that was to be the bulk of this stuck on a runaway train movie. Unfortunately, this movie contains some of the worst acting I've ever seen. Roberts is beyond overacting almost to the point that one feels he is actually doing some sort of meta reference, but I can't give him that much credit to be honest. Partly because DeMornay is even worst, so if we are giving any camp awards out she has to win. Voight is so far over the top also, but somehow almost believable. Danny Trejo's first role is a distinct plus, and some of the side characters are amusing. Almost hooked me but there was too much to overlook to go all in on this movie. a generous B-

    Runaway Train-Kurosawa>Voight>Roberts, that is a truly a unique combination of ‘talent'. I am certain this movie is the only time these three are mentioned in the same breath. The world building by director Andrei Konchalovsky in the first 15 minutes of this movie is fantastic. The creation of this dystopian like prison in Alaska, with the truly maniacal prison warden, immediately dropped you in world that was both brutal and energizing. Fast forward to the ending which hits a pitch perfect note of defiance and beauty culminating in one of my favorite final shots of all time. Problem is the 125minutes in-between. Kurosawa's screenplay was certainly altered but one can see the moral dramatic interplay that was to be the bulk of this stuck on a runaway train movie. Unfortunately, this movie contains some of the worst acting I've ever seen. Roberts is beyond overacting almost to the point that one feels he is actually doing some sort of meta reference, but I can't give him that much credit to be honest. Partly because DeMornay is even worst, so if we are giving any camp awards out she has to win. Voight is so far over the top also, but somehow almost believable. Danny Trejo's first role is a distinct plus, and some of the side characters are amusing. Almost hooked me but there was too much to overlook to go all in on this movie. a generous B-

  • Apr 23, 2020

    There's an unsaid rule in film making- show a gun in a movie and you have to use the gun in the movie. A runaway train without show the train wreck or it being stopped?? What a letdown. This film had lots of potential but the film makers decided to save move and take shortcuts in the writing.

    There's an unsaid rule in film making- show a gun in a movie and you have to use the gun in the movie. A runaway train without show the train wreck or it being stopped?? What a letdown. This film had lots of potential but the film makers decided to save move and take shortcuts in the writing.

  • Feb 06, 2020

    A hidden gem action/thriller from 1985. The acting, cinematography, sound and editing are great.

    A hidden gem action/thriller from 1985. The acting, cinematography, sound and editing are great.

  • Nov 26, 2019

    Amazing film, one of those that from time to time you want to watch again.

    Amazing film, one of those that from time to time you want to watch again.

  • Oct 22, 2019

    Propelled by a combustible pair of machismo performances, the film barrels relentlessly along its straightforward plot and spare setting toward some vaguely Nietzschean (who Voight quotes in one scene) point: "Hold me, I don't want to die alone," a character caught up in the chaos cries, to which Voight's escaped con growls back, "we all die alone!"—and when she calls him an animal, he snorts in turn, "no, worse: Human!"

    Propelled by a combustible pair of machismo performances, the film barrels relentlessly along its straightforward plot and spare setting toward some vaguely Nietzschean (who Voight quotes in one scene) point: "Hold me, I don't want to die alone," a character caught up in the chaos cries, to which Voight's escaped con growls back, "we all die alone!"—and when she calls him an animal, he snorts in turn, "no, worse: Human!"

  • Kevin M. W Super Reviewer
    Sep 28, 2019

    Jon Voight as a tough-as-nails blue collar convict up against one hell of a spiteful warden (John P.Ryan). Somehow he gets saddled with new-con-on-the-cellblock Eric Roberts (in what has to be the movie gold standard 'annoying character') and together they endeavor to escape. Watch it simply for the pleasure of watching Voight growl at Roberts continually.

    Jon Voight as a tough-as-nails blue collar convict up against one hell of a spiteful warden (John P.Ryan). Somehow he gets saddled with new-con-on-the-cellblock Eric Roberts (in what has to be the movie gold standard 'annoying character') and together they endeavor to escape. Watch it simply for the pleasure of watching Voight growl at Roberts continually.