Sugata Sanshiro (Judo Saga) (Judo Story) Reviews

  • Sep 16, 2018

    A (almost) sports film with uncommon grace and a full, proud heart and an eye for the things that move and astound.

    A (almost) sports film with uncommon grace and a full, proud heart and an eye for the things that move and astound.

  • Sep 09, 2018

    Somewhat bland for Kurosawa but not bad at all. He seems to be developing some styles here that are in their very early stages which is interesting to see. It's a filmmaker playing around for the most part and while some of it is meandering and confusing, there are also moments of pure astonishment and atmospheric beauty. It's also hard to criticize when 1800 feet of film has been cut out by the government with no consent from Kurosawa and is forever gone so...

    Somewhat bland for Kurosawa but not bad at all. He seems to be developing some styles here that are in their very early stages which is interesting to see. It's a filmmaker playing around for the most part and while some of it is meandering and confusing, there are also moments of pure astonishment and atmospheric beauty. It's also hard to criticize when 1800 feet of film has been cut out by the government with no consent from Kurosawa and is forever gone so...

  • Sep 04, 2015

    Kurosawa's first is a minor work compared to his later masterpieces. Repeat viewings however reveal a likeable and endearing film about a country bumpkin who realizes his strength and spiritual growth through Judo. At first he's all strength, so much so, his instructor detests him to the point of calling him a useless bully. He's never a bully despite a scene in which he appears to be randomly fighting strangers on the streets. When his instructor says he lacks the spirituality to continue with judo, he all of a sudden jumps into a pond determined to die there if necessary. He stays there over a day until a blossoming lotus flower gives him sudden insight. He jumps out a changed man, with newfound humility. Eventually he excels so much at judo that children follow him around singing about him like a folk hero. But this notoriety attracts a nefarious character who is determined to humiliate him in a fight. Sanshiro however, never loses his cool or his humility. And if you've ever seen Kurosawa's masterpiece Ran, you know clouds feature prominently in that film. Clouds are important to Sanshiro Sugata as well.

    Kurosawa's first is a minor work compared to his later masterpieces. Repeat viewings however reveal a likeable and endearing film about a country bumpkin who realizes his strength and spiritual growth through Judo. At first he's all strength, so much so, his instructor detests him to the point of calling him a useless bully. He's never a bully despite a scene in which he appears to be randomly fighting strangers on the streets. When his instructor says he lacks the spirituality to continue with judo, he all of a sudden jumps into a pond determined to die there if necessary. He stays there over a day until a blossoming lotus flower gives him sudden insight. He jumps out a changed man, with newfound humility. Eventually he excels so much at judo that children follow him around singing about him like a folk hero. But this notoriety attracts a nefarious character who is determined to humiliate him in a fight. Sanshiro however, never loses his cool or his humility. And if you've ever seen Kurosawa's masterpiece Ran, you know clouds feature prominently in that film. Clouds are important to Sanshiro Sugata as well.

  • Mar 03, 2015

    Akira Kurosawa's debut film in 1943. The trials and tribulation of a young martial artist. The ultimate question, the argument that has spanned centuries in Martial Arts culture since its first incarnation, which style is better. American-Chinese martial art legend Bruce Lee in his later years of his life would depart himself from having a style, (using the term "No Way as Way" with his way of fighting Jeet-Kune-Do) because of the criticism and opposing styles of fighting loyalty and live or die dedication to a style of system that is so strict in an actual fight its movements are rendered useless. Black and white Japaneses film from highly respected director Akira Kurosawa who has inspired, George Lucas's Star Wars series and films by Steven Spielberg and Ford Coppola. Sanshiro Sugata is the first installment in The Judo Saga; this film centers around a young man traveling to a small town to learn Jujitsu but soon finds a new style that, in the film is more superior. He soon learns the style but has not conquered the mental state of mind. During the film while having a test of deadly dedication to his new style of fighting he confines himself in a muddy swamp were he get his first enlightenment by a beautiful flower growing near by him, teaching the beauty of life itself and that to push himself to death because he cant conquer Judo spirituality is not the answer, he has more trials for his art with love and at last the final battle; will he have what it takes to become the best? Still enjoyable considering it is a partially losted film and was made quite a long time ago any new fans to Kurosawa's film need to watch his first film, with noticeable limits on his production but his filmmaker talent fights through with ease, a good-old-classic.

    Akira Kurosawa's debut film in 1943. The trials and tribulation of a young martial artist. The ultimate question, the argument that has spanned centuries in Martial Arts culture since its first incarnation, which style is better. American-Chinese martial art legend Bruce Lee in his later years of his life would depart himself from having a style, (using the term "No Way as Way" with his way of fighting Jeet-Kune-Do) because of the criticism and opposing styles of fighting loyalty and live or die dedication to a style of system that is so strict in an actual fight its movements are rendered useless. Black and white Japaneses film from highly respected director Akira Kurosawa who has inspired, George Lucas's Star Wars series and films by Steven Spielberg and Ford Coppola. Sanshiro Sugata is the first installment in The Judo Saga; this film centers around a young man traveling to a small town to learn Jujitsu but soon finds a new style that, in the film is more superior. He soon learns the style but has not conquered the mental state of mind. During the film while having a test of deadly dedication to his new style of fighting he confines himself in a muddy swamp were he get his first enlightenment by a beautiful flower growing near by him, teaching the beauty of life itself and that to push himself to death because he cant conquer Judo spirituality is not the answer, he has more trials for his art with love and at last the final battle; will he have what it takes to become the best? Still enjoyable considering it is a partially losted film and was made quite a long time ago any new fans to Kurosawa's film need to watch his first film, with noticeable limits on his production but his filmmaker talent fights through with ease, a good-old-classic.

  • Dec 19, 2014

    It's Kurosawa's first movie and still really good.

    It's Kurosawa's first movie and still really good.

  • Jan 24, 2014

    The first act or so is a little shaky, and the cuts make the plot kinda confusing, but once you get the hang of what's happening it's quite enjoyable. You can see Kurosawa already has a pretty firm handle of how he wants to make movies. He makes the very un-cinematic martial art of jujitsu compelling to watch: the slowly-paced fight against the old man is lovely and sad, and the final fight in the grass is shockingly beautiful.

    The first act or so is a little shaky, and the cuts make the plot kinda confusing, but once you get the hang of what's happening it's quite enjoyable. You can see Kurosawa already has a pretty firm handle of how he wants to make movies. He makes the very un-cinematic martial art of jujitsu compelling to watch: the slowly-paced fight against the old man is lovely and sad, and the final fight in the grass is shockingly beautiful.

  • Dec 01, 2013

    As the directorial debut, this film is great. Then consider that that Kurosawa-san made this during WWII (all media was propaganda) and it seems astounding. The story makes the point that there is a difference between bullying strength and benevolent strength; sage wisdom in a time when the Japanese military expected to conquer and retain much of the Pacific rim.

    As the directorial debut, this film is great. Then consider that that Kurosawa-san made this during WWII (all media was propaganda) and it seems astounding. The story makes the point that there is a difference between bullying strength and benevolent strength; sage wisdom in a time when the Japanese military expected to conquer and retain much of the Pacific rim.

  • May 30, 2013

    Some scenes demonstrate Kurosawa's nascent cinematic brilliance, but overall the film was horrendously cut by film censors at the time and the result is confusing.

    Some scenes demonstrate Kurosawa's nascent cinematic brilliance, but overall the film was horrendously cut by film censors at the time and the result is confusing.

  • May 18, 2013

    Kurosawa's first film is a first-rate drama of when human emotion clashes with traditional Japanese values. Unfortunately, Japan's wartime government decided to censor 17 minutes out of this film. Those scenes are truly missed.

    Kurosawa's first film is a first-rate drama of when human emotion clashes with traditional Japanese values. Unfortunately, Japan's wartime government decided to censor 17 minutes out of this film. Those scenes are truly missed.

  • May 15, 2013

    ãÂ?ÂãÂ,Â"ï 1/4Â?

    ãÂ?ÂãÂ,Â"ï 1/4Â?