Reviews

  • 4d ago

    They really did me a disservice by playing that Stayin' Alive song right at the beginning of the movie. They knew full well how dang catchy it was. It clouded my judgment for the rest of the movie and I came away having thoroughly enjoyed watching it. My eyeballs absorbed the scenes of Travolta & co. being unabashedly racist, all the literal rape stuff and the unnecessary rudeness, but the entire time my brain was going ah, ha, ha, ha, stayin' alive, stayin' alive. Even writing this review I have to pause and let my inner voice finish the song's chorus so that I can get back to remembering how distasteful the actual storyline of the movie was, with Travolta's character not really redeemed by merely giving away the trophy that anyone could see he hadn't earned. I would liken this movie to a spaghetti whose noodles were distractingly undercooked, but whose sauce was good enough that I finished the meal and would happily eat it again.

    They really did me a disservice by playing that Stayin' Alive song right at the beginning of the movie. They knew full well how dang catchy it was. It clouded my judgment for the rest of the movie and I came away having thoroughly enjoyed watching it. My eyeballs absorbed the scenes of Travolta & co. being unabashedly racist, all the literal rape stuff and the unnecessary rudeness, but the entire time my brain was going ah, ha, ha, ha, stayin' alive, stayin' alive. Even writing this review I have to pause and let my inner voice finish the song's chorus so that I can get back to remembering how distasteful the actual storyline of the movie was, with Travolta's character not really redeemed by merely giving away the trophy that anyone could see he hadn't earned. I would liken this movie to a spaghetti whose noodles were distractingly undercooked, but whose sauce was good enough that I finished the meal and would happily eat it again.

  • Aug 16, 2021

    A brutally honest, obscenely real and disturbing look at life in 1970’s New York buoyed by an incredible performance by Travolta.

    A brutally honest, obscenely real and disturbing look at life in 1970’s New York buoyed by an incredible performance by Travolta.

  • Aug 06, 2021

    [----08/06/2021----]

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  • Scott
    Jul 07, 2021

    Great to have seen it again. Saw it in 1977. Awesome.

    Great to have seen it again. Saw it in 1977. Awesome.

  • Jul 04, 2021

    Saturday Night Fever is one of the most significant movies of the 1970's for many reasons. It is a look at "coming of age' in Brooklyn in the 1970's- at the age of the rise of the Disco Movement. Many people think of the movie as a simply a showcase for Disco music and dancing because the film exploded as a result of these two key elements, and caused an explosion of the Disco and club scene around the country. The film's title is loosely based on New York Magazine article about how Disco revelers were in a "fever" every Saturday night in NYC, which was only cured by hitting the dance clubs. The film made John Travolta an international superstar, and with good reason. He is terrific in this role. He is natural and funny and smoldering with sexual appeal. His dancing scenes are unmatched, even today. The film is not a dance movie. It is a film about family and life and coming of age disguised as a dance film. The film deals with issues of sexual awaking, suicide, family strife, and religious confusion. The film pinpoints that if you can find something you are passionate about in life you have the ability to transcend your circumstances, your social status, and your financial circumstances. In today's woke culture the film would likely be panned for its use of racially inventive language, its anti LGBTQ scenes, and its deeply evident misogyny. However, this movie is the 1970's in Brooklyn NYC. These elements depict elements of life, culture, and thought as they existed-without the whitewash of today's cleansing culture. What you see are real people, good but flawed, trying to figure it all out. Engaging, funny at times, and dramatic. Had The Bee Gees never done anything but written the amazing soundtrack for this they would be legends. The desire to capture the success of their music and this film, to some degree, killed the Disco era as people got tired of it. Look out for Fran Drescher about half way in. See this movie, or see this movie again. One Note- I know there is a whitewashed PG version of this film but this review is based on the original, uncut R rated version.

    Saturday Night Fever is one of the most significant movies of the 1970's for many reasons. It is a look at "coming of age' in Brooklyn in the 1970's- at the age of the rise of the Disco Movement. Many people think of the movie as a simply a showcase for Disco music and dancing because the film exploded as a result of these two key elements, and caused an explosion of the Disco and club scene around the country. The film's title is loosely based on New York Magazine article about how Disco revelers were in a "fever" every Saturday night in NYC, which was only cured by hitting the dance clubs. The film made John Travolta an international superstar, and with good reason. He is terrific in this role. He is natural and funny and smoldering with sexual appeal. His dancing scenes are unmatched, even today. The film is not a dance movie. It is a film about family and life and coming of age disguised as a dance film. The film deals with issues of sexual awaking, suicide, family strife, and religious confusion. The film pinpoints that if you can find something you are passionate about in life you have the ability to transcend your circumstances, your social status, and your financial circumstances. In today's woke culture the film would likely be panned for its use of racially inventive language, its anti LGBTQ scenes, and its deeply evident misogyny. However, this movie is the 1970's in Brooklyn NYC. These elements depict elements of life, culture, and thought as they existed-without the whitewash of today's cleansing culture. What you see are real people, good but flawed, trying to figure it all out. Engaging, funny at times, and dramatic. Had The Bee Gees never done anything but written the amazing soundtrack for this they would be legends. The desire to capture the success of their music and this film, to some degree, killed the Disco era as people got tired of it. Look out for Fran Drescher about half way in. See this movie, or see this movie again. One Note- I know there is a whitewashed PG version of this film but this review is based on the original, uncut R rated version.

  • Apr 19, 2021

    What a horrible film this was, I use to go to the bars when they played disco music but nobody ever danced like this, John Ravolta can not dance and everything was so cut and dried and formula that I laughed at this movie as I fast forwarded it and the music was so bad and blaring and I hated every song they played, I guess this Movie was considered great when it came out but it shows it's dated now!!!

    What a horrible film this was, I use to go to the bars when they played disco music but nobody ever danced like this, John Ravolta can not dance and everything was so cut and dried and formula that I laughed at this movie as I fast forwarded it and the music was so bad and blaring and I hated every song they played, I guess this Movie was considered great when it came out but it shows it's dated now!!!

  • Mar 25, 2021

    Saturday night fever is a high energy jukebox film where some of the on screen action is in sync with the music. The soundtrack is a famous score with a high percentage of the songs performed or written by The Bee Gees. Saturday Night Fever was filmed and is set during the late 1970's  when disco music was hitting the peak of mainstream popularity and bell bottoms were the height of fashion. Be aware, however,  this is not just a film about disco music and great group dance routines, it is a dark gritty coming of age drama that has the music and dancing as the escape from the pressures and problems of everyday life. The film centres on 19year old Tony Manero ( John Travolta ) living uncomfortably at home in Brooklyn with his large Italian-American family. He works weekdays in a dead end job and lives for the weekends when he can hang out with his like minded friends. Tony's escape comes in the form of a disco club called 2001 Odyssey where he is a well known figure and his dance moves elevate him to star like status. It is at the club he meets Stephanie who has plans to move to Manhattan away from the dull , working class Brooklyn to better her life. The film culminates in a  number of low points for Tony and a tragic event that forces him to decide wether or not to turn his back on his current way of life in search of something better. This film currently has three versions circulating on DVD and BLU RAY and depending on which you watch they will give the viewer a completely different experience. The most well known version is the high edited PG version. This is the version that is shown on terrestrial T.V. and was the second version to get a cinematic release due to the hype and mass popularity of the music and dance routines in the original R rated film. This version is quite disjointed and misses crucial points of the story solely concentrating more on the music and dance. The now more available to buy and rent version is the original cinematic release 18 or R rated version that is littered with sexual references , nudity , fighting, sex scenes and bad language . This is the gritty coming of age story that the music and dance although important is secondary and a great improvement on the PG version ,the main criticism is that some of the character development is a bit thin and we don't really get to know any other characters other than Tony and Stephanie. The final version is the directors cut , which has more character development and really centres on the deprivation and tough life in the Brooklyn suburbs compared to the dreams and aspirations that Stephanie wants to achieve across the bridge in Manhattan. Saturday night Fever is not a cheesy dance flick that the PG rating version had it become, it is a well told drama that  despite some 1970's  rather colourful language and uncomfortable actions still holds up really well today.

    Saturday night fever is a high energy jukebox film where some of the on screen action is in sync with the music. The soundtrack is a famous score with a high percentage of the songs performed or written by The Bee Gees. Saturday Night Fever was filmed and is set during the late 1970's  when disco music was hitting the peak of mainstream popularity and bell bottoms were the height of fashion. Be aware, however,  this is not just a film about disco music and great group dance routines, it is a dark gritty coming of age drama that has the music and dancing as the escape from the pressures and problems of everyday life. The film centres on 19year old Tony Manero ( John Travolta ) living uncomfortably at home in Brooklyn with his large Italian-American family. He works weekdays in a dead end job and lives for the weekends when he can hang out with his like minded friends. Tony's escape comes in the form of a disco club called 2001 Odyssey where he is a well known figure and his dance moves elevate him to star like status. It is at the club he meets Stephanie who has plans to move to Manhattan away from the dull , working class Brooklyn to better her life. The film culminates in a  number of low points for Tony and a tragic event that forces him to decide wether or not to turn his back on his current way of life in search of something better. This film currently has three versions circulating on DVD and BLU RAY and depending on which you watch they will give the viewer a completely different experience. The most well known version is the high edited PG version. This is the version that is shown on terrestrial T.V. and was the second version to get a cinematic release due to the hype and mass popularity of the music and dance routines in the original R rated film. This version is quite disjointed and misses crucial points of the story solely concentrating more on the music and dance. The now more available to buy and rent version is the original cinematic release 18 or R rated version that is littered with sexual references , nudity , fighting, sex scenes and bad language . This is the gritty coming of age story that the music and dance although important is secondary and a great improvement on the PG version ,the main criticism is that some of the character development is a bit thin and we don't really get to know any other characters other than Tony and Stephanie. The final version is the directors cut , which has more character development and really centres on the deprivation and tough life in the Brooklyn suburbs compared to the dreams and aspirations that Stephanie wants to achieve across the bridge in Manhattan. Saturday night Fever is not a cheesy dance flick that the PG rating version had it become, it is a well told drama that  despite some 1970's  rather colourful language and uncomfortable actions still holds up really well today.

  • Mar 07, 2021

    Racist, sexist, misogynist, homophobic, apology for rape. There is no dance to save this dated film.

    Racist, sexist, misogynist, homophobic, apology for rape. There is no dance to save this dated film.

  • Mar 01, 2021

    The best segment is the intercourse between a man and a woman; rated R for language and sexuality/ nudity!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    The best segment is the intercourse between a man and a woman; rated R for language and sexuality/ nudity!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Dec 28, 2020

    Without it any doubt, it shall be named as a classic, the fantastic and maybe best of John Travolta performances steals the show with nice dances all the way.

    Without it any doubt, it shall be named as a classic, the fantastic and maybe best of John Travolta performances steals the show with nice dances all the way.